As of November 28, 2022

  • School TBD, Saint Petersburg, Russia, direct via TBD (Anna Kikina)
    • Wed 2022-11-30 14:25 UTC
  • School TBD, Kaliningrad, Russia, direct via TBD (Anna Kikina)
    • Wed 2022-11-30 16:00 UTC
  • School TBD, Vologda, Russia, direct via TBD (Anna Kikina)
    • Fri 2022-12-02 12:40 UTC
  • School TBD, Aznakayevo, Republic of Tatarstan, Russia, direct via TBD (Dimitri Petelin)
    • Sun 2022-12-04 11:20 UTC
  • British School in the Netherlands (Junior School Leidschenveen), The Hague, The Netherlands, direct via PE1RXJ (Josh Cassada KI5CRH)
    • Thu 2022-12-08 11:09:54 UTC 36 deg
  • Stella Maris College, Gzira, Malta, direct via 9H1MRL (Koichi Wakata KI5TMN)
    • Sat 2022-12-10 07:55:55 UTC 55 deg

ARISS News Release                                                             No. 22-63

ARISS Contact is Scheduled with Students at West Ferris Intermediate Secondary School, North Bay, Ontario, Canada

November 26, 2022—Amateur Radio on the International Space Station (ARISS) has received schedule confirmation for an ARISS radio contact between astronauts aboard the International Space Station (ISS) and students at the West Ferris Intermediate Secondary School located in ON, Canada.  ARISS conducts 60-80 of these special amateur radio contacts each year between students around the globe and crew members with ham radio licenses aboard the ISS.

West Ferris Intermediate Secondary School (with about 1100 students enrolled) is a grade 7 – 12 English public school located in North Bay, Ontario about 350 kilometers north of Toronto on the shores of Lake Nipissing. The school also serves several rural communities in the Nipissing District. Their curriculum offers innovative and diverse programming including French immersion, competitive athletic teams, and fine arts, and is the residence of the city’s STEAM program.  West Ferris students at the intermediate level are supported in a creative science program where problem solving and technological creativity is at the fore. 

Amateur Radio is an important component of the school’s Near Space Program in which students plan and execute stratospheric balloon launches under the guidance of an amateur radio operator/teacher. Students explore the theory and implementation of radio technology through the use of the Automatic Packet Reporting System (APRS) for payload tracking. Students learn the concepts of wave propagation, polarity, wavelength and frequency and the applications of these concepts. The School’s Near Space Program was started in 2018 with a stratospheric balloon launch in October, another on May 14, 2019, with plans to continue and expand the initiative in coming years. Members of the North Bay Amateur Radio Club (VE3NBC) provide technical support for the launches, an APRS gateway for tracking, and participate in the payload retrieval in chase cars.

This will be a telebridge Contact via Amateur Radio allowing students to ask their questions of Astronaut Koichi Wakata, amateur radio call sign KI5TMN. Local Covid-19 protocols are adhered to as applicable for each ARISS contact. The downlink frequency for this contact is 145.800 MHZ and may be heard by listeners that are within the ISS-footprint that also encompasses the telebridge station.

The ARISS amateur radio ground station (telebridge station) for this contact is in Aartselaar, Belgium. The amateur radio volunteer team at the ground station will use the callsign ON4ISS, to establish and maintain the ISS connection.

The ARISS radio contact is scheduled for November 28, 2022 at 10:58:45 am EST (ON, CANADA) (15:58:45 UTC, 9:58 am CST, 8:58 am MST, 7:58 am PST).
________________________
As time allows, students will ask these questions:

  1. Do you feel any changes when you return to Earth?
  2. What do you do during your free time?
  3. What is your favorite and least favorite food in space?
  4. How long did it take to get into space?
  5. Why did you decide to become an astronaut?
  6. What does your sleep schedule look like?
  7. How much food do you consume a day?
  8. How do you clean the station?
  9. Is it difficult to contact your family while there?
  10. When first entering space, do you feel any differences inside your body? For instance, your organs moving?
  11. What is the coolest thing you have seen while on station?
  12. Are space suits uncomfortable?
  13. How long have you been an astronaut?
  14. How do you keep your bones from getting weaker in space and how do you restrengthen them after returning?
  15. Once in space, how long do you have to be there for?
  16. Has there been anything that you weren’t prepared for that you thought you were?
  17. How do you deal with an illness in space and have no medication to help the person who is ill?
    ___________________

ARISS News Release                                                             No. 22-62

ARISS Contact is Scheduled with Students at Escola Naval (Brazil Navy Academy), Island of Villegagnon, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil

November 25, 2022—Amateur Radio on the International Space Station (ARISS) has received schedule confirmation for an ARISS radio contact between astronauts aboard the International Space Station (ISS) and students at the Brazil Navy Academy located in Rio de Janeiro.  ARISS conducts 60-80 of these special amateur radio contacts each year between students around the globe and crew members with ham radio licenses aboard the ISS.

Founded in 1792, The Brazil Navy Academy is a higher education military academy which trains officers for the Brazilian Navy. Through a five-year program, the school’s main objective is to graduate marines, logistics and fleet officers for Brazil’s naval service. Training also has included instruction on their training ship “Brasil” during a world-wide tour.

This will be a direct contact via Amateur Radio allowing students to ask their questions of Astronaut Josh Cassada, amateur radio call sign KI5CRH. Local Covid-19 protocols are adhered to as applicable for each ARISS contact. The downlink frequency for this contact is 145.800 MHZ and may be heard by listeners that are within the ISS-footprint that also encompasses the relay ground station.

The amateur radio ground station for this contact is on the Island of Villegagnon in the city of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. Amateur radio operators using call sign PY1AX, will operate the ground station to establish and maintain the ISS connection.

The ARISS radio contact is scheduled for November 28, 2022 at 9:23:41am BRT (Brazil) (12:23:41UTC, 7:23 am EST, 6:23 am CST, 5:23 am MST, 4:23 am PST).
_______________________
As time allows, students will ask these questions:

  1. What are the projections for life on the Moon? Is it going to happen in the near future or is it something far from happening?
  2. If there are any, what are the effects of the Theory of Relativity on you on the space station?
  3. Have you ever felt the “overview effect”? How does it feel to see everything you know in front of your eyes, without borders, without wars, without religions, just a celestial sphere in the middle of the darkness and emptiness?
  4. How do space agencies deal with health complications that might arise when an astronaut returns to Earth after a long period in orbit?
  5. What is the most difficult challenge you have encountered in space?
  6. What are the short-term and long-term objectives of the station?
  7. How do you counteract the side effects of staying in a microgravity environment for a considerable amount of time?
  8. The importance of the International Space Station is immeasurable. How do you see it shutting down? And what are the consequences?
  9. What is the preparation to work for a long time and to survive in the station?
  10. How can the ISS work to reduce the trash left in space?
  11. How is Artificial Intelligence (AI) used on the International Space Station and for which purpose?
  12. What are the benefits of the ISS for humanity?
  13. What experiments are you doing at the moment?
  14. What is the procedure if someone has a serious health problem?
  15. Have you ever had any contact with the amateur radio community before boarding the ISS?
  16. What is the most important thing when you are getting ready for a mission?
  17. How does the application process for the space station work and who selects the crew?
    ____________________________

ARISS News Release                                                            No. 22-61

ARISS Contact is Scheduled with Students at Five Bridges Junior High School, Stillwater Lake, Nova Scotia, Canada

November 20, 2022—Amateur Radio on the International Space Station (ARISS) has received schedule confirmation for an ARISS radio contact between an astronaut aboard the International Space Station (ISS) and students at the Five Bridges Junior High School located in Stillwater Lake, NS, CAN.  ARISS conducts 60-80 of these special amateur radio contacts each year between students around the globe and crew members with ham radio licenses aboard the ISS.

Five Bridge Junior High School is a rural school located in the community of Hubley, just outside Halifax, the Provincial Capital city of Nova Scotia, Canada. Leading up to this ARISS contact, students are learning about space exploration through activities that includes constructing models of planets within our solar system, attending presentations from the Royal Astronomical Society of Canada, testing and growing of tomato seeds that have previously flown on the ISS, and examining black holes and the origins of the universe. Students are also learning about past lunar landings, the future Artemis program as well as the Gateway program. Local amateur radio operators have also provided students with a series of presentations about amateur radio.

This will be a telebridge Contact via Amateur Radio allowing students to ask their questions of Astronaut Josh Cassada, amateur radio call sign KI5CRH. Local Covid-19 protocols are adhered to as applicable for each ARISS contact. The downlink frequency for this contact is 145.800 MHZ and may be heard by listeners that are within the ISS-footprint that also encompasses the telebridge station.

The ARISS amateur radio ground station (telebridge station) for this contact is in Casale Monferrato,  Italy. The amateur radio volunteer team at the ground station will use the callsign IK1SLD, to establish and maintain the ISS connection.

The ARISS radio contact is scheduled for November 23, 2022 at 12:52 pm AST (Nova Scotia) (16:52:06 UTC, 11:52 am EST, 10:52 am CST, 9:52 am MST, 8:52 am PST).

The public is invited to watch the live stream at: https://www.ariotti.com/
_______________________
As time allows, students will ask these questions:

  1. Why did you choose to be an astronaut?
  2. What was the best or most interesting part of your training to become an astronaut?
  3. What is it like to go through the atmosphere and into space at high speeds for extended periods of time?
  4. Does everyone rest at the same time or do you work in shifts?
  5. What is a day like for you on the ISS?
  6. What do you hope to achieve with your experiments during your mission?
  7. How will the use of robotics help Astronauts in the future?
  8. What are your hobbies and how do you pursue them on the ISS?
  9. What are problems that you have to anticipate/prepare for in space that you would not have to on Earth?
  10. What are some common misconceptions about astronauts?
  11. How do you celebrate all the diverse nationalities, beliefs and religions while on board the ISS?
  12. When the ISS is retired from service in 2030 what will replace it in low earth orbit?
  13. What kinds of equipment and materials had to come along for your specific mission?
  14. If you weren’t an astronaut what job would you have pursued and why?
  15. If there was one thing you wanted young people to know about Space and/or Aerospace Programs, what would it be?
  16. How will the effects of increasing radiation from the sun affect life on the ISS?
  17. For students who are interested in Aerospace, what fields of science or skills do you recommend they explore?
  18. How noisy is it in the ISS?
    ________________________

ARISS News Release                                                            No. 22-60

ARISS Contact is Scheduled with Students in Nine Countries in the Caribbean and Central America and Hosted by St. Joseph´s Convent Secondary School, Castries, Saint Lucia

November 19, 2022—Amateur Radio on the International Space Station (ARISS) has received schedule confirmation for an ARISS radio contact between an astronaut aboard the International Space Station (ISS) and students in nine different countries in the Caribbean and Central America.  ARISS conducts 60-80 of these special amateur radio contacts each year between students around the globe and crew members with ham radio licenses aboard the ISS.

St. Joseph´s Convent Secondary School, in Castries, Saint Lucia is hosting this ARISS contact allowing students at 12 schools to contact the ISS. The students have been studying and monitoring natural hazards as viewed from space. The schools involved in this contact are: Colegio Agustiniano Nuestra Señora del Buen Consejo in Panama, Escuela La Pradera and Escuela Francisco Gamboa Mora in Costa Rica, St. Nicholas Primary School in Antigua and Barbuda, New Horizons School in the Dominican Republic, John Cumber School and John Gray High School in the Cayman Islands, St. Joseph’s Convent Castries and St. Mary’s College in St Lucia, St. Nicholas Primary School in Antigua and Barbuda, Joshua Obadiah Williams Primary School in St. Kitts and Nevis, and, Grande Riviere Anglican Primary School in Trinidad and Tobago.

This will be a Multipoint Telebridge Contact via Amateur Radio and students will take turns asking their questions of Astronaut Josh Cassada, amateur radio call sign KI5CRH. Local Covid-19 protocols are adhered to as applicable for each ARISS contact. The downlink frequency for this contact is 145.800 MHZ and may be heard by listeners that are within the ISS-footprint that also encompasses the telebridge station.

The ARISS amateur radio ground station (telebridge station) for this contact is in Casale Monferrato, Italy. The amateur radio volunteer team at the station will use the callsign IK1SLD, to establish and maintain the ISS connection.

The ARISS radio contact is scheduled for November 22, 2022 at 1:40:36 pm AST (Saint Lucia)(17:40:36 UTC, 12:40 pm EST, 11:40 am CST, 10:40 am MST, 9:40 am PST).

The public is invited to watch the live stream at: https://www.ariotti.com
___________________
As time allows, students will ask these questions:

  1. What is the international space station?
  2. How do you see meteorological events from space and what is it like to be there?
  3. If a hurricane is happening can you see it in space?
  4. How long did you study to become an astronaut?
  5. What do you do in space?
  6. Do you study and measure climate change from space?
  7. When a volcanic eruption happens, can you see the effects from space?
  8. What are the impacts of space hurricanes and does it affect us here on earth?
  9. How close does a meteorite have to pass to affect the Earth?
  10. Do other planets have volcanoes?
  11. What can I do to make sea levels stop rising?
  12. What does the moon look like up close?
  13. When does the Sahara sand cross the Atlantic Ocean?
  14. Can you see rainbows in space?
    __________________

ARISS News Release                                                              No. 22-59

ARISS Contact is Scheduled with Students at Harel Educational Campus, Holon, Israel

November 2, 2022—Amateur Radio on the International Space Station (ARISS) has received schedule confirmation for an ARISS radio contact between an astronaut aboard the International Space Station (ISS) and students at the Harel Educational Campus located in Holon, Israel.  ARISS conducts 60-80 of these special amateur radio contacts each year between students around the globe and crew members with ham radio licenses aboard the ISS.

Harel Educational Campus (Harel) is a six-year boy’s school, comprising intermediate through high school levels (class 7 to class 12) and is located in Holon, a suburb of Tel-Aviv. Harel incorporates high spiritual, religious education with studies that include; communication, graphic design, robotics, cinema, computers and literature. The school is sponsoring this ARISS contact in order to inspire their students and boost their curiosity in science.

This will be a telebridge Contact via Amateur Radio allowing students to ask their questions of Astronaut Josh Cassada, amateur radio call sign KI5CRH. Local Covid-19 protocols are adhered to as applicable for each ARISS contact. The downlink frequency for this contact is 145.800 MHZ and may be heard by listeners that are within the ISS-footprint that also encompasses the telebridge station.

The ARISS amateur radio ground station (telebridge station) for this contact is in Andergrove, Mackay, Queensland, Australia. The amateur radio volunteer team at the ground station will use the callsign VK4ISS, to establish and maintain the ISS connection.

The ARISS radio contact is scheduled for November 4, 2022 at 11:43:51 am IST (Holon, Israel) (9:43:51 UTC, 5:43 am EDT, 4:43 am CDT, 3:43 am MDT, 2:43 am PDT).
__________________________
As time allows, students will ask these questions:

  1. I know you use animals in research. How many animals do you have in space with you right now and how do you take care of them?
  2. Do you practice emergency drills? Can you describe some of the critical incidents that you need to prepare for?
  3. What has been your greatest challenge so far and how did you respond to it?
  4. What are the major research projects you are focusing on and what discoveries have you made?
  5. What do you think the biggest advances will be in the space program over the next ten years?
  6. Have any of the experiments failed or given you totally different results than you expected?
  7. Please describe your years of education and training that led to your assignment on the space station.
  8. What has been the most exciting part of your mission so far?
  9. Can you describe what zero gravity feels like?
  10. Have you done a spacewalk and how does it feel?
  11. Why should we continue to fund expensive space missions when we have more pressing problems on Earth?
  12. How are your experiments helping to save our Earth?
  13. Being in a microgravity environment causes a decrease in muscle mass and bone density. Other than exercise, what measures are you taking to protect your health?
  14. How many days supplies do you have on board should a resupply mission not come on time?
  15. Can you describe the automatic systems on board the ISS to keep you in your current orbit?
  16. Do you ever feel sudden vertigo or claustrophobia whilst you are up in space?
  17. Can you describe how you get into and leave the ISS without losing any air?
  18. How long does it take to prepare for a spacewalk?
  19. Does gravity affect time and ageing?
  20. What is the most amazing thing you have seen in space?
  21. Is the sun more powerful in space?
    ________

ARISS News Release                                                               No. 22-58

ARISS Contact is Scheduled with Students at Five Bridges Junior High School, Stillwater Lake, Nova Scotia, Canada

Five Bridges Junior High School, Stillwater Lake, NS, Canada, telebridge via VK4KHZ has been postponed to the week of Nov 14 due to crew timeline changes.

October 24, 2022—Amateur Radio on the International Space Station (ARISS) has received schedule confirmation for an ARISS radio contact between an astronaut aboard the International Space Station (ISS) and students at the Five Bridges Junior High School located in Stillwater Lake, NS, CAN.  ARISS conducts 60-80 of these special amateur radio contacts each year between students around the globe and crew members with ham radio licenses aboard the ISS.

Five Bridge Junior High School is a rural school located in the community of Hubley, just outside Halifax, the Provincial Capital city of Nova Scotia, Canada. Leading up to this ARISS contact, students are learning about space exploration through activities that includes constructing models of planets within our solar system, attending presentations from the Royal Astronomical Society of Canada, testing and growing of tomato seeds that have previously flown on the ISS, and examining black holes and the origins of the universe. Students are also learning about past lunar landings, the future Artemis program as well as the Gateway program. Local amateur radio operators have also provided students with a series of presentations about amateur radio.

This will be a telebridge Contact via Amateur Radio allowing students to ask their questions of Astronaut Josh Cassada, amateur radio call sign KI5CRH. Local Covid-19 protocols are adhered to as applicable for each ARISS contact. The downlink frequency for this contact is 145.800 MHZ and may be heard by listeners that are within the ISS-footprint that also encompasses the telebridge station.

The ARISS amateur radio ground station (telebridge station) for this contact is in Glenden, Queensland, Australia. The amateur radio volunteer team at the ground station will use the callsign VK4KHZ, to establish and maintain the ISS connection.

The ARISS radio contact is scheduled for October 26, 2022 at 10:44 am ADT (Nova Scotia) (13:44:18UTC, 9:44 am EDT, 8:44 am CDT, 7:44 am MDT, 6:44 am PDT).

The public is invited to watch the live stream at: https://www.youtube.com/c/ARISSlive and https://nslive.tv/five-bridges-ariss
_______________________
As time allows, students will ask these questions:

  1. Why did you choose to be an astronaut?
  2. What was the best or most interesting part of your training to become an astronaut?
  3. What is it like to go through the atmosphere and into space at high speeds for extended periods of time?
  4. Does everyone rest at the same time or do you work in shifts?
  5. What is a day like for you on the ISS?
  6. What do you hope to achieve with your experiments during your mission?
  7. How will the use of robotics help Astronauts in the future?
  8. What are your hobbies and how do you pursue them on the ISS?
  9. What are problems that you have to anticipate/prepare for in space that you would not have to on Earth?
  10. What are some common misconceptions about astronauts?
  11. How do you celebrate all the diverse nationalities, beliefs and religions while on board the ISS?
  12. When the ISS is retired from service in 2030 what will replace it in low earth orbit?
  13. What kinds of equipment and materials had to come along for your specific mission?
  14. If you weren’t an astronaut what job would you have pursued and why?
  15. If there was one thing you wanted young people to know about Space and/or Aerospace Programs, what would it be?
  16. How will the effects of increasing radiation from the sun affect life on the ISS?
  17. For students who are interested in Aerospace, what fields of science or skills do you recommend they explore?
  18. How noisy is it in the ISS?
    __________________________

ARISS News Release                                                                No. 22-57

ARISS Contact is Scheduled with Students at Canterbury School of Fort Myers, Fort Myers, Florida, USA

October 23, 2022—Amateur Radio on the International Space Station (ARISS) has received schedule confirmation for an ARISS radio contact between an astronaut aboard the International Space Station (ISS) and students at the Canterbury School of Fort Myers located in Fort Myers, FL.  ARISS conducts 60-80 of these special amateur radio contacts each year between students around the globe and crew members with ham radio licenses aboard the ISS.

Canterbury School is a private, pre-K3 through 12, college preparatory school (about 700 students, ages 3-19 years) in Fort Myers, Florida. Beginning in the fall of the 2021-2022 school year, students in every class, club, and activity have been studying topics of space, rockets, radios, and the ISS. Students in Upper School astronomy, engineering, and robotics have built a satellite tracking antenna that will be used during this contact. And members of Fort Myers Amateur Radio Club (W4LX) are supporting the school by providing students with technical instruction, radio equipment setup and radio operation during the ARISS contact. Then, during the summer of 2022, as students were in the midst of designing and building rover models for Mars and the Moon, they saw the first pictures of Hurricane Ian, as seen from the ISS, bearing down on the coast of Florida. Evacuations were ordered in advance of the catastrophic winds and storm surges, which eventually affected many of the homes of students, faculty, and staff. In the wake of this destruction, it was uncertain whether this ARISS contact could occur. However, if only for a moment of reprieve from their loss and destruction, the entire Canterbury school community, including the school’s staff/faculty, amateur radio operators, students and students’ families, decided to pull together to support this ARISS contact and thereby renew their sense of hope and inspiration in human space exploration.

This will be a direct contact via Amateur Radio allowing students to ask their questions of Astronaut Josh Cassada, amateur radio call sign KI5CRH. Local Covid-19 protocols are adhered to as applicable for each ARISS contact. The downlink frequency for this contact is 145.800 MHZ and may be heard by listeners that are within the ISS-footprint that also encompasses the relay ground station.

The amateur radio ground station for this contact is in Fort Myers, FL, USA. Amateur radio operators using call sign W4LX, will operate the ground station to establish and maintain the ISS connection.

The ARISS radio contact is scheduled for October 24, 2022 at 1:36 pm EDT (Fort Myers, FL) (17:36UTC, 12:36 pm CDT, 11:36 am MDT, 10:36 am PDT).

The public is invited to watch the live stream at: https://vimeo.com/762320321
_____________________
As time allows, students will ask these questions:

  1. Can you make cupcakes in space?
  2. How do you not get lost in space?
  3. Does the sun look different from the ISS compared to Earth?
  4. If you could travel to any planet, which one would you go to?
  5. What is your favorite meal in space?
  6. Are more women astronauts training to go to the moon?
  7. What is the most extraordinary thing you have seen in space?
  8. How does space debris affect satellites and the ISS?
  9. How old were you when you decided that you wanted to go on the International Space Station?
  10. Is it hard to get used to Earth’s gravity after spending so much time on the ISS?
  11. What would you say or show to people who are convinced that space and the ISS is a hoax? 
  12. What kind of research are you currently working on?
  13. Would you be willing to live on the new moon base once it is built?
  14. What does it feel like to experience that many g’s of acceleration when taking off from Earth?
  15. What do you enjoy doing during your free time on the ISS?
  16. What went through your head while blasting off from Earth?
    ___________

ARISS News Release                                                                 No. 22-56

ARISS Contact is Scheduled with Students at Chief Whitecap Elementary School, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada

October 17, 2022—Amateur Radio on the International Space Station (ARISS) has received schedule confirmation for an ARISS radio contact between an astronaut aboard the International Space Station (ISS) and students at the Chief Whitecap Elementary School located in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan.  ARISS conducts 60-80 of these special amateur radio contacts each year between students around the globe and crew members with ham radio licenses aboard the ISS.

Chief Whitecap School is a kindergarten to grade 8 school with about 1,030 students. The school operates as a partnership between Whitecap Dakota First Nation and Saskatoon Public Schools, and embodies the vision of provincially mandated curriculum in alignment with Dakota First Nations culture, language, and traditions. To enhance the student’s experience during the ARISS contact, Chief Whitecap School integrated the topic of space through all the core subjects for all grades. Their goal is to raise the student’s appreciation and interest in the science and technology of space exploration as well as give the students an exciting and relevant learning opportunity that will form a life-time memory – talking with an astronaut aboard the ISS.

This will be a telebridge Contact via Amateur Radio allowing students to ask their questions of Astronaut Josh Cassada, amateur radio call sign KI5CRH. Local Covid-19 protocols are adhered to as applicable for each ARISS contact. The downlink frequency for this contact is 145.800 MHZ and may be heard by listeners that are within the ISS-footprint that also encompasses the telebridge station.

The ARISS amateur radio ground station (telebridge station) for this contact is in Meadow Spring, Australia. The amateur radio volunteer team at the ground station will use the callsign VK6MJ, to establish and maintain the ISS connection.

The ARISS radio contact is scheduled for October 19, 2022 at 11:35 am CST (Saskatoon) (17:35 UTC, 1:35 pm EDT, 12:35 pm CDT, 11:35 am MDT, 10:35 am PDT).
______________________________
As time allows, students will ask these questions:

  1. Who or what was your inspiration to be an astronaut?
  2. What subjects do I need to focus on in school if I want to be an astronaut?
  3. How long did you train to become an astronaut?
  4. What advice would you give to aspiring astronauts?
  5. What has been your favorite part of the ISS mission so far?
  6. How do you stay connected to your family while you are on the ISS?
  7. What is your most favorite meal in space?
  8. How do you handle an astronaut getting sick or hurt on the ISS?
  9. Besides your family, what do you miss most about being on Earth?
  10. How do stars look in space?
  11. Have you ever seen any alien lifeform?
  12. How much free time do you get while on the ISS?
  13. How does the space toilet work?
  14. What does microgravity feel like?
  15. How would you deal with something happening to the ISS structure?
  16. What do you not like about being on the ISS?
  17. What has been your scariest moment in space?
  18. What is your role on the ISS?
  19. How do you sleep in space?
  20. What words would you use to describe leaving the earth’s atmosphere?
    ____________________

ARISS News Release                                                                 No. 22-55

ARISS Contact is Scheduled with Students at Davis Aerospace Technical High School, Detroit, Michigan, USA

October 16, 2022—Amateur Radio on the International Space Station (ARISS) has received schedule confirmation for an ARISS radio contact between an astronaut aboard the International Space Station (ISS) and students at the Davis Aerospace Technical High School located in Detroit, MI. ARISS conducts 60-80 of these special amateur radio contacts each year between students around the globe and crew members with ham radio licenses aboard the ISS.

Detroit Public Schools Community District’s Davis Aerospace Technical High School (Davis HS), founded in 1943, is named in honor of Benjamin O. Davis Jr., the first African American General in the United States Air Force. All Davis HS students in grades 9th through 12th are enrolled in the school’s aviation/aerospace classes, which are designed to prepare them to enter the fields of both aviation and aerospace. The school’s curriculum includes a flight training program allowing students to learn a variety of concepts and regulations related to unmanned and manned flight. Students also can take preparation classes for remote pilot’s certificate and train on state-of-the-art flight simulators, and can participate in a newly re-established Aircraft Maintenance CTE program where they work on aircraft at Colman A. Young City Airport. Located within the Golightly Career and Technical Center, Davis HS’s alumni includes pilots, drone operators, aircraft mechanics, engineers, and others in various high-tech professions. Members of the Hazel Park Amateur Radio Club (W8HP) are supporting the school for this ARISS contact by providing equipment setup assistance and ham radio instruction to students in the school’s newly formed (2021) amateur radio club. Students active in the school’s ham club will be working on their amateur radio FCC license using text books provided by ARRL Great Lakes Division member Dale Williams, WA8EFK. 

This will be a direct contact via Amateur Radio allowing students to ask their questions of Astronaut Koichi Wakata, amateur radio call sign KI5TMN. Local Covid-19 protocols are adhered to as applicable for each ARISS contact. The downlink frequency for this contact is 145.800 MHZ and may be heard by listeners that are within the ISS-footprint that also encompasses the relay ground station.

The amateur radio ground station for this contact is in Detroit, MI. Amateur radio operators using call sign W8HP, will operate the ground station to establish and maintain the ISS connection.

The ARISS radio contact is scheduled for October 18, 2022 at 1:30 pm EDT (Detroit) (17:30 UTC,    12:30 pm CDT, 11:30 am MDT, 10:30 am PDT).

The public is invited to watch the live stream at: https://youtu.be/Vk_FxTmIek8
_____________________
As time allows, students will ask these questions:

  1. How much does the ISS orbit decay over time before a correction is required?
  2. What are you learning about lightning as a result of the experiments aboard the ISS?
  3. How do you scrub the air of ISS of toxins, odors, germs and other contaminates?
  4. What does it feel like when you take off in the Rocket?
  5. How long will the ISS batteries last without a charge?
  6. How much does a space station weigh (on earth) and how large is the space station?
  7. Does the ISS use the sun’s radiation for temperature control?
  8. How much weight can the space station hold and how long can you stay in space until the oxygen runs out, or do you make your own oxygen?
  9. If the batteries are part of the primary power source what is the emergency back-up power supply? How are they powered?
  10. Do the solar cells track the sun or does the ISS track the sun to ensure maximum solar cell efficiency?
  11. If there is an unexpected decompression of the ISS how do you repair and pressurize the ISS?
  12. Are your transmitting antennas stabilized in order to maintain the best quality contact?
  13. The Solar Cells produce DC Power. What type of power does the equipment on the ISS operate on?
  14. How do you protect equipment and Astronauts from radiation?
  15. How do you like the new Radio compared to the old radio?
    _____________________

ARISS News Release                                                              No. 22-54

ARISS Contact is Scheduled with Students at Harris Middle School, Spruce Pine, North Carolina, USA

October 8, 2022—Amateur Radio on the International Space Station (ARISS) has received schedule confirmation for an ARISS radio contact between astronauts aboard the International Space Station (ISS) and students at Harris Middle School located in Spruce Pine, NC, USA.  ARISS conducts 60-80 of these special amateur radio contacts each year between students around the globe and crew members with ham radio licenses aboard the ISS.

Harris Middle School, a rural public school in Spruce Pine, NC, was founded in 1916 and is one of only two middle schools in Mitchell County serving, 237 students in grades six, seven, and eight. The school incorporated amateur radio related studies and activities into their existing STEM curriculum prior to this ARISS contact. This included satellite communications (frequency Doppler affects), building UHF/VHF yagi antennas, and building an amateur satellite communication station. Students studied mathematical relationships of radio wave properties, and gravity of orbiting bodies. Courses incorporated topics that included space exploration, the solar system, and Earth’s weather system. Students also learned more about the history of the ISS, and the affects of living in space. For this ARISS contact, the school partnered with the College Foundation of Western North Carolina for the establishment of the school’s amateur radio satellite station.

This will be a direct contact via Amateur Radio allowing students to ask their questions of Astronaut Bob Hines, amateur radio call sign KI5RQT. Local Covid-19 protocols are adhered to as applicable for each ARISS contact. The downlink frequency for this contact is 145.800 MHZ and may be heard by listeners that are within the ISS-footprint that also encompasses the relay ground station.

The amateur radio ground station for this contact is in Spruce Pine, NC. Amateur radio operators using call sign K4CF, will operate the ground station to establish and maintain the ISS connection.

The ARISS radio contact is scheduled for October 11, 2022 at 11:00:45 am EDT (Spruce Pine, NC) (15:00:45UTC, 10:00 am CDT, 9:00 am MDT, 8:00 am PDT).

The public is invited to watch the live stream at: https://www.facebook.com/mitchellcountyschools
________________________
As time allows, students will ask these questions:

1) What inspired you to become an astronaut and what has been your most challenging part of your journey?
2) If an astronaut is sick or injured, how are they treated? How would he or she get back to Earth in an emergency?
3) Are all the astronauts on the ISS on the same sleep and work schedule or are there different shifts?
4) How many crew members do you have on board?
5) When you finish your mission on the ISS, would you like to be a part of the Artemis program or even go to Mars?
6) Does the ISS have an escape vehicle and have you ever had to use it?
7) If you had to give advice to a future astronaut about something they should know that training did not prepare them for, what would you tell them?
8) What is your educational background or field of study?
9) How do you maintain adequate nutrition and fitness while being on board the ISS?
10) What will you miss the most while being in Space? What food item not available on the ISS will you miss the most?
11) How do you celebrate birthdays and holidays on the ISS?
12) How do you stay in touch with your family?
13) How do the astronauts wash their hair without getting water everywhere?
14) Are you or anyone else up there doing research on any diseases that affect humans? Are you aware of any research in space that has helped to understand, treat, or cure a disease?
15) What is your favorite space-themed movie?
16) How long have you been involved in the space program and how long have you been on the ISS?
17) How long have you been a ham and what do you enjoy about it?
________________________

ARISS News Release                                                                  No. 22-53

ARISS Contact is Scheduled with Students at Escuela #38 Raul Alfonsin, Esperanza Base, Argentina
 Argentine Research Station in Hope Bay, Trinity Peninsula, Antarctica

October 5, 2022—Amateur Radio on the International Space Station (ARISS) has received schedule confirmation for an ARISS radio contact between astronauts on-board the International Space Station (ISS) and students at the School #38 Raul Alfonsin, located on Esperanza Base, Argentina.  ARISS conducts 60-80 of these special amateur radio contacts each year between students around the globe and crew members with ham radio licenses on-board the ISS.

School #38 Raul Alfonsin was established in 1978 when the first families of the base personnel began to arrive at Base Esperanza, and the mothers of the students served as teachers. In 1997 the school became part of the Ministry of Education of the Province of Tierra del Fuego, Antarctica and the South Atlantic Islands. The Esperanza base is located at Punta Foca in Esperanza Bay on the Trinidad peninsula, about 1,100 kilometers from Ushuaia and about 3,200 from Buenos Aires. The school serves 16 students (school year 2022) with ages ranging from 3 to 21 years.

This will be a telebridge Contact via Amateur Radio and students will take turns asking their questions of Astronaut Kjell Lindgren, amateur radio call sign KO5MOS. Local Covid-19 protocols are adhered to as applicable for each ARISS contact. The downlink frequency for this contact is 145.800 MHZ and may be heard by listeners that are within the ISS-footprint that also encompasses the telebridge station.

The ARISS amateur radio ground station (telebridge station) for this contact is in Aartselaar, Belgium. The amateur radio volunteer team at the ground station will use the callsign ON4ISS, to establish and maintain the ISS connection.

The ARISS radio contact is scheduled for October 7, 2022 at 12:14 pm ART (Esperanza Base)   (15:14:18 UTC, 11:14 am EDT, 10:14 am CDT, 9:14 am MDT, 8:14 am PDT).
________________________
As time allows, students will ask these questions:

  1. What does the Earth like from the space?
  2. Do you remember your first day in space? Can you describe your emotions to us?
  3. How do you go to the bathroom in the space? How does the space toilet work?
  4. What are the most important activities of the day, or a working day?
  5. What do you do in your free time?
  6. How are the daily tasks divided with the rest of the crew?
  7. What do you usually have for lunch? What do you usually eat?
  8. In our Base in Antarctic, we call the power generation plant “the heart of the base”. What would you call the heart of the space station?
  9. When are you coming back to the earth? How are you coming back?
  10. What was the root cause of your decision to be an Astronaut?
  11. Which message would you give to the people who dream to be an Astronaut?
  12. What are the strangest things that have happened to you during your mission in Space?
  13. What happens if someone gets seriously ill, how do you send him back?
  14. An Icebreaker ship brought us here, how did you get to the International Station?
  15. Have you even been to the Antarctic continent? Would you like to visit us, sometime?
    ________________________

ARISS News Release                                                                  No. 22-51

ARISS Contact is Scheduled with Students at St. Stephen’s Episcopal School Houston, Houston, Texas USA

September 30, 2022—Amateur Radio on the International Space Station (ARISS) has received schedule confirmation for an ARISS radio contact between astronauts aboard the International Space Station (ISS) and students at St. Stephen’s Episcopal School located in Houston, TX.  ARISS conducts 60-80 of these special amateur radio contacts each year between students around the globe and crew members with ham radio licenses aboard the ISS.

St. Stephen’s Episcopal School in Houston is an urban, private school and home of the da Vinci Lab for Creative Arts and Sciences (da Vinci Lab) that provides a STEAM learning program. The da Vinci Lab serves 75 students from ages 6 through 14 who are involved daily with core STEM lessons that also include topics on electronics and radio concepts. The students get to build circuits learning the difference between series and parallel circuits and the foundations for Ohm’s law.  Course topics and activities also include the history of Morse Code (playing Battleship using only Morse Code signals), Slow Scan Television (sending messages with walkie talkies) and radio wave properties (demonstrated during their annual Fox Hunt event). Students are already avid ISS trackers, and travel to local parks or other vantage points to view the ISS as it passes over Houston. In the weeks leading up to the ARISS contact students were involved in more specific lessons, some of these included exploring (virtually) inside the ISS, living on the ISS, NASA’s Mars rover landing, tracking CubeSats, building yagi antennas, and working the ISS APRS digipeater. Members of the local amateur radio club (Brazos Valley Amateur Radio Club) are supporting the school during this contact.

This will be a direct contact via Amateur Radio allowing students to ask their questions of Astronaut Bob Hines, amateur radio call sign KI5RQT. Local Covid-19 protocols are adhered to as applicable for each ARISS contact. The downlink frequency for this contact is 145.800 MHZ and may be heard by listeners that are within the ISS-footprint that also encompasses the relay ground station.

The amateur radio ground station for this contact is in Houston, TX, USA. Amateur radio operators using call sign KG5QNO, will operate the ground station to establish and maintain the ISS connection.

The ARISS radio contact is scheduled for October 3, 2022 at 1:09:27 pm CDT (Houston, TX)   (18:09:27 UTC, 2:09 pm EDT, 12:09 pm MDT, 11:09 am PDT).
_______________________________________________
As time allows, students will ask these questions:

  1. How do we go to space?
  2. How do you drive a rocket?
  3. What was your motivation to get to the ISS?
  4. How do you feel when you come back to Earth?
  5. Do you lose track of which way is up?
  6. How do you maintain the water supply on ISS?
  7. How do plants grow in space?
  8. Can you eat Ramen in space?
  9. Do your ears hurt when you fly to Earth?
  10. Do you ever get tired?
  11. Is your wifi the fastest because you are in a satellite?
  12. Is the station cold?
  13. Have you ever been in a crisis in the ISS?
  14. How did you and your family prepare for your trip to space?
  15. Does it feel cool doing a backflip in space?
  16. Have you encountered a micrometeorite?
  17. Are there germs in space?
  18. Do you play any games?
  19. What happens if someone dies in the space ship?
  20. Do you ever get lonely
    _________________________

ARISS News Release                                                                  No. 22-50

ARISS Contact is Scheduled with Students from New England Sci-Tech Featured at the BIG E in W. Springfield, Massachusetts, USA

September 23, 2022—Amateur Radio on the International Space Station (ARISS) has received schedule confirmation for an ARISS radio contact between an astronaut aboard the International Space Station (ISS) and students from New England Sci-Tech located in Natick, MA.  ARISS conducts 60-80 of these special amateur radio contacts each year between students around the globe and crew members with ham radio licenses aboard the ISS. The BIG E (“New England’s Great State Fair”) is hosting this ARISS contact during the annual state fair event, to be held in their large performance arena with seating for over 5,000 people.

New England Sci-Tech is a non-profit STEM and education center and makerspace dedicated to project-based, hands-on learning for youth and families across the New England community.  The institution provides STEM education for youth through adult ages, both in-person and remote learning. The science-technology facility has a fully equipped ham radio lab, space science lab, maker space with a battling bots arena, 2D/3D design lab, woodworking shop, and a 5-meter- sized planetarium. Located on one of the highest hills in Natick, Massachusetts, the facility is ideally suited for amateur radio as well as astronomy. With a solar telescope and several large night scopes the school offers free public observing sessions to watch the sun, stars, moon, planets, and overhead passes of satellites and the International Space Station. To support this ARISS contact, New England Sci-Tech staff developed a 12-month program that provided students hands-on experience in model rocketry, astronomy, electronics, coding, mathematics, and, of course, amateur radio.  Guidance on amateur radio-related activities and course curriculum has been provided by Fred Kemmerer (AB1OC) (ARRL New England Division Director and ARISS Mentor),  long-time instructor on amateur radio and satellite communications topics. Hands on instruction has been provided by members of the Sci-Tech Amateur Radio Society (STARS) (W1STR).

This will be a telebridge Contact via Amateur Radio allowing students to ask their questions of Astronaut Bob Hines, amateur radio call sign KI5RQT. Local Covid-19 protocols are adhered to as applicable for each ARISS contact. The downlink frequency for this contact is 145.800 MHZ and may be heard by listeners that are within the ISS-footprint that also encompasses the telebridge station.

The ARISS amateur radio ground station (telebridge station) for this contact is in Aartselaar, Belgium. The amateur radio volunteer team at the ground station will use the callsign ON4ISS, to establish and maintain the ISS connection.

The ARISS radio contact is scheduled for September 27, 2022 at 2:30 pm EDT (West Springfield, MA) (18:30:39 UTC, 1:30 pm CDT, 12:30 pm MDT, 11:30 am PDT). Special programming prior to initiating the radio contact will begin at 1:20 pm EDT. 

The public is invited to watch the live stream at: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hdxnD8uF8t0
___________________________

As time allows, students will ask these questions:

  1. Have you used any AI Robots to help you on the space station?
  2. How would you feel, if we find signs of life on another planet?
  3. What happens if an astronaut gets sick in space?
  4. How do all the modules from different countries interconnect without causing software or hardware incompatibilities?
  5. What exercise method do you find most useful to ward off muscle atrophy?
  6. Have you experienced light flashes or Astronaut’s Eye?
  7. It is my absolute dream to be sitting in the same position you are. If you could give me just one piece of advice what would it be?
  8. Have you ever been on the ISS when it was impacted by an object in space such as a micrometeorite?
  9. Do you ever feel pain because of the way microgravity affects your muscles?
  10. Did you find the astronaut training program was mentally or physically strenuous or stressful?
  11. How does seeing the earth from a different perspective change the way you think about life?
  12. What advice would you give to children who wish to someday become an astronaut?
  13. If extravehicular activity didn’t require so much preparation beforehand, would you do it more often?
  14. What was the most amazing thing you saw your first time in space?
  15. Have you used amateur radio on the ISS besides making ARISS contacts with school kids on Earth?
  16. Do you sleep better in space or on Earth?
  17. Do you normally rely on computers or human skill for spaceship docking at the ISS?
  18. What are some memorable mascots that have been brought up to the ISS?
  19. What unusual weather on Earth have you seen from space?
  20. What class or extracurricular activity inspired you the most to become an astronaut?
    ___________________________

ARISS News Release                                                                 No. 22-49

ARISS Contact is Scheduled with Students at Tarbut College, Olivos, Buenos Aires, Argentina

September 2, 2022—Amateur Radio on the International Space Station (ARISS) has received schedule confirmation for an ARISS radio contact between an astronaut aboard the International Space Station (ISS) and students at Tarbut College located in Buenos Aires.  ARISS conducts 60-80 of these special amateur radio contacts each year between students around the globe and crew members with ham radio licenses aboard the ISS.

Tarbut College is a bilingual Jewish institution located in Buenos Aires, Argentina. It was founded in 1961 and has a student enrollment for Kindergarten up to Secondary grade School. Spanish, English and Hebrew are taught throughout the complete academic journey of every student. For this ARISS contact, the school has extended their existing curriculum on Space during the past 2 years to include classes about the ISS, ISS missions, and ISS communication. A dedicated weekly period for the students included classes about the Earth, space, space exploration history, space station life, satellites and radio communication. The members of the Radio Club Argentino are supporting the college during this ARISS contact.

This will be a direct contact via Amateur Radio and students will take turns asking their questions of Astronaut Kjell Lindgren, amateur radio call sign KO5MOS. Local Covid-19 protocols are adhered to as applicable for each ARISS contact. The downlink frequency for this contact is 145.800 MHZ and may be heard by listeners that are within the ISS-footprint that also encompasses the relay ground station.

The amateur radio ground station for this contact is in Buenos Aires, Argentina. Amateur radio operators using call sign LU4AA, will operate the ground station to establish and maintain the ISS connection.

The ARISS radio contact is scheduled for September 5, 2022 at 11:47 am ART (Buenos Aires) (14:47:39 UTC, 10:47 am EDT, 9:47 am CDT, 8:47 am MDT, 7:47 am PDT).
________________________
As time allows, students will ask these questions:

  1. How did you prepare to be an astronaut and go into the International Space Station?
  2. Could you tell us how you traveled from Earth to the International Space Station? What did you feel during this trip?
  3. Do you have windows inside the spaceship? What can you see from up there when you look at the Earth?
  4. Can you see other planets from there? And what do the stars look like from the ISS?
  5. How do you know where the ISS is supposed to be going when you are in space? Is there a pilot?
  6. Is it cold in space?
  7. How often do you have to fix something in the ISS? And what kind of tools do you have?
  8. Could you tell us a little bit about the experiments you and the rest of the crew are working on?
  9. What do you do if you do not feel well or if you are hurt? Do you have a doctor in space? Do you have some kind of medicine to feel better?
  10. Can you contact your family and friends from the ISS? How often do you talk to them and how do you do it?
  11. What did you take with you into the ISS? Did you take any personal items like pictures, a cell phone or games?
  12. Do you feel different as a person after being in the ISS? Do you think this experience changed you in any way?
  13. Which one is better? Living with gravity or without gravity?
  14. After being in the ISS and seeing space, do you think there is life somewhere outside of Earth?
  15. How do you think your body will react when you get back to Earth?
  16. Do you have plans for your future, after this expedition?
    ___________________________

ARISS News Release                                                                    No. 22-48

ARISS Contact is Scheduled with Students at Monroe Carell Jr. Children’s Hospital (at Vanderbilt University Medical Center) and Seacrest Studios, Nashville, Tennessee, USA

August 22, 2022—Amateur Radio on the International Space Station (ARISS) has received schedule confirmation for an ARISS radio contact between astronauts aboard the International Space Station (ISS) and students (patients) at Monroe Carell Jr. Children’s Hospital located in Nashville, TN.  ARISS conducts 60-80 of these special amateur radio contacts each year between students around the globe and crew members with ham radio licenses aboard the ISS.

Monroe Carell Jr. Children’s Hospital’s School Program and Seacrest Studios strive to provide an atmosphere of normalization for children that are undergoing treatment by working with the patient’s local school (for students in kindergarten through 12th grade) to provide support for their academic needs. These young patients might be hospitalized for several weeks due to an acute medical need or routinely come to the hospital for short, intermittent stays for specific treatment.  Seacrest Studios (located inside the hospital) is a closed-circuit, multi-media broadcast center envisioned and built by the Ryan Seacrest Foundation, an organization dedicated to enhancing the hospital experience for these children while inspiring them through entertainment and education-focused initiatives. The Studios provide programming (including STEM-based programs) that instructs, inspires, and engages patients.  In preparation for this ARISS contact, the hospital created a unit of study focused on space exploration and HAM radio technology that provided a progression of activities throughout the year.  Members of the Vanderbilt University Amateur Radio Club (VUARC) and the Williamson County Amateur Radio Group have partnered with the hospital by providing students with hands-on lessons in ham radio/ radio technology and amateur radio station operation during this ARISS radio contact.

This will be a direct contact via Amateur Radio and students will take turns asking their questions of Astronaut Kjell Lindgren, amateur radio call sign KO5MOS. Local Covid-19 protocols are adhered to as applicable for each ARISS contact. The downlink frequency for this contact is 145.800 MHZ and may be heard by listeners that are within the ISS-footprint that also encompasses the relay ground station.

The amateur radio ground station for this contact is in Nashville, TN. Amateur radio operators using call sign N4FR, will operate the ground station to establish and maintain the ISS connection.

The ARISS radio contact is scheduled for August 24, 2022 at 12:42:54 pm CDT (Nashville, TN) (17:42:54 UTC, 1:42 pm EDT, 11:42 am MDT, 10:42 am PDT).
_____________________
As time allows, students will ask these questions:

  1. How does being away from your family for long periods of time affect you while you’re in space?
  2. How much do you talk to your family?
  3. Can your family and friends send care packages or food?
  4. What happens if you get sick in space?
  5. Since I have cystic fibrosis, would being on a space station affect my lungs?
  6. Has anything happened that you felt might be caused by aliens?
  7. What does it feel like when you launch into space?
  8. How does it feel to re-enter the atmosphere, and does it affect you at all?
  9. Can you see a storm (hurricane) develop in space?
  10. What do the stars look like being unhindered by the atmosphere?
  11. Is time in space different than time here on Earth (days and nights)?
  12. How many days does it take to make it to space from earth?
  13. What is it like in space and can I go with you guys?
  14. Why is Pluto not considered a planet?
  15. How high can you fly in the sky?
  16. How is your reception?
  17. How do you sleep without floating away?
  18. What happens when you run out of food?
  19. How long does it take to get to Mars?
  20. How big is the rocket in person?
    ______________________

ARISS News Release                                                                        No. 22-47

ARISS Contact is Scheduled with Students at Cambridge Public Library and Idea Exchange, Cambridge, Ontario, Canada

August 15, 2022—Amateur Radio on the International Space Station (ARISS) has received schedule confirmation for an ARISS radio contact between astronauts aboard the International Space Station (ISS) and Canadian students at the Cambridge Public Library located in Cambridge, ON.  ARISS conducts 60-80 of these special amateur radio contacts each year between students around the globe and crew members with ham radio licenses aboard the ISS.

The Cambridge Public Library through Idea Exchange is dedicated to creating an environment of curiosity and discovery, inspiring lifelong learning, reading and creativity for the community at six locations across the City of Cambridge. Prior to this ARISS contact the library has provided a variety of STEAM activities centered around space, science, and engineering geared toward children in kindergarten – grade six. Members of the Cambridge Amateur Radio Club are supporting the library during this ARISS contact.

This will be a direct contact via Amateur Radio allowing students to ask their questions of Astronaut Kjell Lindgren, amateur radio call sign KO5MOS. Local Covid-19 protocols are adhered to as applicable for each ARISS contact. The downlink frequency for this contact is 145.800 MHZ and may be heard by listeners that are within the ISS-footprint that also encompasses the relay ground station.

The amateur radio ground station for this contact is in Cambridge, ON, Canada. Amateur radio operators using call sign VE3SWA, will operate the ground station to establish and maintain the ISS connection.

The ARISS radio contact is scheduled for August 18, 2022 at 1:45 pm EDT (ON, CAN) (17:45 UTC, 12:45 pm CDT, 11:45 am MDT, 10:45 am PDT).

The public is invited to watch the live stream at: https://www.youtube.com/c/CambridgeIdeaExchange
__________________________
As time allows, students will ask these questions:

  1. How long does it take an astronaut to go to space?
  2. Is space fun?
  3. Has anybody been to Pluto yet?
  4. How fast does a rocket go?
  5. How does the spaceship not hit asteroids in space?
  6. Is the sun yellow or white?
  7. What is your favourite planet?
  8. How do you sleep in space?
  9. Do you like the food here or in space better?
  10. How do you stay happy?
  11. Do you miss your family?
  12. Is there candy in space?
  13. What do you do if you are feeling bored?
  14. What is your favourite thing you have seen in space?
  15. How do you go to the washroom in space?
  16. How long are you in space for?
  17. How do you eat? Does it just float away?
  18. How big is the engine of a spaceship?
    _____________________

ARISS News Release                                                                        No. 22-45

ARISS Contact is Scheduled with Summer Camp Students at Kopernik Observatory & Science Center, Vestal, New York, USA

August 7, 2022—Amateur Radio on the International Space Station (ARISS) has received schedule confirmation for an ARISS radio contact between astronauts aboard the International Space Station (ISS) and students at the Kopernik Observatory & Science Center located in Vestal, New York.  ARISS conducts 60-80 of these special amateur radio contacts each year between students around the globe and crew members with ham radio licenses aboard the ISS.

Opened in 1974, The Kopernik Observatory & Science Center (KOSC) is a non-profit informal educational institution that promotes interdisciplinary education in the fields of Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM). Through its classes, events and programs, KOSC has offered hundreds of thousands of students of all ages the opportunity to engage and actively learn a variety of STEM subjects. KOSC’s resources include three permanent telescopes, a heliostat, weather station, three classrooms, computer lab, portable planetarium and an amateur radio station. KOSC is also the home of the Kopernik Astronomical Society, the local astronomy club, and the Binghamton Amateur Radio Association (BARA) (callsign W2OW). KOSC offers an outreach program to the local schools, and a STEM-based, summer camp for students between 2nd and 12th grades. This year is the 30th KOSC summer STEM camps, and in preparation for the ARISS contact, one camp, entitled “Welcome Aboard the ISS”, showed 5th and 6th grade students what it takes to become an astronaut, how astronauts train for a mission and what research is being done on the ISS. Students are also learning about satellite orbits and radio communication. Camp activities include building a tape measure 2-meter, 3-element yagi antenna and how to use it during a Fox Hunt. Students also learned about Software Defined Receivers (SDRs) by listening to communications accessed via SDRs online. Students also create and decode images using Slow Scan TV (SSTV), including pre-recorded SSTV images sent by the ISS. BARA members are supporting Kopernik Observatory staff in the set up and operation of the amateur radio station during the ARISS contact.

This will be a direct contact via Amateur Radio allowing students to ask their questions of Astronaut Bob Hines, amateur radio call sign KI5RQT. Local Covid-19 protocols are adhered to as applicable for each ARISS contact. The downlink frequency for this contact is 145.800 MHZ and may be heard by listeners that are within the ISS-footprint that also encompasses the relay ground station.

The amateur radio ground station for this contact is in Vestal, N.Y., USA. Amateur radio operators using call sign K2ZRO, will operate the ground station to establish and maintain the ISS connection.

The ARISS radio contact is scheduled for August 10, 2022 at 12:11 pm EDT (New York) (16:11UTC, 11:11 am CDT, 10:11 am MDT, 9:11 am PDT).

The public is invited to watch the live stream at:  https://youtu.be/2Vf_ZnYc8Cs
_____________________________
As time allows, students will ask these questions:

  1. What was going through your mind going from earth to space?
  2. How do you stay in touch with your family so they know you’re ok?
  3. How does a magnet act in space?
  4. What do you do for fun activities?
  5. After a long journey in space, how long did it take for you to learn how to walk again?
  6. What does the Earth look like from the space station?
  7. Who is your role model?
  8. What was your favorite moment in space
  9. How do you prevent sickness in space and if you get sick, how is it treated?
  10. What kind of experiments do you perform on the International Space Station and how would these experiments be different in gravity?
  11. What does it feel like to be weightless?
  12. What is the coolest/craziest thing you have seen from up there?
  13. Can you see the aurora from the ISS and take pictures of it?
  14. Do astronauts play music instruments in the space station?
  15. What is your favorite part of being in the ISS?
  16. I read that water and oxygen is recycled on the ISS. How much total water and oxygen is needed per astronaut in space?
  17. How can I be an astronaut like you?
  18. What is the most challenging thing about leaving your family for space?
  19. What special exercises do they have to do to stay healthy in space?
    _______________________

ARISS News Release                                                                        No. 22-44

ARISS Contact is Scheduled with Scouts at The Swiss National Scout Jamboree in the Goms Valley, Urlichen Switzerland

August 1, 2022—Amateur Radio on the International Space Station (ARISS) has received schedule confirmation for an ARISS radio contact between an astronaut aboard the International Space Station (ISS) and Swiss scouts at their national scout jamboree occurring in Goms Valley.  ARISS conducts 60-80 of these special amateur radio contacts each year between students around the globe and crew members with ham radio licenses aboard the ISS.

The Swiss Guide and Scout Movement, Bern, Switzerland is hosting this ARISS contact for scouts that are attending the two-week-long Swiss national scout jamboree MOVA in the Goms Valley. About 35,000 scouts participate in this jamboree, coming from all over the country. This ARISS contact will have an audience consisting of male and female scouts and leaders, ages ranging between 7 and 28 years with various educational levels and STEM disciplines. Scouts will be participating in radio workshops (radio propagation and radio operation) during the jamboree. These workshops include Earth-Moon-Earth communication, and space communication technology. In the days that led up to the ISS contact, scouts have participated in demonstrations of amateur radio on the HF, VHF, and UHF ham bands that included their participated in amateur radio traffic. English, French, Italian and German are the languages expected to be used during the contact.

This will be a direct contact via Amateur Radio allowing students to ask their questions of Astronaut Samantha Cristoforetti, amateur radio call sign IZØUDF. Local Covid-19 protocols are adhered to as applicable for each ARISS contact. The downlink frequency for this contact is 145.800 MHZ and may be heard by listeners that are within the ISS-footprint that also encompasses the relay ground station.

The amateur radio ground station for this contact is in Goms Valley near Urlichen, Switzerland. Amateur radio operators using call sign HB9JAM, will operate the ground station to establish and maintain the ISS connection.

The ARISS radio contact is scheduled for August 3, 2022 at 2:23 pm CEST (Switzerland) (12:23:28 UTC, 8:23 am EDT, 7:23 am CDT, 6:23 am MDT, 5:23 am PDT).

The public is invited to watch the live stream at: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCq64C8qJD-okYt-b_nwKUjA  and https://www.mova.ch/it/radio.

As time allows, students will ask these questions:

  1. Are present ISS crew members in scouts?
  2. Kann man das Lagergelände von da oben sehen?
  3. À quelle fréquence êtes vous ravitaillés en aliments et boissons?
  4. Questa e’ la tua seconda missione, ce ne sara’ una terza?
  5. How do you prepare your meals?
  6. Was passiert bei einem medizinischen Notfall?
  7. Que ressentez-vous en voyant la Terre de loin et cela a-t-il changé votre vision de l’humanité ?
  8. Com’e’ stato indossare per la prima volta una tuta spaziale? E’ accogliente?
  9. Is it hard to sleep in Zero G?
  10. Wie redundant sind die Lebenserhaltungssysteme in einem Raumanzug?
  11. Est-il difficile de manger en apesanteur?
  12. Come si rinnuova l’aria sulla ISS?
  13. What is the coolest thing you can see from the ISS?
  14. Haben Sie Freizeit? Was machen Sie in Ihrer Freizeit?
  15. Les déchets sont-ils recyclés sur l’ISS?
  16. Cosa ne pensi del turismo spaziale?
  17. How much energy do the solar panels produce?
  18. Was für ein Funkgerät benutzen Sie um mit uns zu sprechen?
  19. Quelle est la chose la plus intéressante que vous avez faite sur l’ISS?
  20. Ti piacerebbe volare sulla Luna?

Translation:

  1. Are present ISS crew members in scouts?
  2. Can you see the camp grounds from up there?
  3. How often are you supplied with food and drink?
  4. This is your second mission, will there be a third?
  5. How do you prepare your meals?
  6. What happens in a medical emergency?
  7. How do you feel seeing the Earth from afar and has it changed your view of humanity?
  8. What was it like wearing a spacesuit for the first time? Is it comfortable?
  9. Is it hard to sleep in Zero G?
  10. How redundant are the life support systems in a space suit?
  11. Is it difficult to eat in weightlessness?
  12. How is the air renewed on the ISS?
  13. What is the coolest thing you can see from the ISS?
  14. Do you have free time? What are you doing in your spare time?
  15. Is waste recycled on the ISS?
  16. What do you think about space tourism?
  17. How much energy do the solar panels produce?
  18. What radio are you using to speak to us?
  19. What’s the most interesting thing you’ve done on the ISS?
  20. Would you like to fly to the Moon?
    ________________________________

ARISS News Release                                                                       No. 22-43

ARISS Contact is Scheduled with Summer Camp Students at Several Challenger Learning Centers, including the Buehler Challenger & Science Center, Paramus, New Jersey, USA

July 25, 2022—Amateur Radio on the International Space Station (ARISS) has received schedule confirmation for an ARISS radio contact between an astronaut aboard the International Space Station (ISS) and students at various Challenger Learning Centers located in six different states in the U.S.  ARISS conducts 60-80 of these special amateur radio contacts each year between students around the globe and crew members with ham radio licenses aboard the ISS.

The Challenger Learning Center organization is a not-for-profit education organization, established by families of the Challenger STS-51L Crew. The Centers use space-themed simulated learning and role-playing strategies to help students bring their STEM (science, technology, engineering and mathematics) classroom studies to life. This organization reaches hundreds of thousands of students, and tens of thousands of teachers every year through its network of Challenger Centers. The Buehler Challenger & Science Center, in Paramus, New Jersey has coordinated this ARISS contact with seven Science Centers in six U.S. states, and seven cities, which will allow students at each Center to ask a question during the contact.

Those participating Challenger Centers are:

Buehler (BYOO-ler) Challenger & Science Center – Paramus, NJ
Scobee Education Center – San Antonio, TX
Challenger Learning Center of Maine – Bangor, ME
Town of Ramapo Challenger Learning Center – Airmont, NY
Challenger Learning Center of Northwest Indiana – Hammond, IN
Challenger Learning Center at the Kentucky Science Center – Louisville, KY
Challenger Learning Center of the Twin Tiers Region – Allegany, NY

This will be a Multipoint Telebridge Contact via Amateur Radio allowing students to ask their questions of Astronaut Bob Hines, amateur radio call sign KI5RQT. Local Covid-19 protocols are adhered to as applicable for each ARISS contact. The downlink frequency for this contact is 145.800 MHZ and may be heard by listeners that are within the ISS-footprint that also encompasses the telebridge station.

The ARISS amateur radio ground station (telebridge station) for this contact is in Glenden, Queensland, Australia. The amateur radio volunteer team at the ground station will use the callsign VK4KHZ, to establish and maintain the ISS connection.

The ARISS radio contact is scheduled for July 28, 2022 at 12:14 pm EDT (New Jersey) (16:14 UTC, 11:14 am CDT, 10:14 am MDT, 9:14 am PDT).

The public is invited to watch the live stream at: https://www.youtube.com/user/ccsse
______________________________________
As time allows, students will ask these questions:

  1. What life experience do you think helped prepare you for being an astronaut?
  2. What training prepared you for living in smaller spaces for long periods of time in space?
  3. Going to space must change your perspective of the world. What is your favorite experience from living in space you like to tell your family and friends?
  4. What does space food taste like?
  5. What do you do when your equipment needs repair while outside the space station?
  6. What is the most beautiful thing in space?
  7. How did it feel for you personally to go to space?
  8. How are the immune cells tested in the Human Immune System Study?
  9. I have a question about the Earth Surface Mineral Dust Source Investigation (EMIT). How does the heating and cooling of the atmosphere happen, and why do we need to monitor this?
  10. Have you ever seen anything funny and/or amusing from space?
  11. Can you put contacts on in space or do you need to wear glasses?
  12. Can you see where day and night are on Earth from space?
  13. What does it feel like on Station with microgravity?
  14. What was the most exciting thing you discovered in space?
  15. Who and what inspired you to go to space and possibly the moon?
  16. What were your emotions when you first stepped on the rocket and knew you were achieving your dreams?
  17. What do you look forward to most when you get home?
  18. I have a hamster named “Donut” and she’s a little brown dream ball of fluff. Do you have any pets and can you take them to space?
  19. How do you communicate with your friends and family while on station?
  20. What was/is the hardest part about being in space?
    ______________

ARISS News Release                                                                       No. 22-42

ARISS Contact is Scheduled with Students at Kitaogura Elementary School, Uji, Japan

July 19, 2022—Amateur Radio on the International Space Station (ARISS) has received schedule confirmation for an ARISS radio contact between an astronaut aboard the International Space Station (ISS) and Japanese students at the Kitaogura Elementary School located in Uji, Japan.  ARISS conducts 60-80 of these special amateur radio contacts each year between students around the globe and crew members with ham radio licenses aboard the ISS.

Kitaogura Elementary School (about 207 students) is celebrating its 50th anniversary this year and will mark it by hosting this ARISS contact for their students who are also interested in amateur radio. Their students’ enthusiasm for the hobby includes fifth grade students who, in 2020, operated a ham station (callsign 8J3YAA/3) that introduced amateur radio to the surrounding community. Members of the amateur radio clubs (KANSAI ARISS PROJECT & JARL Kyoto Club) are supporting the school for this ARISS contact.

This will be a direct contact via Amateur Radio and allow students to ask questions of Astronaut Kjell Lindgren, amateur radio call sign KO5MOS. Local Covid-19 protocols are adhered to as applicable for each ARISS contact. The downlink frequency for this contact is 145.800 MHZ and may be heard by listeners that are within the ISS-footprint that also encompasses the ground station.

The amateur radio ground station for this contact is in Uji, Japan. Amateur radio operators, using call sign 8N35ØK, will operate the ground station to establish and maintain the ISS connection.

The ARISS radio contact is scheduled for July 21, 2022 at 5:38:43 pm JST (Uji, Japan) (8:38:43 UTC, 4:38 am EDT, 3:38 am CDT, 2:38 am MDT, 1:38 am PDT).
__________________________________
As time allows, students will ask these questions:

  1. Why did you want to become an astronaut?
  2. How can I become an astronaut?
  3. What was the most difficult part of your training before going into space?
  4. How did you feel during launch?
  5. How long does it take to get from Earth to the ISS?
  6. Is it hot or cold in space?
  7. How large is the ISS?
  8. Do you have your own room in the ISS?
  9. What is something you wanted to take to space but couldn’t?
  10. How do you eat and drink in space?
  11. Do you have any space food that you eat on special occasions such as your birthday or the last day of a mission?
  12. Is there a bath in the ISS?
  13. How do you sleep in zero gravity?
  14. How do you wash your clothes after changing?
  15. How do you spend your free time?
  16. How do you enjoy amateur radio on the ISS?
  17. What is the most difficult thing to do in space?
  18. What kind of view can you see from the ISS?
  19. When will you come back to the Earth?
  20. If you get used to weightlessness, do you have any problems when you return to Earth?
    ___________________________________

ARISS News Release                                                                        No. 22-41

ARISS Contact is Scheduled with Students at 2nd Sayama group Saitama Council Scouts Association of Japan, Saitama, Japan

July 11, 2022—Amateur Radio on the International Space Station (ARISS) has received schedule confirmation for an ARISS radio contact between an astronaut aboard the International Space Station (ISS) and Japanese scouts in Sayama City.  ARISS conducts 60-80 of these special amateur radio contacts each year between students around the globe and crew members with ham radio licenses aboard the ISS.

2nd Sayama group Saitama Council Scouts Association of Japan will be hosting this ARISS contact for scouts who have been participating in scouting activities including learning about amateur radio, electricity, and space. During this scouting event they will have also hosted an amateur radio licensing class.

This will be a direct contact via Amateur Radio allowing students to ask their questions of Astronaut Kjell Lindgren, amateur radio call sign KO5MOS. Local Covid-19 protocols are adhered to as applicable for each ARISS contact. The downlink frequency for this contact is 145.800 MHZ and may be heard by listeners that are within the ISS-footprint that also encompasses the ground station.

The amateur radio ground station for this contact is in Sayama City, Japan. Amateur radio operators, using call sign 8J1SBS, will operate the ground station to establish and maintain the ISS connection.

The ARISS radio contact is scheduled for July 13, 2022 at 8:57 pm JST (Saitama, Japan) (11:57 UTC, 7:57 am EDT, 6:57 am CDT, 5:57 am MDT, 4:57 am PDT).

The public is invited to watch the live stream at: https://space.sayama.jp
________________________________

As time allows, students will ask these questions:

  1. What does the moon look like from the ISS?
  2. What are the inconvenient points about zero gravity?
  3. What are the good points about zero gravity?
  4. How old were you when you wanted to become an astronaut and why?
  5. What does it feel like to float with zero gravity?
  6. What space food do you like?
  7. Is it difficult to move around in the ISS?
  8. What does a soap bubble look like in space?
  9. Which planet do you like in the solar system?
  10. How do you decide night and day in the ISS?
  11. Can you draw pictures in the ISS?
  12. Do you see any shooting stars from the ISS?
  13. What is your daily routine on the ISS?
  14. Can you change the speed of the ISS?
  15. How heavy is a space suit?
  16. How do you take a bath in the ISS?
    _______________________________

ARISS News Release                                                                         No. 22-40

ARISS Contact is Scheduled with Students at Il Cielo Itinerante c/o The Center for Space Geodesy of the Italian Space Agency (ASI) in Matera, Italy

July 11, 2022—Amateur Radio on the International Space Station (ARISS) has received schedule confirmation for an ARISS radio contact between an astronaut aboard the International Space Station (ISS) and students at the ASI Center for Space Geodesy in Matera, Italy.  ARISS conducts 60-80 of these special amateur radio contacts each year between students around the globe and crew members with ham radio licenses aboard the ISS.

Il Cielo Itinerante is an Italian non-profit association founded in 2021 by Ersilia Vaudo, Alessia Mosca, Giovanna Dell’Erba and Giulia Morando with the goal of providing STEM classes to disadvantaged children with ages ranging from 9 to 14 years. The association is hosting this ARISS contact for students from various Italian cities. They also visit all the regions of Italy to bring to students, where the need is greatest, practical science laboratories and guided observations of the sky with professional telescopes.    

This will be a telebridge Contact via Amateur Radio allowing students to ask their questions of Astronaut Samantha Cristoforetti, amateur radio call sign IZØUDF. Local Covid-19 protocols are adhered to as applicable for each ARISS contact. The downlink frequency for this contact is 145.800 MHZ and may be heard by listeners that are within the ISS-footprint that also encompasses the telebridge station.

The ARISS amateur radio ground station (telebridge station) for this contact is in Greenbelt, Maryland, U.S. The amateur radio volunteer team at the ground station will use the callsign K6DUE, to establish and maintain the ISS connection.

The ARISS radio contact is scheduled for July 13, 2022 at 11:11 am CEST (Matera, Italy) (9:11 UTC, 5:11 am EDT, 4:11 am CDT, 3:11 am MDT, 2:11 am PDT).
_______________________________

As time allows, students will ask these questions:

  1. Hai acquisito abitudini, durante l’addestramento e le missioni, che ti sono tornate utili nella vita quotidiana?
  2. Cosa si prova di fronte alla consapevolezza di essere entrati nella storia?
  3. Sulla ISS, senza i benefici della luce del Sole, assumete la vitamina D in pillole o negli alimenti?
  4. Dalla ISS si ha percezione di segnali legati al cambiamento climatico?
  5. Cosa ne pensi del turismo spaziale? Un’occasione per l’umanita’ o un privilegio per pochi?
  6. Negli ultimi anni stiamo avendo un’evoluzione green nei mezzi di trasporto. E’ cambiato qualcosa da questo punto di vista nei voli spaziali?
  7. Ad oggi sei l’unica donna italiana ad essere andata nello Spazio. Sono aumentate in Italia le donne candidate al bando per diventare astronauta?
  8. Come fate a regolare le diverse fasi del giorno nello Spazio e a distinguere il di’ dalla notte?
  9. Quanto tempo impiega un essere umano ad adattarsi nello spazio?  Hai notato differenze tra uomini e donne?
  10. Come ci si sente a lavorare e condividere lo spazio vitale con gli altri sulla ISS?
  11. Come si trascorrono le serate d’estate nello Spazio? Guardando le stelle seduti attorno ad un falo’?
  12. Sulla ISS disponete di farmaci sintetizzati apposta per gli atronauti per patologie e malesseri non comuni sulla Terra?
  13. Come e’ nata la tua passione per i viaggi nello spazio?
  14. Quali prove hai dovuto affrontare per diventare una astronauta?
  15. In assenza di peso l’odore e il gusto sono percepiti allo stesso modo?
  16. L’atmosfera della Terra ci protegge da molti pericoli provenienti dallo spazio, e’ pensabile una missione su Marte dove l’atmosfera e’ estremamente rarefatta?
  17. Quanto tempo ci e’ voluto per arrivare dalla Terra alla ISS dove siete ora?
  18. Come fate a riabituarvi alla gravita’ quando tornate sulla Terra?
  19. Cosa puoi dirci dell’esperimento Ovospace?
  20. Da tempo siamo alla ricerca di altri pianeti abitabili. Pensi sara’ possibile in futuro viaggiare a velocità piu’ elevate di quelle attuali?

Translation

  1. Did you acquire habits during training and missions that have become useful in your daily life?
  2. How do you feel when you are aware of having entered the history?
  3. On the ISS, without the benefits of sunlight, do you get vitamin D in pills or food?
  4. Is there any perception of signals related to climate change from the ISS?
  5. What do you think about space tourism? An opportunity for human kind or a privilege for a few?
  6. In recent years we have been experiencing a green evolution in means of transport. Has anything changed from this point of view in space flights?
  7. To date, you are the only Italian woman who flew in space. Have women candidates for the call to become an astronaut increased in Italy?
  8. How do you manage phases of the day in Space and how to distinguish between the day and the night?
  9. How long does it take a human to adapt to space?  Have you noticed any differences between adaptation for men and women?
  10. How does it feel working with and sharing living space with others on ISS? 
  11. How do you spend summer evenings in Space? Looking at the stars sitting around a bonfire?
  12. Do you have drugs synthesized on the ISS especially for astronauts for diseases not common on Earth?
  13. How was your passion for space travel born?
  14. What trials did you face to become an astronaut?
  15. In the absence of weight, are the smell and taste perceived in the same way?
  16. The atmosphere of the Earth protects us from many dangers coming from space, is a mission to Mars where the atmosphere is extremely thin is conceivable?
  17. How long did it take to get from Earth to the ISS where you are now?
  18. How do you get used again to gravity when you return to Earth?
  19. What can you tell us about the Ovospace experiment?
  20. We have been looking for other habitable planets for some time. Do you think it will be possible in the future to travel at higher speeds than today?
    _________________________________

ARISS News Release                                                                         No. 22-38

ARISS Contact is Scheduled with Students at the Eaton Public Library, Eaton, Colorado, USA

June 17, 2022—Amateur Radio on the International Space Station (ARISS) has received schedule confirmation for an ARISS radio contact between astronauts aboard the International Space Station (ISS) and students at the Eaton Public Library located in Eaton, CO.  ARISS conducts 60-80 of these special amateur radio contacts each year between students around the globe and crew members with ham radio licenses aboard the ISS.

The Eaton Public Library serves the rural community of Eaton, Colorado by providing programs, speakers and events for students and adults. These programs also include STEM projects and activities that can be accommodated in their newly added Makerspace facility. The library partnered with area schools and hosted a Space Camp STEM activity for students. The Space Camp featured studies about space, radio, and different STEM activities that allowed kids to engage in hands-on learning. The kids also learned about the ISS and the astronauts on board. After conducting a full-dress rehearsal of their ARISS contact with the Eaton Library team and students, ARISS Technical Mentor Fred Kemmerer said: “The excitement and interest level among the kids and their parents is high as they anticipate making their ARISS contact.” By offering STEM programs, and sponsoring events like this ARISS contact, the library provides the community with opportunities to expand their worldview and gain new experiences they might not get anywhere else.

This will be a telebridge Contact via Amateur Radio allowing participants to ask their questions of Astronaut Kjell Lindgren, amateur radio call sign KO5MOS. Local Covid-19 protocols are adhered to as applicable for each ARISS contact. The downlink frequency for this contact is 145.800 MHZ and may be heard by listeners that are within the ISS-footprint that also encompasses the telebridge station.

The ARISS amateur radio ground station (telebridge station) for this contact is in Hollis, New Hampshire, U.S.. The amateur radio volunteer team at the ground station will use the callsign AB1OC, to establish and maintain the ISS connection.

The ARISS radio contact is scheduled for June 22, 2022 at 10:27 am MDT (Eaton, CO) (16:27UTC, 12:27 pm EDT, 11:27 am CDT, 9:27 am PDT).

The public is invited to watch the live stream at: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=81zMIvrAnLU
______________________________

As time allows, students will ask these questions:

  1. What time zone do you follow in space?
  2. How do you grow plants on the space station?
  3. If you could visit any planet, which one would you visit and why?
  4. How does your body feel in space?
  5. What does space food taste like?
  6. How did you become an astronaut?
  7. What types of experiments are done on the space station?
  8. How often do you receive supplies?
  9. How do you get to and from the space station?
  10. What happens if you get lost in space?
  11. How do I prepare for becoming an astronaut?
  12. Do you get to communicate with your family or loved ones on Earth while in space?
  13. Have you or your teammates done a spacewalk?
  14. How many flight hours do you have?
  15. What’s your favorite thing about space?
  16. How many solar systems are in the universe?
  17. What is one scary time you had in space?
  18. How many sunrises/sunsets can you see?
  19. How long does it take to get used to zero gravity?
  20. What was your favorite mission you’ve been on?
  21. How do you get your water?
  22. How many times have you been to space?
    _________________________________

ARISS News Release                                                                         No. 22-37

ARISS Contact is Scheduled with Students at Istituto Tecnico Industrile “Alessandro Rossi”, Vicenza, Veneto, Italy

June 10, 2022—Amateur Radio on the International Space Station (ARISS) has received schedule confirmation for an ARISS radio contact between astronauts aboard the International Space Station (ISS) and Italian students at the Industrial Technical Institute “Alessandro Rossi”, located in Vicenza, Veneto.  ARISS conducts 60-80 of these special amateur radio contacts each year between students around the globe and crew members with ham radio licenses aboard the ISS.

The Technical Institute “Alessandro Rossi” of Vicenza is one of the oldest technical schools in Italy. It was founded in 1876 by the senator and industrialist Alessandro Rossi, who wanted to import the model of the German technical schools into Italy. The institute’s students (ages 14 to 19) can specialize in electrical technology, computer science, telecommunications, mechanics, or chemistry. The telecommunications students, supported by a company created by former students, built the antenna for this contact.

The institute collaborates with lower-middle schools (with students ages 11 to 14) to teach the introduction of robotics and artificial intelligence. Two of these schools have been asked to participate in this ARISS contact:  the “Don Bosco” Comprehensive Institute, in the municipality of Monticello Conte Otto, a few kilometers from the city of Vicenza, and the “Antonio Barolini” Comprehensive Institute, in Vicenza.

This will be a direct contact via Amateur Radio allowing students to ask their questions of Astronaut Samantha Cristoforetti, amateur radio call sign IZØUDF. Local Covid-19 protocols are adhered to as applicable for each ARISS contact. The downlink frequency for this contact is 145.800 MHZ and may be heard by listeners that are within the ISS-footprint that also encompasses the relay ground station.

The amateur radio ground station for this contact is in Vicenza, Veneto, Italy. Amateur radio operators will use call sign I3IRV to establish and maintain the ISS connection.

The ARISS radio contact is scheduled for June 14, 2022 at 12:08:55 pm CEST (Vicenza, ITA) (10:08:55 UTC, 6:08 am EDT, 5:08 am CDT, 4:08 am MDT, 3:08 am PDT).

The public is invited to watch the live stream at: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-DeYw0Fi0xA

As time allows, students will ask these questions:

  1. Guardando dagli oblo’ capita di vedere satelliti artificiali?
  2. Guardando dall’alto la vastita’ e la bellezza dello spazio, ti commuovi da essere umano o ti entusiasmi da scienziato?
  3. Il vostro addestramento in astronautica vi tornera’ utile per la vita quotidiana?
  4. Saresti disposta ad arrivare fino a Marte?
  5. Secondo te e grazie ai tuoi studi, sara’ mai possibile vivere su un altro pianeta?
  6. Era il tuo sogno fin da bambina diventare un’astronauta?
  7. Sulla ISS Il giorno e la notte si alternano come sulla Terra?
  8. Riesci a riassumere in tre parole le sensazioni che provi vedendo la Terra dallo spazio?
  9. Quali effetti fisici e mentali si riscontrano una volta ritornati sulla Terra?
  10. Che cosa pensi dei viaggi commerciali nello spazio?
  11. Hai mai avuto dei momenti in cui ha pensato di lasciar perdere la vita da astronauta? Se si, come hai cambiato idea?
  12. Durante le tue missioni, quali sono state l’esperienza più emozionante e quella piu’ deludente che hai vissuto?
  13. Immagino che il percorso per arrivare dove sei sia stato molto lungo e ricco di ostacoli, come hai trovato la forza di superarli?
  14. Che tipo di difficolta’ hai dovuto gestire durante il tuo percorso professionale?
  15. Dalla ISS potete comunicare con le vostre famiglie?
    _____________________

Translation

  1. Looking from the portholes, do you happen to see artificial satellites?
  2. Looking at the vastness and beauty of space from above, are you moved as a human being or do you get excited as a scientist?
  3. Will your training in astronautics be useful for your daily life?
  4. Would you be willing to go all the way to Mars?
  5. In your opinion and thanks to your studies, will it ever be possible to live on another planet?
  6. Was it your dream since childhood to become an astronaut?
  7. On the ISS, do day and night alternate like on Earth?
  8. Can you summarize in three words the sensations you feel seeing the Earth from space?
  9. What physical and mental effects are experienced upon returning to Earth?
  10. What do you think about commercial space travel?
  11. Have you ever had moments when you thought about giving up your life as an astronaut? If so, how did you change your mind?
  12. During your missions, which were the most exciting and the most disappointing experiences you have had?
  13. I imagine that the path to get to where you are has been very long and full of obstacles, how did you find the strength to overcome them?
  14. What kind of difficulties did you have to manage during your professional career?
  15. Can you communicate with your families from the ISS?
    ___________________________

ARISS News Release                                                                         No. 22-35

ARISS Contact is Scheduled with Students at Scuola media San Pietro, Nuoro, Sardegna, Italy

June 4, 2022—Amateur Radio on the International Space Station (ARISS) has received schedule confirmation for an ARISS radio contact between astronauts aboard the International Space Station (ISS) and Italian students at the Scuola media S. Pietro located in Nuoro, Sardegna.  ARISS conducts 60-80 of these special amateur radio contacts each year between students around the globe and crew members with ham radio licenses aboard the ISS.

San Pietro Primary School is located in “Santu Predu”, one of the oldest neighborhoods in the heart of Nuoro’s old town. With a rich history and cultural heritage, this area is the birth place of Grazia Deledda, Sebastiano Satta and Francesco Ciusa Romagna. The school has partnered with the Nuorese Astronomical Association, which helps students learn about astronomical and terrestrial phenomena using their digital planetarium facilities. Students have also studied data recovered from probes launched to 100,000 feet elevation to study the Earth’s stratosphere. These probes have provided data that help students understand more about the earth’s climate/climate change (weather recordings), the solar cycle, the Earth’s electromagnetic field, and photos/video of their island home. In preparation for this ARISS radio contact students are also learning about the research being conducted on the ISS.  

This will be a direct contact via Amateur Radio allowing students to ask their questions of Astronaut Samantha Cristoforetti, amateur radio call sign IZØUDF. Local Covid-19 protocols are adhered to as applicable for each ARISS contact. The downlink frequency for this contact is 437.525 MHz and may be heard by listeners that are within the ISS-footprint that also encompasses the relay ground station.

The amateur radio ground station for this contact is in Nuoro, Sardegna, Italy. The amateur radio operators at the ground station will use the callsign IKØWGF, to establish and maintain the ISS connection.

The ARISS radio contact is scheduled for June 6, 2022 at 1:43 pm CEST (Nuoro, IT) (11:43 UTC, 7:43 am EDT, 6:43 am CDT, 5:43 am MDT, 4:43 am PDT).

The public is invited to watch the live stream at: https://youtube.com/channel/UCVmGUvZkLAMhErRQQ6AkVMA
_____________________________________

As time allows, students will ask these questions:

  1. Quale esperienza o episodio particolare la indotta a diventare astronauta?
  2. Sei felice all’idea che sei diventata famose in Europa?
  3. Se potesse portare una persona nella ISS, al difuori della sua famiglia, chi porterebbe e perché?
  4. Secondo te c’è più di un sistema solare con altre forme di vita?
  5. Durante l’intera missione Le è capitato di aver paura?
  6. Quale è il suo cantante preferito, Le capita di ascoltare musica a bordo della ISS?
  7. Quale parte dell’addestramento è la più difficile?
  8. Sulla ISS avete anche dei momenti di divertimento?
  9. Tutti da bambini sogniamo di essere astronauti, com’è per lei esserci arrivata, e qual’ è il suo sogno?
  10. Che tipo di esperimenti svolge sulla ISS, e che ricaduta potrebbero avere sulla vita quotidiana?
  11. Vorresti vivere o andare su un altro pianeta se fosse possibile?
  12. Chi guida la stazione spaziale?
  13. Quanto tempo e impegno dedichi alla divulgazione per spingere altre donne nella carriera di astronauta?
  14. Perché il nome della missione Minerva?
  15. Quale messaggio vorresti dare a tutta l’umanità dalla ISS?

Translation

  1. What experience, or particular episode induced you to become an astronaut?
  2. Are you happy with the idea that you have become famous in Europe?
  3. If you could bring a person into the ISS, outside his family, who would he bring and why?
  4. Do you think there is more than one solar system with other forms of life?
  5. During the entire mission did you happened to be afraid?
  6. Who is your favorite singer? Do you happen to listen to music aboard the ISS?
  7. Which part of the training is the most difficult?
  8. Do you have moments of fun on ISS?
  9. As children, we all dream of being astronauts, how is it for you to have arrived there, and what is your dream?
  10. What kind of experiments do you do on ISS, and what impact they might have on daily life?
  11. Would you like to live or go to another planet if it were possible?
  12. Who drives the space station?
  13. How much time and effort do you dedicate to disclosure to push other women into the astronaut career?
  14. Why the name of the Minerva mission?
  15. What message would you like to give to all humanity from the ISS?
    __________________________________

ARISS News Release                                                                        No. 22-34

ARISS Contact is Scheduled with the Matinecock District Boy Scouts, Suffolk County, New York, USA

June 2, 2022—Amateur Radio on the International Space Station (ARISS) has received schedule confirmation for an ARISS radio contact between astronauts aboard the International Space Station (ISS) and the Matinecock District Boy Scouts in Centerport, New York.  ARISS conducts 60-80 of these special amateur radio contacts each year between students around the globe and crew members with ham radio licenses aboard the ISS.

The Boy Scouts of Matinecock District of Suffolk County Council, Boy Scouts of America (BSA), is located in New York on Long Island, and composed of about 52 units made up of youth ages 5-18 years. In addition to teaching youth outdoor skills, the BSA also puts a strong focus on STEM initiatives in several Cub Scout and Scouts BSA activities dealing with the sciences, robotics, engineering, and exploring all aspects of life. The venue provided for this ARISS contact is the Vanderbilt Museum & Planetarium in Centerport, New York, which has hosted events during the previous year in order to foster interest in space and space exploration for the scouts. During the year leading up to this contact, the scouts have been learning through STEM-based projects about the ISS missions, and amateur radio (including morse code practice).

This will be a telebridge Contact via Amateur Radio allowing students to ask their questions of Astronaut Kjell Lindgren, amateur radio call sign KO5MOS. Local Covid-19 protocols are adhered to as applicable for each ARISS contact. The downlink frequency for this contact is 145.800 MHZ and may be heard by listeners that are within the ISS-footprint that also encompasses the telebridge station.

The ARISS amateur radio ground station (telebridge station) for this contact is in Hollis, New Hampshire, U.S.. The amateur radio volunteer team at the ground station will use the callsign AB1OC, to establish and maintain the ISS connection.

The ARISS radio contact is scheduled for June 4, 2022 at 1:56 pm EDT (New York) (17:56 UTC, 12:56 pm CDT, 11:56 am MDT, 10:56 am PDT).
____________________________________________

As time allows, students will ask these questions:

  1. What do you have to study after HS in order to have a career as an Astronaut?
  2. Could the ISS ever be self-sustaining and not need care-packages of food/water/oxygen from Earth?
  3. Are ISS teams only picked based on skills, or does NASA try to match personalities as well?
  4. How does the ISS stay safe from all the “space junk” floating around the Earth?
  5. Do you only do experiments in your field of expertise on the ISS or because of limited resources do you find yourself assisting others doing things you’re not as comfortable with?
  6. Is automated piloting better than manual piloting in terms of flight controls and docking?
  7. What one thing did you do as a young adult that you felt was your first significant step to becoming an astronaut?
  8. I’ve heard being in space can change you taste buds. Have you created any interesting or creative recipes to make space food taste better?
  9. How do they supply the ISS with constant oxygen?
  10. We saw a video of a gorilla suit prank on the ISS a few month ago. Has there been any other funny pranks?
  11. What jobs do you have to do on the ship?
  12. Do the astronauts get to bring something from home with them to space?
  13. I’ve heard astronauts from different countries will trade food. What country has the most popular dish on the ISS?
  14. In your personal opinion, what is the best and least best thing about being on the ISS?
  15. Can you swim in space when you’re floating?
  16. Can you feel the affects being in space has on your body? If so, what’s it like?
  17. Can you yo-yo upside down in space?
  18. Does the ISS have technology installed that could capture Unidentified Aerial Phenomena (UAP)like the US Navy has recently? Have you seen anything up there that you can’t explain?
  19. What does it feel like to go to space?
  20. I read that there was once water on Mars. Where did all the water go?
    _______________________

ARISS News Release                                                                          No. 22-33

ARISS Contact is Scheduled with Students at Istituto Comprensivo “Losapio–S.F. Neri”, Gioia del Colle, Puglia, Italy

June 2, 2022—Amateur Radio on the International Space Station (ARISS) has received schedule confirmation for an ARISS radio contact between astronauts aboard the International Space Station (ISS) and Italian students at the Istituto Comprensivo “Losapio–S.F. Neri” located in Gioia del Colle, Puglia.  ARISS conducts 60-80 of these special amateur radio contacts each year between students around the globe and crew members with ham radio licenses aboard the ISS.

I.C. “Losapio – S.F. Neri”, established in 2012, was formed from the unification of the primary school “S.F. Neri” and the secondary school “Losapio” (1435 students ages 3 to 14 years), and is located in Gioia del Colle. The school has partnered with Cittadella Mediterranea della Scienza, in the neighboring capitol of Bari, whose facilities will be provided as the venue for this ARISS contact. The nearby Gioia del Colle Air Force base has hosted student fieldtrips to their facilities allowing students to learn the many aspects of radio communication and radio equipment. Students have also participated in field trips to Cittadella Mediterranea della Scienza to learn about radio communication equipment, the history of radio, and space-related type communication. Local amateur radio operators are providing support for this ARISS contact.

This will be a direct contact via Amateur Radio allowing students to ask their questions of Astronaut Samantha Cristoforetti, amateur radio call sign IZØUDF. Local Covid-19 protocols are adhered to as applicable for each ARISS contact. The downlink frequency for this contact is 145.800 MHZ and may be heard by listeners that are within the ISS-footprint that also encompasses the relay ground station.

The amateur radio ground station for this contact is in Bari, Italy. Amateur radio operators at the ground station will use call sign IZ7RTN, to establish and maintain the ISS connection.

The ARISS radio contact is scheduled for June 4, 2022 at 1:43 pm CEST (Bari, ITA) (11:43:46 UTC, 7:43 am EDT, 6:43 am CDT, 5:43 am MDT, 4:43 am PDT).

The public is invited to watch the live stream at: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCmfI6IhajshGME8jZTdjBrA
_______________________________
As time allows, students will ask these questions:

  1. Al momento del lancio che cosa ha provato?
  2. Quanto è importante il lavoro di squadra sulla ISS?
  3. Qual è l’esperimento che la sta appassionando maggiormente?
  4. Sappiamo che lei ha portato olio pugliese sulla ISS. Lo sta usando per degli esperimenti? Lo ha assaggiato?
  5. Sulla ISS non esistono né sopra e sotto, né destra e sinistra. Come vi orientate?
  6. Senza l’alternanza del dì e della notte, come viene scandito il tempo?
  7. L’aria viene riciclata? Avete scorte di ossigeno?
  8. Qual è l’impatto dei rifiuti spaziali prodotti dalla ISS?
  9. Sulla ISS come vi rilassate e cosa le piace fare nel tempo libero?
  10. Che tipo di allenamento fisico preferisce a bordo?
  11. Ha in programma una passeggiata extra veicolare?
  12. Durante la sua missione riceverete visite di turisti spaziali?
  13. Secondo lei, sarà davvero possibile fondare una colonia umana sulla Luna o su Marte?
  14. Crede nell’esistenza di altre forme di vita oltre a quelle terrestri?
  15. Guardando la Terra dallo spazio, cosa suscita in lei più emozioni?
  16. È già alla sua seconda missione sulla ISS: si sente più a suo agio sulla Terra o nello spazio?
  17. Le piacerebbe se i suoi figli diventassero astronauta come lei?
  18. Al rientro è facile tornare alle abitudini della vita sulla Terra?
  19. C’è un’abilità acquisita nello spazio che le è stata poi utile sulla Terra?
  20. Qual è l’aspetto che più le piace del suo lavoro?

Translation

  1. What have you felt at the moment of liftoff?
  2. How important is teamwork on ISS?
  3. What is the experiment that you are finding most interesting?
  4. We are aware that you brought on ISS olive oil from Puglia. Are you using it in your experiments? Have you tasted it?
  5. On the ISS there is no up and down, nor right and left. How do you orient yourself?
  6. How do you mark the time on the ISS without the alternation of day and night?
  7. Is air recycled? Do you have a stock of oxygen?
  8. What is the impact on space of the trash produced by the ISS?
  9. How do you relax on the ISS? What do you enjoy doing in your spare time?
  10. What kind of physical exercise do you enjoy performing aboard the ISS?
  11. Do you have any extravehicular activity on schedule?
  12. Will any space tourist visit you during your mission?
  13. Do you believe a human colony will ever be established on Moon or Mars?
  14. Do you believe in the existence of extraterrestrial forms of life?
  15. What strikes you the most when you look at the earth from space?
  16. This is your second mission aboard the ISS: do you feel more comfortable on earth or in space?
  17. Would you be happy if your children chose to become astronauts like you?
  18. Is it easy to adjust to terrestrial habits when back from space?
  19. Is there any skill that you have acquired in space that turned out to be useful on earth?
  20. What is the aspect of your job that you enjoy the most?
    _______________________________

ARISS News Release                                                                             No. 22-32

ARISS Contact is Scheduled with Students at Old St. Mary’s School, Chicago, Illinois, USA

May 29, 2022—Amateur Radio on the International Space Station (ARISS) has received schedule confirmation for an ARISS radio contact between astronauts aboard the International Space Station (ISS) and students at the Old St. Mary’s School located in Chicago, IL.  ARISS conducts 60-80 of these special amateur radio contacts each year between students around the globe and crew members with ham radio licenses aboard the ISS.

Old St. Mary’s School (OSM) (est. 2004) has about 500 students in preschool through eighth grade and is located next to the museum campus, which includes the planetarium, natural history museum, and aquarium.  Old St. Mary’s School, which is sponsored by the Archdiocese of Chicago, began a partnership in 2018 with the Museum of Science and Industry (MSI) in Chicago.  For the last four years, MSI’s Science Leadership School Partners Program has provided support to improve OSM’s science program by developing partnerships and communication with families and stakeholders, and promoting whole-school projects, including this ARISS contact. In preparation for this contact, students have been learning about a wide range of STEM-related topics that address space habitation, our solar system, orbital motions, low gravity conditions, and radio wave properties (including RF digital communications).  Students participate in various hands-on activities that apply an understanding of science, math, and engineering to various types of model building, as well as attending field-trips to the Challenger Learning Center.

This will be a Multipoint Telebridge Contact via Amateur Radio allowing students to ask questions of Astronaut Bob Hines, amateur radio call sign KI5RQT. Local Covid-19 protocols are adhered to as applicable for each ARISS contact. The downlink frequency for this contact is 145.800 MHZ and may be heard by listeners that are within the ISS-footprint that also encompasses the telebridge station.

The ARISS amateur radio ground station (telebridge station) for this contact is in Aartselaar, Belgium. The amateur radio volunteer team at the ground station will use the callsign ON4ISS, to establish and maintain the ISS connection.

The ARISS radio contact is scheduled for May 31, 2022 at 11:32 am CDT (Chicago, IL) (16:32:31UTC, 12:32 pm EDT, 10:32 am MDT, 9:32 am PDT).

The public is invited to watch the live stream at: https://www.osmschool.com/
_____________________________________

As time allows, students will ask these questions:

  1. How does it feel when you are blasting off during the first moments in space?
  2. What is the most satisfying or amazing thing that you’ve seen in space?
  3. Is it lonely being in space away from your family for so long? How do you handle your emotions?
  4. Who is your bestie on the crew?
  5. What personal items did you bring to the ISS?
  6. What is your favorite thing to do in space? Do you play board games or video games?
  7. What has been the most difficult day you have had in space? Why?
  8. What experiments are you working on right now?
  9. What would you do if someone got injured or is sick in space? Is it different than on Earth?
  10. Has anyone baked cookies in space? If so, is it easier or harder? Do you have a favorite type of cookie?
  11. What is the best meal in space?
  12. Why did you want to become an astronaut?
    _______________________________

ARISS News Release                                                                              No. 22-31

ARISS Contact is Scheduled with Students at Mindshub Associazione Promozione Sociale (APS) with Istituto Comprensivo Avio, Ala, Trento, Italy

May 26, 2022—Amateur Radio on the International Space Station (ARISS) has received schedule confirmation for an ARISS radio contact between astronauts aboard the International Space Station (ISS) and students at the Istituto Comprensivo AVIO, located in Ala, Trento, Italy.  ARISS conducts 60-80 of these special amateur radio contacts each year between students around the globe and crew members with ham radio licenses aboard the ISS.

The Mindshub APS [social promotion association] was founded in 2016 with the aim of creating a “2.0 laboratory” where boys and girls could experiment in the fields of electronics, robotics, information technology and 3D printing. Mindshub APS (Mindshub) involves about 40 secondary, high school and university students aged 11 to 24 years.  For this ARISS contact, Mindshub has partnered with Istituto Comprensivo AVIO (337 students ages 6 to 13 years) to provide this opportunity for students to communicate with the ISS. During this project, this collaboration with Mindshub has provided student workshops and STEAM-related activities. Mindshub has a team of volunteers that help with these student activities which have included astronomical observing, and model rocket building (based on their study of the Vega rocket). The students involved in this ARISS contact are part of the school Parliament and participate in the Problem Solving Olympics, where they experiment with computational thinking.

This will be a telebridge Contact via Amateur Radio and students will take turns asking their questions of Astronaut Samantha Cristoforetti, amateur radio call sign IZØUDF. Local Covid-19 protocols are adhered to as applicable for each ARISS contact. The downlink frequency for this contact is 145.800 MHZ and may be heard by listeners that are within the ISS-footprint that also encompasses the telebridge station.

The ARISS amateur radio ground station (telebridge station) for this contact is in Paardekraal, South Africa. The amateur radio volunteer team at the ground station will use the callsign ZS6JON, to establish and maintain the ISS connection.

The ARISS radio contact is scheduled for May 28, 2022 at 11:03:47 am CEST (Trento, Italy) (09:03:47 UTC, 5:03 am EDT, 4:03 am CDT, 3:03 am MDT, 2:03 am PDT).

Live streaming will be available at https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCovvk_auow3UUxEuRDVk1GA and https://www.facebook.com/mindshub.it
__________________________

As time allows, students will ask these questions:

  1. Come vi connettete ad Internet? Avete orari specifici per poterlo fare?
  2. Crew Dragon e le tute di Spacex sono molto diverse dalle precedenti spedizioni, offrono piu’ comfort durante il viaggio?
  3. Come fate ad esercitare il diritto di voto?
  4. L’assenza di peso influisce sul fabbisogno energetico? Come differisce l’alimentazione nello spazio?
  5. Usate energia nucleare o fate esperimenti con questo tipo di alimentazione?
  6. Esiste una misura di quanto lo spazio sia sfruttato dall’uomo? E con quali risorse?
  7. C’e’ qualche speranza di vederti sulla Luna con il programma Artemis dopo la ISS?
  8. Hai qualche esperimento da proporci, magari che stai facendo, e che possiamo riprodurre nella nostra scuola?
  9. Dalla Terra alla ISS la Dragon e’ totalmente automatica o esistono manovre manuali? Se si, sei addestrata ad eseguirle?
  10. C’e’ un limite di tempo per operare in attivita’ extraveicolare, dal momento che si è piu’ esposti alle radiazioni?
  11. Sulla ISS fai sogni diversi che sulla Terra? Sogni di muoveri in microgravita’ o a gravita’ terrestre?
  12. Avete filtri speciali alle finestre per osservare il Sole? E di notte quanto è luminosa la Terra?
  13. Le mappe terrestri, essendo planari, non rappresentano correttamente le proporzioni delle terre emerse. Questa differenza e’ visibile ad occhio nudo?
  14. Avete provato a far crescere delle piantine nello spazio? Come crescono le radici?
  15. Il vento solare ha effetti sul DNA umano? Se si, come vi difendete?
  16. Nell’esperimento EVOO, fra gli olii utilizzati negli esperimenti, e’ presente anche l’olio del Garda?
  17. Quale potrebbe essere il futuro desiderabile per la ISS?
  18. Sono cambiati i tuoi obiettivi personali tra la prima e la seconda missione?
  19. Sulla ISS ti e’ mai capitato di usare la stampante 3D per sostituire qualche componente?
  20. Ogni quanto viene corretta l’ orbita della ISS? Ha motori propri o usa quelli delle Dragon e Soyuz?
  21. In una giornata, quanto tempo e’ dedicato a esperimenti, manutenzione e tempo libero? Avete giorni di ferie?

Translation

  1. Do you have Internet access on the ISS? Do you have specific times to use it?
  2. Crew Dragon and SpaceX’s suits are very different from previous expeditions, do they offer more comfort?
  3. How do you exercise your right to vote?
  4. Does weightlessness affect energy needs? How does the feeding differ in space?
  5. Do you use nuclear energy or do you experiment with this type of power supply?
  6. Is there an estimation how much the space is exploited by humans? And with which resources?
  7. Is there any chance to see you on the Moon with the Artemis program after the ISS?
  8. Is there any experiments to propose, maybe that you’re performing, that we can reproduce in our school?
  9. From the Earth to the ISS is the Dragon totally automatic or are there manual maneuvers? If so, are you trained to do them?
  10. Is there a time limit to operate in extravehicular activities, since you are more exposed to radiation?
  11. Do you have different dreams on the ISS than on Earth? Do you dream of moving in microgravity or in terrestrial gravity?
  12. Do you have special filters on the windows to observe the Sun? And how bright is the Earth at night?
  13. The terrestrial maps, being 2D, do not correctly represent the proportions of the emerged lands. Is this difference visible from the ISS?
  14. Have you tried growing plants in space? How do roots grow?
  15. Does the solar wind affect human DNA? If so, how do you protect yourself?
  16. In the EVOO experiment, is oil from Garda also present among the oils used in the experiments?
  17. What could be the desirable future for the ISS?
  18. Did your personal goals changed between the first and second missions?
  19. On the ISS, have you ever used the 3D printer to replace some component?
  20. How often is the orbit of the ISS corrected? Does it have its own engines or does it use those of the Dragon and Soyuz?
  21. In a day, how much time is dedicated to experiments, maintenance and free time? Do you have days off?
    _____________________

ARISS News Release                                                                                 No. 22-30

ARISS Contact is Scheduled with Students at Forum Accademico Italiano e.V., Köln, Germany

May 18, 2022—Amateur Radio on the International Space Station (ARISS) has received schedule confirmation for an ARISS radio contact between astronauts aboard the International Space Station (ISS) and Italian students at three schools in Germany and one school in Firenze, Italy. ARISS conducts 60-80 of these special amateur radio contacts each year between students around the globe and crew members with ham radio licenses aboard the ISS.

The Forum Accademico Italiano e.V. (Cologne), is an association created to encourage interaction among Italian scientists based in Germany with those scientists within the local Italian community, with special attention to Italian children attending German schools. The Forum Accademico Italiano organized this ARISS contact event (Project) with the aim of building a bridge between young students and scientists with a common interest in science, space and human spaceflight. The Project is strongly interdisciplinary and directed to develop different skills: language, communication and critical thinking. The languages used in the Project are Italian, German and English. Schools participating in this event include three schools in Germany: Am Zugweg School in Cologne, Friedrich Wilhelm Gymnasium in Cologne, HerkunftSpracheUnterricht in Bedburg/Elsdorf, and the Istituto San Giuseppe in Firenze, Italy. Participating students range in ages 10 -16 years and have engaged in various STEM subjects to understand the role of space exploration in society and what it means to be an astronaut. Members of the European Astronaut Centre of the European Space Agency in Cologne are helping with the preparation and implementation of this Project as well as sharing their expertise and knowledge in the field of Human Spaceflight.

This will be a telebridge Contact via Amateur Radio allowing students to ask their questions of Astronaut Samantha Cristoforetti, amateur radio call sign IZØUDF. Local Covid-19 protocols are adhered to as applicable for each ARISS contact. The downlink frequency for this contact is 145.800 MHZ and may be heard by listeners that are within the ISS-footprint that also encompasses the telebridge station.

The ARISS amateur radio ground station (telebridge station) for this contact is in Paardekraal, South Africa. The amateur radio volunteer team at the ground station will use the callsign ZS6JON, to establish and maintain the ISS connection.

The ARISS radio contact is scheduled for May 20, 2022 at 2:14 pm CEST (Cologne, DE) (12:14 UTC, 8:14 am EDT, 7:14 am CDT, 6:14 am MDT, 5:14 am PDT).

The public is invited to watch the live stream at: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=otZcANd1vXo
_______________________________

As time allows, students will ask these questions:

  1. Was war das Spannendste, was Sie bisher im Weltraum gesehen haben?
  2. Cosa hai provato durante la tua prima missione nello spazio?
  3. Quali esperimenti sono stati difficili da realizzare?
  4. In cosa consiste la tua missione sulla ISS?
  5. Woran forschen Sie?
  6. Quando nasce la tua passione per lo spazio?
  7. Qual’e’ la velocità di crescita di una pianta nello spazio?
  8. Che sensazione si prova ad essere sospesa nell’aria?
  9. Warum sind Sie Astronautin geworden?
  10. Se ci fosse un pianeta roccioso con caratteristiche simili alla Terra ma di maggiore massa, cambierebbe il tipo di allenamento per adattarsi a una maggiore gravita’?
  11. La tecnologia nello spazio funziona come sulla Terra?
  12. Was machen die Astronauten im Weltall?
  13. Wie träumt man? Träumt man überhaupt?
  14. Durante le tue missioni,quali sono stati i rischi o pericoli piu’ gravi che hai dovuto affrontare?
  15. Che cosa si deve fare quando ci si ammala nello spazio?
  16. Quanto tempo ci hai messo per diventare astronauta?
  17. Wie merkt man, ob es Tag oder Nacht ist? Wird man überhaupt müde?
  18. Qual’e’ la tua vista preferita dallo spazio?
  19. Quali sono le conseguenze sul corpo umano dopo un soggiorno prolungato nello spazio? Sono necessarie cure specifiche per ristabilire i valori fisici alterati?
  20. Ti piace stare nello spazio? Perche’?

Translation

  1. What’s the most exciting thing you’ve seen in space so far?
  2. How did you feel during your first space mission?
  3. Which experiments were difficult to complete?
  4. What is your mission on ISS about?
  5. What are you researching on ISS?
  6. When was your passion for space born?
  7. How fast do plants grow in space?
  8. What do you feel when you float in the air?
  9. Why did you become an astronaut?
  10. If a rocky planet with similar characteristics to Earth but a larger mass existed, how would your training change to adapt to a stronger gravity?
  11. Does technology in space work as on Earth?
  12. What are the astronauts doing in space?
  13. How do you dream in space? Do you dream at all?
  14. During your missions, what were the biggest risks or dangers you had to face?
  15. What do you need to do when you become ill in space?
  16. How long did it take you to become an astronaut?
  17. How do you tell if it’s day or night? Do you get tired at all?
  18. What is your favourite view from space?
  19. What are the consequences on the human body after a long stay in space? Do you need any specific treatments to re-establish normal physical values?
  20. Do you like to be in space?
    ________________________________

ARISS News Release                                                                               No. 22-28

ARISS Contact is Scheduled with Students at Scuola Secondaria di I Grado G. Leopardi, Macherio, Monza e Brianza, Lombardia, Italy

May 10, 2022—Amateur Radio on the International Space Station (ARISS) has received schedule confirmation for an ARISS radio contact between astronauts aboard the International Space Station (ISS) and students at the Secondary School of I Grade G. Leopardi, in Macherio, Monza and Brianza provence, Lombardy region, Italy.  ARISS conducts 60-80 of these special amateur radio contacts each year between students around the globe and crew members with ham radio licenses aboard the ISS.

The G. Leopardi secondary school is part of the Comprehensive Institute, called “G. Rodari “, which was established in the 2000/2001 school year and takes its name from the Primary school located in the Bareggia hamlet. Throughout the past year, the school involved about 240 middle and elementary grade students (ages 10-14 years) in preparation for this ARISS contact. Students were engaged in various STEM courses designed to enhance their knowledge of space exploration, technologies and satellite communications. Students learned about various aspects of space exploration in a wide range of courses in the fields of; literature, history, physical education, music, and cultural studies. The school also organized various lectures, seminars and conferences for the students and the public on topics presented by experts in the fields of: astrophysics, archaeology, space medicine, electrical engineering, environmental science, music, literature, and amateur radio.  Members of the Association of Amateur Radio Italy (ARI Erba) will be supporting the radio contact.

This will be a telebridge Contact via Amateur Radio allowing students to ask their questions of Astronaut Samantha Cristoforetti, amateur radio call sign IZØUDF. Local Covid-19 protocols are adhered to as applicable for each ARISS contact. The downlink frequency for this contact is 145.800 MHZ and may be heard by listeners that are within the ISS-footprint that also encompasses the telebridge station.

The ARISS amateur radio ground station (telebridge station) for this contact is in Greenbelt, Maryland, U.S. The amateur radio volunteer team at the ground station will use the callsign K6DUE, to establish and maintain the ISS connection.

The ARISS radio contact is scheduled for May 12, 2022 at 10:19 am CEST (Macherio), (8:19 UTC, 4:19 am EDT, 3:19 am CDT, 2:19 am MDT, 1:19 am PDT).

The public is invited to watch the live stream at: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=duoy5ArXFFw
________________

As time allows, students will ask these questions:

  1. Hai mai pensato di intraprendere una professione diversa da quella di astronauta?
  2. Per quali motivi consiglieresti i tuoi studi e la tua carriera a noi giovanissimi?
  3. I tuoi successi sono noti a tutti, ma anche tu avrai avuto momenti di sconforto. Come li hai superati e che consigli daresti ai ragazzi della mia eta’?
  4. Quale e’ la competenza piu’ utile nello spazio?
  5. Quanti anni di allenamento servono per andare nello spazio?
  6. Quale è il sacrificio piu’ grande che hai dovuto affrontare per arrivare dove sei ora?
  7. Come è cambiato il tuo rapporto con familiari e amici dall’inizio della tua carriera di astronauta?
  8. Quanto dura la riabilitazione dopo l’atterraggio?
  9. Le fiamme di accendini o fiammiferi puntano in alto come sulla Terra o in altre direzioni?
  10. E’ vero che nello spazio i sapori diventano insipidi?
  11. Che sensazione si prova a stare nello spazio?
  12. Perche’ nello spazio il corpo subisce un invecchiamento accelerato, ma reversibile, una volta tornati sulla Terra?
  13. Riuscite ad osservare i pianeti del Sistema Solare dalla ISS?
  14. E’ vero che sulla stazione spaziale si coltivano alcuni tipi di vegetali? Come fate?
  15. Tra gli esperimenti con conduci a bordo della ISS, quali avranno effetti significativi per la vita sulla Terra?
  16. Secondo te in futuro si potra’ vivere anche su altri pianeti?
  17. Quale e’ la temperatura all’interno dei moduli spaziali? E all’esterno?
  18. Quali ricerche state svolgendo con questa missione?
  19. Hi mai montato di persona attrezzature esterne alla stazione? Se si, quanto e’ stato difficile?
  20. Quale e’ il tuo incarico principale all’interno della missione Minerva?

Translation

  1. Have you ever thought about taking up a profession other than that of an astronaut?
  2. For what reasons would you recommend your studies and your career to us very young?
  3. Everyone knows your successes, but you too will have had moments of despair. How did you overcome them and what advice would you give to kids?
  4. What is the most useful skill in space?
  5. How many years of training does it take to go into space?
  6. What is the biggest sacrifice you have had to make to get to where you are now?
  7. How has your relationship with family and friends changed since the beginning of your astronaut career?
  8. How long does rehabilitation take after landing?
  9. Do the flames of lighters or matches point as high as on Earth or in other directions?
  10. Is it true that flavors become insipid in space?
  11. How does it feel to be in space?
  12. Why does the body in space undergo accelerated but reversible aging once back on Earth?
  13. Can you observe the planets of the Solar System from the ISS?
  14. Is it true that some types of vegetables are grown on the space station? How do you do it?
  15. Among the experiments with Conduci aboard the ISS, which ones will have significant effects for life on Earth?
  16. Do you think it will be possible to live on other planets in the future?
  17. What is the temperature inside the space modules? And outside?
  18. What research are you doing with this mission?
  19. Have you ever assembled equipment outside the station yourself? If so, how difficult was it?
  20. What is your main assignment within the Minerva mission?
    ____________________________________________

ARISS News Release                                                                               No. 22-27

ARISS Contact is Scheduled with Students at Istituto Comprensivo Tolfa, Tolfa, Lazio, Italy

April 27, 2022—Amateur Radio on the International Space Station (ARISS) has received schedule confirmation for an ARISS radio contact between astronauts aboard the International Space Station (ISS) and Italian students at the Istituto Comprensivo Tolfa in Tolfa, Lazio.  ARISS conducts 60-80 of these special amateur radio contacts each year between students around the globe and crew members with ham radio licenses aboard the ISS.

Istituto Comprensivo Tolfa, an urban primary and middle school (student ages 8-14 years) in Tolfa is about 70 Km north of Rome. The school’s three-year curriculum focuses on the improvement of language skills, both in Italian and in English, and on STEM competencies. During the last three years, students have taken part in the projects: ESA (“Send your drawing into space with Cheops”); ASI (sending mission ARTEMIS-inspired drawings to the Moon); and INAF (learning about the effects of light pollution). In preparation for the ARISS event, students participated in activities drawn from ASI – ESA and NASA materials and were introduced to space-related technology and space exploration. These activities allow students to focus on what it’s like to be an astronaut, and the high-tech fields involved in space exploration and the ISS. One such activity allowed primary school students (age 8-10) to work on ISS-inspired scratch projects and middle school students took part in the Astro Pi Challenge – Mission Zero. Members of the local amateur radio organization involved the students in activities about radio science and demonstrated operation of the radio equipment that will be used in the ARISS contact.

This will be a direct contact via Amateur Radio allowing students to ask their questions of Astronaut Samantha Cristoforetti, amateur radio call sign IZØUDF. Local Covid-19 protocols are adhered to as applicable for each ARISS contact. The downlink frequency for this contact is 145.800 MHZ and may be heard by listeners that are within the ISS-footprint that also encompasses the relay ground station.

The amateur radio ground station for this contact is in Tolfa, Lazio, Italy. Amateur radio operators will use the call sign IKØWGF to establish and maintain the ISS connection.

The ARISS radio contact is scheduled for April 30, 2022 at 10:37:35 am CEST (Lazio, Italy) (08:37:35UTC, 4:37 am EDT, 3:37 am CDT, 2:37 am MDT, 1:37 am PDT).

The public is invited to watch the live stream at: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JKlOwjvTpt8
______________________

As time allows, students will ask these questions:

  1. Da donna che tipo di difficoltà ha dovuto gestire durante il suo percorso professionale?
  2. Quando parte per queste missioni, cos’è che la preoccupa di più?
  3. Il buio, il vuoto e la profondità dell’universo, che sensazioni trasmettono la prima volta che si va in una missione spaziale?
  4. Durante le tue missioni quali sono l’esperienza più emozionante e quella più deludente che hai vissuto?
  5. Quali effetti fisici e mentali si riscontrano una volta ritornati sulla Terra?
  6. Gli astronauti fanno delle esercitazioni anche per riuscire a mantenere la calma in qualsiasi situazione?
  7. A cosa avete rinunciato negli anni per fare gli astronauti?
  8. Nello spazio come si percepisce il passare del tempo?
  9. La NASA è riuscita ad ascoltare “la voce dello spazio”: cosa si intende con questa definizione?
  10. A quale preparazione fisica dovete sottoporvi prima di una missione spaziale?
  11. Quanto è evidente dallo spazio la sofferenza del nostro pianeta?
  12. Cosa ha provato la prima volta che ha visto la Terra dallo spazio?
  13. E’stato portato qualche animale sulla nelle ultime missioni spaziali?
  14. Era il tuo sogno fin da bambina diventare un astronauta?
  15. L’equipaggio di una navicella spaziale da quanti membri è costituito?
  16. Che cos’è per te il coraggio?
  17. Il vostro addestramento in astronautica vi tornerà utile per la vita quotidiana ?
  18. Quale dieta seguite?

Translation

  1. When you go on a mission what are the things that worry you most?
  2. What did you feel the first time you witnessed the vastness of space, its darkness and emptiness?
  3. On your missions what has been the most meaningful experience and the most disappointing one?
  4. What are the physical and mental effects an astronaut can experience once back on Earth?
  5. Do astronauts do a specific training to keep calm in any situation?
  6. What did you have to give up to become an astronaut?
  7. How do you perceive the passing of time on the ISS?
  8. NASA could hear the “sound of Space”: what is it?
  9. What physical training is necessary before a mission?
  10. How evident is Earth’s suffering from space?
  11. What did you feel the first time you saw Earth from space?
  12. In recent years have any animals been sent on missions?
  13. Have you always dreamt of becoming an astronaut?
  14. How many people form the crew of a spaceship?
  15. What is courage for you?
  16. Is your astronaut training useful also in your daily life on Earth?
  17. Which is your astronaut diet?

ARISS News Release                                                                             No. 22-26

ARISS Contact is Scheduled with Students at Istituto Comprensivo 1 Chieti, Chieti, Abruzzo, Italy

April 27, 2022—Amateur Radio on the International Space Station (ARISS) has received schedule confirmation for an ARISS radio contact between astronauts aboard the International Space Station (ISS) and Italian students at the Istituto Comprensivo 1 Chieti in Chieti, Abruzzo.  ARISS conducts 60-80 of these special amateur radio contacts each year between students around the globe and crew members with ham radio licenses aboard the ISS.

Istituto Comprensivo Chieti is an urban school in Chieti with about 1,000 students ages 4-14 years. The school’s STEAM program includes lessons and projects for students at every grade level in the school. Previous school years have engaged students in robotics, and enabled students to participate in the INDIRE project (coding and robotics). Students have also participated in project ESA “Zero Mission- Astro Pi”, and in 2021 met with ESA Astronaut Luca Parmitano. Members of the amateur radio team from Pescara are supporting the school for this ARISS contact, including instructing students on the equipment required to make the contact and installation of the communication equipment.

This will be a direct contact via Amateur Radio allowing students to ask questions of Astronaut Samantha Cristoforetti, amateur radio call sign IZØUDF. Local Covid-19 protocols are adhered to as applicable for each ARISS contact. The downlink frequency for this contact is 145.800 MHZ and may be heard by listeners that are within the ISS-footprint that also encompasses the relay ground station.

The amateur radio ground station for this contact is located in Chieti, Abruzzo, Italy. Amateur radio operators will use the call sign IZ6BMP to establish and maintain the ISS connection.

The ARISS radio contact is scheduled for April 29, 2022 at 9:49 am CEST (Chieti) (07:49UTC, 3:49 am EDT, 2:49 am CDT, 1:49 am MDT, 12:49 am PDT).

The public is invited to watch the live stream at: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LlAR81pM4kM
_____________________________

As time allows, students will ask these questions:

  1. Come si é sentita quando é stato annunciato a lei di andare alla base spaziale?
  2. Quando torni dallo spazio, in cui non c’è gravità, alla terra che sensazioni hai?
  3. Che effetto ti fa vedere la terra girare?
  4. Che tipo di test hai dovuto superare per entrare nella NASA?
  5. Ti sei mai sentita sotto pressione?
  6. Chi o che cosa ti ha ispirato e dato la forza di perseguire la carriera di astronauta?
  7. Quali studi si devono fare per diventare un astronauta e in particolare tu quali hai fatto?
  8. Quanto tempo ha impiegato per entrare nella ESA?
  9. Quali competenze tecniche e informatiche sono necessarie e perché? Attraverso quali corsi di studio si acquisiscono?
  10. Quanto dura l’addestramento per andare nello spazio?
  11. E’ stato difficile abituarsi a muoversi con la mancanza di gravità nello spazio?
  12. Com’è possibile la trasmissione di dati dallo spazio alla terra in tempo reale?
  13. Qual’è il tempo massimo per rimanere sulla stazione spaziale?
  14. È mai stato sperimentato un metodo per vedere esattamente cosa c’è dentro la luna?
  15. Quanto impegno e sacrificio è necessario per diventare astronauti? Quale gioia si prova ad essere astronauti?

Translation

  1. How did you feel when you were told you would go to the space station?
  2. How do you feel when you come back on the Earth, when you come back to gravity?
  3. How do you feel when you see the Earth rotation?
  4. What kind of test did you have to pass to enter NASA?
  5. Have you ever felt under pressure?
  6. Who or what inspired you and gave you the strength to pursue your career as astronaut?
  7. What studies do you have to do to become an astronaut and in particular which ones have you done?
  8. How long did it take you to enter the ESA?
  9. Which technical and I.T. skills are needed and why? How can you get them?
  10. How long is the training to go to space?
  11. Was it hard to learn to move in lack of gravity in space?
  12. How can data be transmitted from space to Earth in real time?
  13. What is the maximum time to stay on a space station?
  14. Have people ever tested a way to see what’s inside the moon exactly?
  15. How much effort and sacrifice does it take to become an astronaut? What joy does it feel to be an astronaut?
    _______________________________

ARISS News Release                                                                                No. 22-25

ARISS Contact is Scheduled with Students at Bellefontaine High School, Bellefontaine, Ohio, USA

April 19, 2022—Amateur Radio on the International Space Station (ARISS) has received schedule confirmation for an ARISS radio contact between astronauts aboard the International Space Station (ISS) and U.S. students at the Bellefontaine High School in Bellefontaine, OH.  ARISS conducts 60-80 of these special amateur radio contacts each year between students around the globe and crew members with ham radio licenses aboard the ISS.

Bellefontaine High School (BHS), is a rural, public high school (about 900 students, ages 13-18 years) about 50 miles northwest of Columbus, Ohio, in Logan County. BHS’s STEM curriculum supports the school’s various academic extracurriculars and clubs which include Envirothon, TEAMS (Tests of Engineering Aptitude, Mathematics, and Science), Robotics and their newly formed Bellefontaine High School Amateur Radio Club, call sign W8BCS. Members of the local amateur radio club (W8BCS), the Champaign Logan Amateur Radio Club (CLARC), are providing technological aid and promoting amateur radio to the students as a co-sponsor for radio license classes and license testing. During the school year student activities have used the ARRL curriculum resources, which allow teachers to introduce space-related technology to the classroom. Students also participated in their ‘Design Challenges’ – a program that allows students the opportunity to design various “contraptions” to achieve a task under certain constraints (as would occur in aerospace engineering) to further their understanding of space technology.

This will be a direct contact via Amateur Radio allowing students to ask their questions of Astronaut Kayla Barron, amateur radio call sign KI5LAL. Local Covid-19 protocols are adhered to as applicable for each ARISS contact. The downlink frequency for this contact is 145.800 MHZ and may be heard by listeners that are within the ISS-footprint that also encompasses the relay ground station.

The amateur radio ground station for this contact is in Bellefontaine, OH. Amateur radio operators will use call sign W8BCS to establish and maintain the ISS connection.

The ARISS radio contact is scheduled for April 21, 2022 at 1:13 pm EDT (Bellefontaine, OH) (17:13UTC, 12:13 pm CDT, 11:13 am MDT, 10:13 am PDT).

The public is invited to watch the live stream at: https://youtu.be/6t5ZQOw2j68

_______________________________
As time allows, students will ask these questions:

  1. How long does it take to get used to gravity after being in space?
  2. Can you throw objects, like a football, on the ISS?
  3. How close are you to the moon, sun, or earth right now?
  4. How do you train to keep healthy in space?
  5. What is the weirdest thing you have ever encountered in space?
  6. How long can you stay in space?
  7. What is the protocol if depressurization occurs on the ISS?
  8. Who inspired you to go to space?
  9. What happens if someone breaks a bone or gets injured in another way on the ISS?
  10. Aside from a clock, how do you know if it is day or night in space?
  11. Do you have a tracking device in case an asteroid hits the ISS or another planet?
  12. What does the earth look like from the ISS?
  13. How does space affect our motor skills?
  14. What are some of the side effects of spending long durations in space?
  15. What is your favorite part of being in space?
  16. What resources do you have available on the ISS if something breaks?
  17. What is the hardest thing about going to space?
  18. How long and how hard did you have to train in order to be able to go to space?
    __________________________

ARISS News Release                                                                                 No. 22-24

ARISS Contact is Scheduled with Students at Rakia – Herzliya Science Center, Herzliya, Israel

April 11, 2022—Amateur Radio on the International Space Station (ARISS) has received schedule confirmation for an ARISS radio contact between Axiom Mission-1 (Ax-1) astronauts aboard the International Space Station (ISS) and Israeli students at the Rakia – Herzliya Science Center located in Herzliya, Israel.  Ax-1 is the first private astronaut mission to the International Space Station. ARISS conducts 60-80 of these special amateur radio contacts each year between students around the globe and crew members with ham radio licenses aboard the ISS.

The Rakia – Herzliya Science Center (HSC) is an educational institute that promotes STEM studies for students (about 1,500) in kindergarten to high-school (K-12). It has diverse enrichment programs, in a variety of scientific and technological fields including space, robotics, physics, computer sciences, and life sciences. One of the educational programs, a joint project with Herzliya Science Center and ARISS, gives 200 Israeli high-school students the opportunity to manage all ARISS contacts between the school’s students and Astronaut Eytan Stibbe. The ‘Tuval’ program in which the students attend, teaches radio transmissions and satellite operations. The students, with help from professional guides, will be operating the ground station for this contact and have spent the last few months preparing to take their place as part of the Rakia mission. In 2011, Herzliya Science Center successfully participated in a direct ARISS contact as callsign 4X4HSC with Astronaut, Mike Fossum KF5AQG. The Space Laboratory of HSC operates an amateur radio satellite station (call sign 4X4HSC) that is used as part of the HSC educational activities and for tracking of LEO satellites. The HSC amateur radio satellite station is supported by local radio amateurs of the Israel Amateur Radio Club (IARC).

This will be a direct contact via Amateur Radio allowing students to ask questions of Ax-1 Astronaut Eytan Stibbe, amateur radio call sign 4Z9SPC. Local Covid-19 protocols are adhered to as applicable for each ARISS contact. The downlink frequency for this contact is 145.800 MHZ and may be heard by listeners that are within the ISS-footprint of the Rakia-Herzliya ground station.

Amateur radio operators in Herzliya, Israel will use call sign 4X4HSC while operating the amateur radio ground station.

The ARISS radio contact is scheduled for April 14, 2022 at 4:32 pm IDT (Herzliya) (13:32UTC, 9:32 am EDT, 8:32 am CDT, 7:32 am MDT, 6:32 am PDT).

The public is invited to watch the live stream at: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC1gJRBkNXyv5tbMZkmjzi4g  (Rakia-Herzliya) or www.youtube.com/watch?v=YJ_Bvr_z-FQ (ARISS YouTube)
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As time allows, students will ask these questions:

  1. מה חשבת ואיך הרגשת כשראית את כדור הארץ מהחלל בפעם הראשונה? 
  2. האם אתה תומך במשימה של ספייס איקס למאדים? אם יכריזו על משימה למאדים האם תסכים להשתתף ולמה ?
  3. אתה חושב שיש חיים ביקום הזה חוץ מאיתנו? מהי צורתם והאם לדעתך נגלה אי פעם אם הם קיימים?
  4. איך זה מרגיש להיות באפס כבידה? האם סבלת ממחלה מסוימת או עייפות במהלך שהייתך בחלל? אם כן, איך אתה מסתדר? אתה מוטרד מזה שהשהות בחלל יכולה לפגוע בגוף?
  5. אנחנו אנו מודעים להשקעה העצומה של העולם בהקמת תחנות חלל ומאמצים מאוד גדולים. מה לדעתך התמורה והתרומה של זה לאנושות? האם זה שווה את זה?
  6. איך הזמן עובר עליך כשאתה נמצא בתחנת החלל הבינלאומית?
  7. מה האימון הכי קשה שעברת כדי להכין אותך לטיסה חלל?
  8. האם אתה חושב שצריך להפוך חלל למגמה בבתי ספר? (שיעורים שלומדים בהם להיות אסטרונאוטים)
  9. האם תמיד רצית להיות אסטרונאוט? איך היה התהליך של הפיכה לאחד?
  10. מה היית אומר לעצמך בגיל 15-16? האם דמיינת שתגיע לאן שהגעת?
  11. כיצד אתה רוצה או מצפה שהמשימה שלך תשפיע על החברה?
  12. האם אתה חושב שיום אחד יהיה אפשר להשתמש בתחנות כאלה כתחנות מעבר כדי להגיע למקומות אחרים ביקום, או כבית חלופי לכדור הארץ ?
  13. אתה חושב שיש לנו כבני אדם תפקיד ביקום הזה?
  14. אם היית יכול לקחת עוד אדם אחד (חיי או מת) את מי היית לוקח ולמה?
  15. האם לוקח זמן להתרגל לזה שאין לך יכולת לעשות פעולות בסיסיות?
  16. במה תתרום לך הטיסה הזו מבחינה אישית וחברתית?
  17. באילו מכשירים אתה מתאמן בתחנת החלל?
  18. מה מחשבות שעולות לך כשאתה מסתכל החוצה מהחלון ורואה את החלל? האם זה מפחיד? מעניין? דמיוני?
  19. אתה חושב שתיירות חלל תתפתח בשנים הבאות?

Translation

  1. What did you think and how did you feel when you first saw Earth from space?
  2. Do you support SpaceX’s mission to Mars? If they announce a mission to Mars, will you agree to participate and why would you be able to do it?
  3. Do you think there’s life in this universe besides us? What is their shape and do you think we will ever find out if they exist?
  4. How does it feel to be zero gravity? Did you suffer from a particular illness or fatigue while in space? If so, how are you doing? Are you concerned that being in space can damage the body?
  5. We are aware of the world’s huge investment in the construction of space stations and very great efforts. What do you think the reward and contribution of this to humanity is? Is it worth it?
  6. How time passes on you when you are on the International Space Station?
  7. What’s the hardest workout you’ve ever had to get you ready for space flight?
  8. Do you think space should be turned into a major subject (megama) in schools? (lessons learned to be astronauts)
  9. Have you always wanted to be an astronaut? How was the process of becoming one?
  10. What would you say to yourself when you were 15 or 16? Did you imagine you’d get where you are?
  11. How do you want or expect your mission to affect society?
  12. Do you think that one day such stations could be used as transit stations to reach other places in the universe, or as an alternative home to Earth?
  13. Do you think we as human beings have a role to play in this universe?
  14. If you could take one more person (alive or dead) who would you take and why?
  15. Does it take time to get used to not being able to do basic actions in space?
  16. What will this flight do to you personally and socially?
  17. What instruments do you train on at the space station?
  18. What thoughts do you have when you look out the window and see the space? Is it scary? Interesting? Imaginary?
  19. Do you think space tourism will evolve in the years to come?
    ________________

ARISS News Release                                                                                  No. 22-20

ARISS Contact is Scheduled with Students at École Secondaire St. Albert Catholic High School, St. Albert, Alberta, Canada

April 8, 2022—Amateur Radio on the International Space Station (ARISS) has received schedule confirmation for an ARISS radio contact between Axiom Mission-1 (Ax-1) astronauts aboard the International Space Station (ISS) and Canadian students at the École Secondaire St. Albert Catholic High School in St. Albert.  Ax-1 is the first private astronaut mission to the International Space Station. ARISS conducts 60-80 of these special amateur radio contacts each year between students around the globe and crew members with ham radio licenses aboard the ISS.

École Secondaire St. Albert Catholic High School (SACHS) is a medium-sized high school in St. Albert, Alberta that offers English and French Immersion and Advanced Placement programs. In preparation for this ARISS contact, SACHS embedded topics related to space exploration and technology in all grade-levels to increase interest and curiosity in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM). SACHS’s school-wide events included: observatory fieldtrips, a ‘Space Evening’ that showcased student projects developed around a space theme, and guest speakers on STEM careers. SACHS also partnered with other elementary and junior high schools in the district for a space-themed science fair.

This will be a telebridge contact via Amateur Radio allowing students to ask their questions of Ax-1 Astronaut Mark Pathy, amateur radio call sign KO4WFH. Local Covid-19 protocols are adhered to as applicable for each ARISS contact. The downlink frequency for this contact is 145.800 MHz and may be heard by listeners that are within the ISS-footprint that also encompasses the telebridge station.

The ARISS amateur radio ground station (telebridge station) for this contact is in Casale Monferrato, Italy. The amateur radio volunteer team at the station will use the callsign IK1SLD, to establish and maintain the ISS connection.

The ARISS radio contact is scheduled for April 11, 2022 at 9:50 am MDT (Alberta, CAN) (15:50:31UTC, 11:50 am EDT, 10:50 am CDT, 8:50 am PDT).

The public is invited to watch the live stream at: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCA55YJg_jvRtoEBPKK-p__A
______________________________
As time allows, students will ask these questions:

  1. How long did it take for you to adjust to being in space?
  2. What factors did you worry about when going into space, such as space radiation?
  3. How are laws enforced in space?
  4. Are you able to see space trash and debris fly by as you look out the ISS?
  5. What threat does a large solar flare pose to the operation of the space station and the safety of the astronauts? If this is a risk, how is it minimized?
  6. How did training in zero gravity compare with how it actually feels in zero gravity? Do you experience space sickness?
  7. Have you seen any significant Earth weather systems (Tornados, hurricanes, fires etc.) from the ISS? If so, how was that?
  8. How long will you be away from home since the start of your training until you return?
  9. How did the astronauts that were already on the ISS react when your ‘private team’ showed up?
  10. What was your family’s reaction to you accepting the mission to space?
  11. What kind of training did you need to complete in order to prepare for this mission?
  12. Is it difficult to fall asleep?
  13. Is the sensation of orbiting the same as a drop on a roller coaster?

_______________________________

ARISS News Release                                                                                  No. 22-19

ARISS Contact is Scheduled with Students at DLR School Lab TU Dresden, Dresden, Germany

April 9, 2022—Amateur Radio on the International Space Station (ARISS) has received schedule confirmation for an ARISS radio contact between astronauts aboard the International Space Station (ISS) and German students at the DLR School Lab TU Dresden in Dresden.  ARISS conducts 60-80 of these special amateur radio contacts each year between students around the globe and crew members with ham radio licenses aboard the ISS.

The DLR School Lab TU Dresden (TUD) is part of a network of school laboratories funded by the German Aerospace Center (DLR). This facility allows students to carry out research and experiments in an authentic laboratory environment, which are specifically related to ongoing projects of DLR and TUD in the fields of natural sciences and technology. TUD is hosting this ARISS contact for students (ages 12 to 18) who come from various secondary schools in the Dresden area. These students have been participating in various events and competitions as members of Argus Saxonia team under guidance of TUD. These events have included; the 2020/21 German CANSAT, German-Polish summer science camp “Völlig schwerelos” 2021, Calliope Earth Observation Space-Hack Competition (Team Saxonia Spacelab) 2021, Holiday science camp “Moon Camp Challenge” 2022 and amateur radio training courses (in coordination with ham club DLØTSD members). Members of DARC amateur radio club (DLØTSD) located at TUD and working in cooperation with TUD provide hands-on experiments and workshops for students in the satellite communication technologies field and help organize these ARISS events.

This will be a direct contact via Amateur Radio allowing students to ask their questions of Astronaut Matthias Maurer, amateur radio call sign KI5KFH. Local Covid-19 protocols are adhered to as applicable for each ARISS contact. The downlink frequency for this contact is 145.800 MHZ and may be heard by listeners that are within the ISS-footprint that also encompasses the relay ground station.

Amateur radio operators in Dresden, Germany will use call sign DLØTSD while operating the amateur radio ground station.

The ARISS radio contact is scheduled for April 11, 2022 at 4:14 pm CEST (Dresden) (14:14UTC, 10:14 am EDT, 9:14 am CDT, 8:14 am MDT, 7:14 am PDT).

The public is invited to watch the live stream at: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3LKjD2QlisM
__________________________

As time allows, students will ask these questions:

  1. Was hat Sie dazu bewogen Astronaut zu werden?
  2. Kommt man bei einem ISS-Tag mit dem Tag-Nacht-Rhythmus durcheinander?
  3. Wird einem von der Schwerelosigkeit manchmal schwindelig?
  4. Was ist das Ziel Deiner Mission im Weltraum?
  5. Bekommt man auf der ISS genauso schnell Hunger wie auf der Erde?
  6. Geht die Uhr im Weltall gleich?
  7. Wie haben Sie es geschafft, ausgewählt und als Astronaut ausgebildet zu werden?
  8. Schmecken die gleichen Nahrungsmittel anders auf der ISS als auf der Erde?
  9. Wie oft und auf welche Weise nimmst du Kontakt mit deinen Liebsten auf?
  10. Durften Sie persönliche Gegenstände mitnehmen und falls ja, was?
  11. Hat sich der Blickwinkel auf dein Zuhause die Erde in irgendeiner Weise verändert, seit du auf der ISS bist?
  12. Haben Sie sich freiwillig für den Außeneinsatz gemeldet oder wie werden die Aufgaben verteilt?
  13. Wie haben Sie sich gefühlt, als sie zum ersten Mal die Erde von oben angeschaut haben?
  14. Wie haben Sie letzten Monat Ihren Geburtstag auf der ISS gefeiert?
  15. Welche tägliche Aufgabe machen Sie am liebsten und welche nicht so gern?
  16. Was war Ihre größte Angst vor dem Start der Mission?
  17. Wie geht das mit dem Schlafen genau und können Sie gut schlafen?
  18. Wie genau sieht dein Weltraumtraining aus?
  19. Was macht ihr bei einem plötzlichen Druckabfall auf der ISS, z.B. durch ein Leck in der Außenverkleidung?
  20. Was haben Sie zum Zeitpunkt des Lift-Offs gedacht und gefühlt?

Translation

  1. What was the reason of becoming an astronaut?
  2. Does your day-night rhythm get confused due to the ISS schedule?
  3. Do you get dizzy sometimes due to zero gravity?
  4. What is the goal of your ISS mission “Cosmic Kiss”?
  5. Do you get hungry as fast as you do on earth?
  6. Does the time pass by as fast as on earth?
  7. How did you manage to be chosen by ESA for the astronaut’s training?
  8. Does food taste different in space?
  9. How do you stay in contact with your loved ones?
  10. Did you take any personal belongings on your journey?
  11. Did you change your perspective on your home Earth since you are on board of the ISS?
  12. Did you do the EVA voluntarily or who decides which astronaut is doing a specific task?
  13. How did you feel when you first looked at the earth from above?
  14. How did you celebrate your birthday last month?
  15. Which daily task do you like most and which least?
  16. What was your biggest fear before you started your ISS mission?
  17. How does sleeping on ISS works in detail and do you sleep well?
  18. How does your daily sports routine look like?
  19. What do you do in case of a sudden decrease of the interior pressure?
  20. What were your thoughts and feelings at the time of lift-off?
    ___________________________

ARISS News Release                                                                                   No. 22-18  

ARISS Contact is Scheduled with Students at Space Hardware Club, Huntsville, Alabama, USA

April 4, 2022—Amateur Radio on the International Space Station (ARISS) has received schedule confirmation for an ARISS radio contact between astronauts aboard the International Space Station (ISS) and U.S. students at the Space Hardware Club in Huntsville, Alabama. ARISS conducts 60-80 of these special amateur radio contacts each year between students around the globe and crew members with ham radio licenses aboard the ISS.

Space Hardware Club (SHC) is a student organization at the University of Alabama (UAH) in Huntsville. Within SHC, students at UAH get the chance to gain hands-on experience with designing, building, and flying numerous types of aerospace payloads. The club’s Outreach Program activities includes high- altitude ballooning, payload design, low powered ESTES rockets, and the launching of high-altitude model rockets. SHC will host this ARISS contact for the following rural/suburban public schools: Buckhorn Middle School, Mountain Gap Middle School, New Hope Elementary School, and Sparkman Middle School. SHC Outreach members have been helping about 800 students from these schools to learn more about rocketry, high-altitude ballooning, amateur radio technology, and the research being conducted on the ISS. Leading up to the ARISS radio contact, SHC outreach members helped the students with hands-on amateur radio activities such as circuit building and antenna construction.

This will be a direct contact via Amateur Radio allowing students to ask their questions of Astronaut Thomas Marshburn, amateur radio call sign KE5HOC. Local Covid-19 protocols are adhered to as applicable for each ARISS contact. The downlink frequency for this contact is 145.800 MHZ and may be heard by listeners that are within the ISS-footprint that also encompasses the relay ground station.

Amateur radio operators in Huntsville, Alabama using call sign K4UAH will operate the amateur radio ground station

The ARISS radio contact is scheduled for April 7, 2022 at 12:07 pm CDT (Huntsville, AL) (17:07:39 UTC, 1:07 pm EDT, 11:07 am MDT, 10:07 am PDT).

The public is invited to watch the live stream at: https://uah-uasystem.zoom.us/j/87179587580

_______________________________
As time allows, students will ask these questions:

  1. How hard was it to adjust your regular activities so you can survive with zero gravity?
  2. When you heard you were going to the ISS, were you terrified? Because I know I would be.
  3. What made you want to go to space? Who inspired you?
  4. Is it hard to communicate with astronauts from other countries?
  5. What do you think is the most interesting thing you do on the ISS?
  6. How well does life (plants, bacteria, fungi) grow in space compared to Earth?
  7. What do you believe is in the future of space exploration and is it promising or not?
  8. Is there a type of food you are just absolutely sick of eating because you’ve had it so much?
  9. What do you do for fun to pass the time when you aren’t doing experiments?
  10. When you go into space do you see everything like planets, asteroids or the Milky Way?
  11. What shocked you the most when you got to space?
  12. What is the hardest challenge you have faced while living in space?
  13. What was your training like before you got to space and your favorite/least favorite part?
  14. Do you hydrofarm? If not, could you start one?
  15. Do you enjoy it when people from other countries join the ISS?
  16. What belongings can you bring up to space with you?
    _____________________________

ARISS News Release                                                                                    No. 22-17

ARISS Contact is Scheduled with Students at Leonardo-Da-Vinci Campus Nauen, Nauen, Germany

April 4, 2022—Amateur Radio on the International Space Station (ARISS) has received schedule confirmation for an ARISS radio contact between astronauts aboard the International Space Station (ISS) and German students enrolled at the Leonardo-Da-Vinci Campus in Nauen, Germany. ARISS conducts 60-80 of these special amateur radio contacts each year between students around the globe and crew members with ham radio licenses aboard the ISS.

Leonardo-Da-Vinci Campus (Campus) offers students STEM courses in mathematics, computer science, and physics as well as astronomy classes. Students at the Campus that will be participating in this ARISS contact are in high school, ages 14-17 years. Forty students have been directly involved in question selection and in workshops, and 100 students have attended space-related science (ISS as a topic) lectures and other events. The Campus has partnered with the DLR School Lab of the German Aerospace Center in Neustrelitz (DLR School Lab) where students will be participating in the radio contact. Local amateur radio operators in the DLR School Lab are providing technical support in the way of workshops, and lectures and the radio equipment for this ARISS radio contact.

This will be a direct contact via Amateur Radio that will allow students to ask their questions of Astronaut Matthias Maurer, amateur radio call sign KI5KFH. Local Covid-19 protocols are adhered to as applicable for each ARISS contact. The downlink frequency for this contact is 145.800 MHZ and may be heard by listeners that are within the ISS-footprint that also encompasses the relay ground station.

Amateur radio operators in Neustrelitz, Germany will use call sign DC1RSN to serve as the amateur radio ground station.

The ARISS radio contact is scheduled for April 6, 2022 at 1:48 pm CEST (Nauen/ Neustrelitz, DE) (11:48UTC, 7:48 am EDT, 6:48 am CDT, 5:48 am MDT, 4:48 am PDT).

The public is invited to watch the live stream at: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xk3nn3CYKoM
____________________________________

As time allows, students will ask these questions:

  1. Wie wirkt sich die Schwerelosigkeit auf ihren Körper aus?
  2. Vermissen Sie etwas, wenn Sie nicht mehr auf der ISS sind?
  3. Was vermissen sie am meisten?
  4. Welches einfache Experiment auf der Erde wollten Sie schon immer einmal auf der ISS tun?
  5. Welches ist die wichtigste Voraussetzung um Astronaut zu werden?
  6. Wie ist das, wenn man die Raumstation zum ersten Mal betritt?
  7. Was war die größte Umstellung als Sie das erste Mal im Weltraum waren?
  8. Was machen Astronauten bei enormen medizinischen Notfällen?
  9. Wie oft sehen Sie Polarlichter?
  10. Wie schläft man im Weltall?
  11. Wie ist die Luft zum Atmen?
  12. Wie ist das Essen im Weltall?
  13. Was ist bisher das faszinierendste Ereignis, dass sie auf der ISS erlebt haben?
  14. Können Sie Kontakt zu Ihrer Familie aufnehmen?
  15. Was machen sie gegen Heimweh?
  16. Welche Gedanken hatten Sie bei dem Start mit der Dragon-Rakete?
  17. Wie treiben Sie Sport auf der ISS?
  18. Verspüren Sie nach sportlicher Aktivität im Orbit Muskelkater wie auf der Erde?
  19. Haben Sie einen Talisman mit auf die ISS genommen?
  20. Wie geht man auf Toilette?
  21. Züchten Sie ihr eigenes Gemüse auf der ISS?

Translation:

  1. What is the impact on your body done by zero gravity?
  2. Are you going to miss something when you leave the ISS?
  3. What are you missing the most?
  4. Which simple experiment done on earth did you always try on board the ISS?
  5. What is the most important requirement to become an astronaut?
  6. How was it when you enter the space station for the first time?
  7. What is the biggest adjustment for being the first time in space?
  8. What do astronaut do in case of a big medical emergency?
  9. How often do you see polar lights?
  10. How do you sleep in space?
  11. How is the air for breathing?
  12. How is the food on board of the ISS?
  13. What was the biggest incidence so far during your stay on the ISS?
  14. Is there a way for you to get into contact with your family?
  15. What do you do against homesickness?
  16. What went through your mind during your launch with the Dragon-rocket?
  17. How do you do sports in space?
  18. Do you feel any muscle pain after sport, similar to your experience on earth?
  19. Did you take a mascot with you?
  20. How do you go to toilet in space?
  21. Do you grow your own vegetable on board the ISS?
    ______________________

ARISS News Release                                                                             No. 22-15

ARISS Contact is Scheduled with Students at Toyonaka High School, Toyonaka, Japan

March 18, 2022—Amateur Radio on the International Space Station (ARISS) has received schedule confirmation for an ARISS radio contact between astronauts on-board the International Space Station (ISS) and Japanese students at the Toyonaka High School in Toyonaka, Japan.  ARISS conducts 60-80 of these special amateur radio contacts each year between students around the globe and crew members with ham radio licenses on-board the ISS.

Toyonaka High School, founded in 1921, is one of Osaka’s prefectural high schools, located in Toyonaka, Osaka.  The school is designated as one of the Global Leader’s High Schools, and also designated as one of the Super Science High Schools. Members (about 30 students) of the Toyonaka High School Science Club, as part of their science activities, hold scientific labs for elementary school children a few times a year.  This year’s science club activity involves 20 elementary school children that are participating in this ARISS contact.  Science club members helped the children think about questions to ask astronauts on board the ISS and translate the questions into English.  After the contact, Toyonaka High School students will also participate in space science activities with the elementary school students. The Kansai ARISS project team is assisting the school with this contact.

This will be a direct contact via Amateur Radio and students will take turns asking their questions of Astronaut Kayla Barron, amateur radio call sign KI5LAL. Local Covid-19 protocols are adhered to as applicable for each ARISS contact. The downlink frequency for this contact is 145.800 MHZ and may be heard by listeners that are within the ISS-footprint that also encompasses the ground station.

Amateur radio operators in Toyonaka, Japan will use call sign 8J3THS to serve as the amateur radio ground station.

The ARISS radio contact is scheduled for March 21, 2022 at 5:46 pm JST (JPN) (8:46:32 UTC, 4:46 am EDT, 3:46 am CDT, 2:46 am MDT, 1:46 am PDT).
____________________

As time allows, students will ask these questions:

  1. What is your favorite space food?
  2. How do you go to the bathroom in space?
  3. How do you take a bath in space?
  4. How are injuries and illness treated in space?
  5. Because of COVID-19, people all over the world have to wear masks. Do you wear a mask on the ISS, too?
  6. What kind of training do you do in space?
  7. What happens if you throw something on the ISS?
  8. Can you see lightning from the ISS?
  9. How can you see stars and constellations from space?
  10. What are the hardest things on the ISS?
  11. What are fun things to do on the ISS?
  12. What do you want to eat after coming back to the earth?
  13. What were you interested in when you were 11 years old?
  14. What made you want to become an astronaut?
  15. What kind of effort did you make to become an astronaut?
  16. What is your dream for the future as an astronaut?
  17. What do you do on the ISS?
  18. What is the biggest problem of weightlessness?
  19. Can you distinguish a heavy object and a light object in zero gravity?
  20. How can you get along with other crew members from different countries?
    ___________

ARISS News Release                                                                          No. 22-14

ARISS Contact is Scheduled with Youth Members of Kids Star Club Sayama, Sayama, Japan

March 15, 2022—Amateur Radio on the International Space Station (ARISS) has received schedule confirmation for an ARISS radio contact between astronauts on-board the International Space Station (ISS) and Japan youth members of the Kids Star Club Sayama in Sayama, Japan.  ARISS conducts 60-80 of these special amateur radio contacts each year between students around the globe and crew members with ham radio licenses on-board the ISS.

Prior to this ARISS event, the Kids Star Club has held an amateur radio licensing seminar for the youth members, as well as lessons about radio waves, electricity, and space. Those successfully licensed youth will participate in the Q&A portion of the ARISS event. English will be the language used for this contact.

This will be a direct contact via Amateur Radio allowing these youth to take turns asking their questions of Astronaut Mark Vande Hei, amateur radio call sign KG5GNP. Local Covid-19 protocols are adhered to as applicable for each ARISS contact. The downlink frequency for this contact is 145.800 MHZ and may be heard by listeners that are within the ISS-footprint that also encompasses the ground station.

Kids Star Club youth members in Sayama, Japan will use the amateur radio ground station with call sign 8J1KSC to contact the ISS for this ARISS contact.

The ARISS radio contact is scheduled for March 17, 2022 at 7:21:47 pm JST (JPN) (10:21:47 UTC, 6:21 am EDT, 5:21 am CDT, 4:21 am MDT, 3:21 am PDT).

_______________________________

As time allows, students will ask these questions:

  1. What is the most beautiful constellation that you can see from the ISS?
  2. What was your job before becoming an astronaut and how does it influence your job now?
  3. Did you see a lot of space debris from the ISS?
  4. What food do you like to eat while in space?
  5. What is the most unusual phenomenon that can be seen from space? What kind of phenomenon is it?
  6. How does a paper airplane “fly” in the space station?
  7. Can analog clocks work in space?
  8. Do you think humans can really live in space?
  9. How did you first feel when you got into space?
  10. What do you want to do first when you return to Earth?
  11. What do you enjoy the most in space?
  12. How do you brush your teeth in space?
  13. Which is easier, life with gravity or life without gravity?
  14. How is the view of the sun rise from the ISS?
  15. Is there any space food that can only be eaten in space?
  16. What’s the hardest thing you have ever done in space and how did you overcome that?
  17. How do you feel when you look at Earth from space?

______________________________

ARISS News Release                                                                            No.   22-12

ARISS Contact Scheduled for Students at Carter G. Woodson Middle School, Hopewell, VA, USA

February 25, 2022—Amateur Radio on the International Space Station (ARISS) has received schedule confirmation for an ARISS radio contact between astronauts on-board the International Space Station (ISS) and USA students at the Carter G. Woodson Middle School located in Hopewell, Virginia.  ARISS conducts 60-80 of these special amateur radio contacts each year between students around the globe and crew members with ham radio licenses on-board the ISS.

The Carter G. Woodson Middle School is a diverse, urban public school that serves about 1,000 students in grades sixth through eight (ages 10 to 14 years). The school is named for Carter G. Woodson, a son of former slaves, who was born in Buckingham County, Virginia in 1875.  He served as an educator in numerous capacities and, in 1912, became the second African American to earn a doctorate from Harvard University.  An advocate of black achievement, Woodson was the founder of the association for the Study of Negro Life and History and he is considered the father of Black History Month.  During the school year prior to this ARISS contact, students in sixth grade science have spent a large portion of the year discussing the interrelationships existing between Earth and other celestial bodies. The school’s STEM curriculum included courses in space exploration of the solar system, characteristics of each planet, the technology of space exploration, and potential careers involving the study and exploration of space. The school has partnered with members of the Richmond Amateur Radio Club who have provided instruction and hands-on (kit-building) activities about the inner workings of radios, radio technologies, electronics and amateur radio communications (including the communications systems used on the ISS). Students have also learned about types of communication of several artificial Earth-orbiting satellites.

This will be a telebridge contact via amateur radio and students will take turns asking their questions of Astronaut Thomas Marshburn, amateur radio call sign KE5HOC. Local Covid-19 protocols are adhered to as applicable for each ARISS contact. The downlink frequency for this contact is 145.800 MHZ and may be heard by listeners that are within the ISS-footprint that also encompasses the telebridge station.

Amateur radio operatorsin Greenbelt, Maryland, USA will use call sign K6DUE to serve as the ARISS relay amateur radio ground station (telebridge station).

The ARISS radio contact is scheduled for February 28, 2022 at 9:43 am EST (Virginia, USA), (14:43:53 UTC, 8:43 am CST, 7:43 am MST and 6:43 am PST).

The public is invited to watch the live stream at: https://youtu.be/KmFtTluF3aQ
______________________

As time allows, students will ask these questions:

  1. What made you want to live in space?
  2. How do you not run out of food and where does it come from?
  3. Have any animals ever been on board the ISS?
  4. How do you return to Earth?
  5. What meals do you eat in space?
  6. What is your helmet made of and how does it work?
  7. How many miles does the ISS travel in a day?
  8. What do you do when you are not performing experiments or working on equipment?
  9. When you return back to Earth, do you experience any side effects from being in space for 6 months?
  10. What scientific discoveries have you made on board the ISS?
  11. What have you learned while on board the ISS?
  12. What is a goal you have during your mission?
  13. What kind of weather do you experience on board?
  14. How do you get water?
  15. What equipment do you need for a spacewalk?
  16. What does the moon look like from the ISS?
  17. Do you have doctors on board to help when you get sick or injured?
  18. How long does it take to get used to sleeping on a wall?
  19. How did it feel traveling up to the ISS?
  20. How do you train to live in a low gravity environment?
    _______________

  

ARISS News Release                                                                            No.   22-11

ARISS Contact is Scheduled for Students at Sussex County Charter School for Technology, Sparta, NJ, USA

February 21, 2022—Amateur Radio on the International Space Station (ARISS) has received schedule confirmation for an ARISS radio contact with astronauts. ARISS is the group that puts together special amateur radio contacts between students around the globe and crew members with ham radio licenses on the International Space Station (ISS).

This will be a direct contact via amateur radio between students at the Sussex County Charter School for Technology, Sparta, New Jersey and Astronaut Mark Vande Hei, amateur radio call sign KG5GNP. Students will take turns asking their questions. Local Covid-19 protocols are adhered to as applicable for each ARISS contact. The downlink frequency for this contact is 145.800 MHZ and may be heard by listeners that are within the ISS-footprint that also encompasses the radio relay ground station.

Amateur radio operators, using the call sign KD2YAQ, will operate the ham radio ground station for this contact.

The ARISS radio contact is scheduled for February 23, 2022 at 10:31 am EST (New Jersey), (15:31 UTC, 9:31 am CST, 8:31 am MST and 7:31 am PST).

Sussex Charter School for Technology (SCCST) is a STEM-focused, rural middle school in Sparta, NJ, serving 225 students. In preparation for this ARISS contact, through hands-on activities and class instruction, students worked with the local HAM radio club, high school, and university Physics departments to learn more about radio communications and solar influence on such communications. Members of the Sussex County Amateur Radio Club are supplying the direct contact equipment and will be conducting the ISS radio contact. New Jersey Institute of Technology (NJIT) has partnered with the school to introduce modules on space weather, solar cycles and ionospheric phenomena into their curriculum. Faculty members of NJIT’s amateur radio club, K2MFF, are founding members of HamSCI, and will lead the NJIT-SCCST collaboration and assist in the ARISS event and follow-up activities. Sussex County Technical School is their neighboring vocational/technical high school, and will provide filming and streaming capabilities.

The public is invited to watch the live stream at: https://youtu.be/dQpyK-uyzPU

_____________________________
As time allows, students will ask these questions:

  1. Do you have any telescopes on the ISS and, if so, how far can they see?
  2. In the event of space debris, asteroids, or solar flares collisions, what are the safety protocols or systems to ensure the astronaut’s/cosmonaut’s safety in situations like that?
  3. How do you exercise on the space station if there’s no gravity?
  4. What science experiments are you working on that will have an impact on the future?
  5. How do you feel about private space companies trying to make space travel open to civilians?
  6. What is the best space food you’ve eaten, and do you notice any improvement in the quality of the food since the Deep Space food challenge started?
  7. How often do you need to communicate with the Earth (Mission control)?
  8. What would you do if the communication with Mission Control broke down and you couldn’t communicate with Earth?
  9. Being that you see 16 sunrises and sunsets in each day, how do you regulate your sleep schedule?
  10. What steps are taken on the ISS to shield you from the pathway of the Sun’s radiation?
  11. How do astronauts control the robotic arm on the outside of the space station? Do you use a computer program or use a joystick like on a game controller?
  12. Who put the first pieces of the International Space Station together and will any of it be reused after the mission ends?
  13. How do astronauts maintain good hygiene on the ISS if there are no showers?
  14. What happens if an astronaut gets a serious virus or other illness while they are on the ISS?
  15. What is your least favorite chore or dangerous task that you do in space?
  16. What are the legal parameters followed in regards to the fly zones? If something should go wrong, while over a country other than the U.S., what fly zone rules are followed for legal purposes?
  17. How did your parents react when you arrived at the space station or when you left them?
  18. Considering the limited amount of your own items you can bring along with you from Earth, can you share with us one of the items you brought?
  19. What are the negative physical impacts on your body of being in space and does it go back to normal when you’re back on Earth?
  20. Would you let your own young kids, nieces, or nephews go to space if young people were given an opportunity to do so?
  21. If you could change one thing about space travel what would that be?
    ______________

  

ARISS News Release                                                                                 No.   22-10 

ARISS Contact is Scheduled for Students from two schools in Germany: Erasmus-Gymnasium Denzlingen, Denzlingen and Goethe-Gymnasium, Freiburg

February 20, 2022—Amateur Radio on the International Space Station (ARISS) has received schedule confirmation for an ARISS radio contact with astronauts. ARISS is the group that puts together special amateur radio contacts between students around the globe and crew members with ham radio licenses on the International Space Station (ISS).

This will be a direct contact via amateur radio between students at two schools in Germany and Astronaut Matthias Maurer, amateur radio call sign KI5KFH. Students will take turns asking their questions. Local Covid-19 protocols are adhered to as applicable for each ARISS contact. The downlink frequency for this contact is 145.800 MHZ and may be heard by listeners that are within the ISS-footprint that also encompasses the radio relay ground station.

Amateur radio operators, using the call sign DN1EME, will operate the ham radio ground station for this contact.

The ARISS radio contact is scheduled for February 22, 2022 at 11:05 am CET (DE), (10:05 UTC, 5:05 am EST, 4:05 am CST, 3:05 am MST and 2:05 am PST).

Two schools, Erasmus-Gymnasium Denzlingen and Goethe-Gymnasium are jointly conducting this ARISS contact. The contact will be carried out directly from the premises of the Erasmus-Gymnasium in Denzlingen where students will be participating. Erasmus-Gymnasium Denzlingen is a public secondary school from 5th to 12th grade (about 500 students ages 10 – 18). Students in the 10th grade who have taken the elective specialty lessons in applied science and technology will be involved in this ARISS project (about 50 students). These students have prepared for this ARISS contact by taking a special unit of study – the History of Astronautics. 

Goethe-Gymnasium (in Freiburg) is a typical inner city high school with approximately 650 students from, in, and beyond Freiburg. The students in their 12th grade class that are participating in the ARISS contact are also enrolled in physics courses: electromagnetic waves, mathematical tools and technical applications.

The contact will be supported by experienced amateur radio operators and members of multiple local amateur radio clubs (all part of Deutscher Amateur Radio Club DARC) who have supported the preparation of this contact by lecturing to the students and providing technical equipment. They have also provided several workshops and hands-on training sessions with the students.

The public is invited to watch the live stream at: www.dd1us.de/ARISS.html and https://live.on.radio/dn1eme

_____________________________
As time allows, students will ask these questions:

  1. Welche Gesetze gelten auf der ISS?
  2. Gibt es Feste?Gibt es Streit?Wie ist der soziale Alltag auf der ISS?
  3. Glauben Sie, dass es außerirdische Lebensformen im Weltall gibt?
  4. Was war für Sie das beängstigendste Erlebnis auf der ISS?
  5. Was sagen Sie zu Menschen, die glauben, dass die Erde eine Scheibe ist?
  6. Wie würde es sich anfühlen, wenn die ISS plötzlich Luft verlieren würde, und wie schnell könnten Sie bei einem Notfall zur Erde zurückkehren?
  7. Verliert man auf der ISS das Tag-Nacht-Gefühl?
  8. Wie lange brauchen sie, um sich einmal durch die ganze ISS zu bewegen?
  9. Was würde passieren, wenn jemand auf der ISS versterben würde?
  10. Was machen Sie, wenn die Toilette defekt ist?
  11. Wie hält man sich mental gesund?
  12. Sind von der ISS aus Folgen des Klimawandel zu sehen und forschen Sie auf der ISS am Thema Klimawandel?
  13. Was ist Ihre Meinung zum Thema „Weltraumtourismus“?
  14. Fühlt sich Schlafen anders an als auf der Erde und haben sich Ihre Träume im Weltall verändert?
  15. Wie hat sich Ihr Körper im Weltall bisher verändert?
  16. Wie viel Freizeit haben Sie und wie nutzen Sie diese?
  17. Hat sich Ihre Weltanschauung durch Ihren Beruf verändert?
  18. Was war die größte Umstellung für Sie, nachdem Sie auf der ISS angekommen waren?
  19. Hatte Covid19 Auswirkungen auf Sie und Ihren Raumflug?
  20. Welche Arbeiten werden bei einem Außeneinsatz verrichtet?
  21. Wie kamen Sie auf die Idee, Astronaut zu werden?
  22. Wie schneiden Sie sich auf der ISS die Haare?
  23. Wie ist das Essen auf der ISS?
  24. Was halten Sie von Marsflügen?

Translation:

  1. Which laws apply on board the ISS?
  2. Are there parties? Are there arguments? What is the daily social life like on the ISS?
  3. Do you believe that there are alien life forms in space?
  4. What has been the most terrifying experience you made on the ISS?
  5. What do you tell people who believe in a flat earth?
  6. What would a sudden loss of air on the ISS feel like and how long would it take you to return to earth in case of an emergency?
  7. Does one loose the feeling for day and night on the ISS?
  8. How long does it take you to travel through all of the ISS?
  9. What would happen if someone died on the ISS?
  10. What do you do if the lavatory is broken?
  11. How does one stay mentally sane?
  12. Are effects of climate change visible from the ISS and do you do research on the subject of climate change?
  13. What is your opinion on space tourism?
  14. Does sleeping feel different than on earth and how have your dreams changed in space?
  15. How has your body changed in space?
  16. How much spare time do you have and how do you spend it?
  17. Has your worldview changed because of your job?
  18. What was the hardest adjustment for you when you arrived on the ISS?
  19. Did Covid19 affect you and your mission?
  20. Which tasks are done during an EVA?
  21. How did you come up with the idea of becoming an astronaut?
  22. How do you cut hair on the ISS
  23. What is the food like on the ISS?
  24. What do you think about manned missions to Mars?
    ______________

ARISS News Release                                                                                 No.   22-07 

ARISS Contact is Scheduled for Students at FH Aachen, University of Applied Sciences, Aachen, Germany

February 12, 2022—Amateur Radio on the International Space Station (ARISS) has received schedule confirmation for an ARISS radio contact with astronauts. ARISS is the group that puts together special amateur radio contacts between students around the globe and crew members with ham radio licenses on the International Space Station (ISS).

This will be a direct contact via amateur radio between students at the FH Aachen University, Aachen, Germany, and Astronaut Matthias Maurer, amateur radio call sign KI5KFH. Students will take turns asking their questions. Local Covid-19 protocols are adhered to as applicable for each ARISS contact. The downlink frequency for this contact is 145.800 MHZ and may be heard by listeners that are within the ISS-footprint that also encompasses the radio relay ground station.

Amateur radio operators, using the call sign DLØFHA, will operate the ham radio ground station for this contact.

The ARISS radio contact is scheduled for February 14, 2022 at 12:40 pm CET (Aachen, DE), (11:40 UTC, 6:40 am EST, 5:40 am CST, 4:40 am MST and 3:40 am PST).

FH Aachen, University of Applied Sciences (FHAUAS), offer a bachelor’s and master’s education in STEM subjects that include: aerospace engineering, civil engineering, electrical engineering, power engineering, bioengineering, and computer engineering. Their aerospace engineering program focus on areas of study that include: aircraft engineering, aircraft operations engineering, propulsion engineering, and astronautical engineering.

FHAUAS’s Space Operations Facility is a permanent institution that teaches students the fundamentals of satellite operations by operating an amateur-radio-based spaceflight operations facility. This facility offers students the opportunity to gain insight into various aspects of a ground station and mission control center with most of the equipment built and programmed by students. Students at the Space Operations Facility also perform mission operations for other radio satellite missions such as capturing/decoding satellite data of weather satellites, CubeSats and amateur radio satellites. This ARISS contact is a project that has been organized by students in the Space Operations Facility. For this ARISS event, FHAUAS has partnered with the Yuri´s Night Deutschland e.V., Deutscher Amateur-Radio-Club e.V. (DARC), and Deutsches Zentrum für Luft- und Raumfahrt (DLR).

The public is invited to watch the live stream at: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mngrV2DzZAQ
________________________

As time allows, students will ask these questions:

For translations of these questions in German, please contact Rita DeHart, Director of Public Engagement at rmdehart@ariss-usa.org.

  1. Do you have to prick yourself during the physical experiments or do your colleagues do it?
  2. How did it feel when the rocket was launched?
  3. How did you feel the first time on the ISS in microgravity?
  4. How did you feel the first time when you slept on the ISS?
  5. On which former space mission would you have liked to work?
  6. What three things do you miss most aboard the ISS?
  7. Is there something special for Christmas or some kind of flat share evening with the crew?
  8. What is the most difficult activity you have performed in microgravity?
  9. How do you keep track of time on the ISS when you see a sunrise 16 times a day?
  10. In what way does CIMON ease your work on the ISS?
  11. What is the background noise on the ISS, in the space capsule and during a spacewalk?
  12. What tips can you give to a person who wants to become an astronaut?
  13. How did the post-nomination come up in 2015 and how did you feel about it?
  14. Are Thomas Pesquet’s slime mold blobs still on the ISS and if so, who is taking care of them?
  15. What has been the biggest challenge in space so far?
  16. If you had a choice, which planet would you most like to fly to?
  17. Is the food on the ISS as delicious as on Earth?
  18. Is there a special moment that happened to you in space?
  19. What training session helped you the most regarding life on the ISS?
  20. What are you most looking forward to on the ISS?
    _______________________

ARISS News Release                                                                                  No.   22-06

ARISS Contact is Scheduled for Students at Gewerbliche Schulen Donaueschingen, Donaueschingen, Germany

February 7, 2022—Amateur Radio on the International Space Station (ARISS) has received schedule confirmation for an ARISS radio contact with astronauts. ARISS is the group that puts together special amateur radio contacts between students around the globe and crew members with ham radio licenses on the International Space Station (ISS).

This will be a direct contact via amateur radio between students at the Gewerbliche Schulen Donaueschingen, in Donaueschingen, Germany and Astronaut Matthias Maurer, amateur radio call sign KI5KFH. Students will take turns asking their questions. Local Covid-19 protocols are adhered to as applicable for each ARISS contact. The downlink frequency for this contact is 145.800 MHZ and may be heard by listeners that are within the ISS-footprint that also encompasses the radio relay ground station.

Amateur radio operators, using the DN2FIS call sign, will operate the ham radio ground station for this contact.

The ARISS radio contact is scheduled for February 10, 2022, at 11:00:59 am CET (Donaueschingen, DE), (10:00:59 UTC, 5:00 am EST, 4:00 am CST, 3:00 am MST and 2:00 am PST).

Gewerbliche Schulen Donaueschingen provides a two-year vocational training program (about 1,200 students) in science and technology and also a Secondary school curriculum in the natural sciences and technology.  In addition to the broad general education common to all vocational high schools, students receive an introduction to working in the engineering sciences of mechanical and electrical engineering. The school focuses on courses in physics, mathematics, and electrical engineering. Students may also continue into their Technical College for mechanical engineering to become a technician in technical specialists’ fields of employment. The graduating 12th-grade class took on the ARISS contact as their final graduating project and have received support from local amateur radio club (DARC A18) members, and school staff. Many of the students involved in this project are licensed hams and members of the DARC A18. In preparation for the ARISS contact, students in the 12th-grade curriculum studied specific topics in physics (motion of bodies in space), mathematics, radio wave properties (Doppler effect), and electrical engineering of radio components (frequency filtering and modulation). Amateur radio club activities also engaged students in antenna construction projects.   

The public is invited to watch the live stream at: https://www.kmz-sbk.de/livestream/
____________________________

As time allows, students will ask these questions:

For translations of these questions in German, please contact Rita DeHart, Director of Public Engagement at rmdehart@ariss-usa.org

  1. How far do you think humanity has gone into space in 100 years?
  2. What is your opinion of the Fermi-Paradoxon? Do you think that extraterrestrial life exists, if so, where?
  3. Can you see the other planets better from the ISS than from Earth? Do you have a better view from there in general?
  4. What actions will be taken if there is a rupture or leak in one of the space capsules? How is the safety of the astronauts and crew ensured?
  5. Could you please bring us a small souvenir of you or the ISS? For example, a photo or something small that we can hang or display at school.
  6. Have you been able to try out your special oven and enjoy cookies?
  7. Was it always your dream to become an astronaut? What drove you to do it?
  8. You are permanently exposed to electronic devices that you operate. What opportunities do you have to relax, or how do you switch off?
  9. Do you also organize certain festivities up there, if this is possible? Did you have a nice Christmas?
  10. Do you know the idea of the so called “skyhook” and if you know it what do you think about it?
  11. Now that the construction of the Chinese space station is up, would orbital mechanics allow to recreate the stunt from the movie Gravity? As an emergency option to get out.
  12. What qualifications (medical knowledge) do you need to have as an astronaut? Did you find the training difficult?
  13. In the event of an emergency, how quickly can you exit the ISS if necessary? What procedure do you follow?
  14. If the safety line or the connection to the robot arm suddenly breaks during an outside walk, how can it be ensured that the astronaut does not disappear into space?
  15. Have you ever been afraid that you would never return to Earth?
  16. What solutions do you see to the problem of space debris?
  17. What training program do you perform after returning to earth to counteract muscle atrophy
  18. How long will it take you to get used to earthly conditions again?

______________________

ARISS News Release                                                                                   No.   22-05 

ARISS Contact is Scheduled for Students at Johannes-Kepler-Gymnasium, Lebach, Germany

February 2, 2022—Amateur Radio on the International Space Station (ARISS) has received schedule confirmation for an ARISS radio contact with astronauts. ARISS is the group that puts together special amateur radio contacts between students around the globe and crew members with ham radio licenses on the International Space Station (ISS).

This will be a direct contact via amateur radio between students at the Johannes-Kepler-Gymnasium, Lebach, Germany and Astronaut Matthias Maurer, amateur radio call sign KI5KFH. Students will take turns asking their questions. Local Covid-19 protocols are adhered to as applicable for each ARISS contact. The downlink frequency for this contact is 145.800 MHZ and may be heard by listeners that are within the ISS-footprint that also encompasses the radio relay ground station.

Amateur radio operators, using the call sign DL0JKG, will operate the ham radio ground station for this contact.

The ARISS radio contact is scheduled for February 4, 2022 at 12:37 pm CET (Lebach, Germany), (11:37 UTC, 6:37 am EST, 5:37 am CST, 4:37 am MST and 3:37 am PST).

Das JKG ist nun seit fast 10-Jahren im Saarland Vorreiterschule in Sachen Informatik, IT und Digitalisierung. Neben der Zusammenarbeit mit Partnern wie dem Globalplayer „Bosch GmbH Homburg“, dem „Umweltcampus Birkenfeld“ und dem lokalen Vertreter „Krämer-IT“ konnte die Lebacher MINT-Hochburg in diversen Projekten wie der Mitarbeit bei der Entwicklung der mittlerweile bundesweit verwendeten Bildungscloud oder dem Projekt IT2School über die Landesgrenzen hinaus Anerkennung erwerben.

Nachdem das Johannes-Kepler-Gymnasium 2018 zum ersten Mal als Mintfreundliche Schule Digital+ ausgezeichnet wurde, konnte sich die Schulgemeinschaft jüngst über die für Insider wenig überraschende Rezertifizierung freuen.

Nebenbei wird diese Expertise abgerundet, durch die Tatsache, dass die Schule eines von 3 Gymnasien mit einem eigenen MINT-Zweig, also mit Informatik als eigenständigem Unterrichtsfach ab Klassenstufe 8 sowie Leistungs- und Grundkursen in der gymnasialen Oberstufe und im Abitur ist.

Als logische Folgerung kann man in Lebach auch in Sachen IT-Infrastruktur stolz auf das erreichte sein. Die Schule verfügt zudem seit über 15 Jahren über eine Amateurfunkstation (DL0JKG) und führt regelmäßig MINT-Forschungsprojekte wie Stratosphärenballonstarts oder Raketenprojekte durch.

Daher freuen wir uns außerordentlich, mit unserem Landsmann Matthias Mauer live während des Überfluges des ISS sprechen zu dürfen, um so unsere Schüler für den MINT-Bereich motivieren zu können und ein unvergessliches Ereignis bei den Lernenden zu hinterlassen, von dem sie noch lange schwärmen dürften.

Translation

The Johannes Kepler (JKG) high school is one of only three high schools, in the Lebach area, with a STEM department and also provides IT and digital technologies programs. JKG partners with the global

player Bosch GmbH Homburg, Environmental Campus Birkenfeld (EBC), as well as local firms like Krämer-IT. JKG teaches IT as an independent subject starting from grade 8 through the students’ a-level exams in advanced and honors courses. Student activities include amateur radio, operating the school’s amateur radio station (DL0JKG), and launching high-altitude balloons and model rockets.

The public is invited to watch the live stream at: https://youtu.be/S15MUGSvlQI
________________________________

As time allows, students will ask these questions:

  1. Zunächst die wichtigste Frage an den ersten Saarländer im All: „Unn?“
  2. Sieht man die Saarschleife oder den Bostalsee aus dem Weltall?
  3. Gibt es Lyoner auf der ISS und was gibt es sonst noch zu essen?
  4. Spürst du Ehrfurcht, wenn du in die Weiten des Weltalls statt zurück zur Erde blickt?
  5. Was würdest du tun, wenn es gravierende Probleme mit deinem Raumschiff gibt, zum Beispiel durch Weltraumschrott oder Mikroasteroiden?
  6. Was machst du, wenn du ernsthaft krank wirst, zum Beispiel bei einem Herzinfarkt oder einer Blinddarmentzündung?
  7. Sind die Auswirkungen des Klimawandels vom Weltall aus zu erkennen?
  8. Gibt es Projekte auf der ISS, die das Klima und den Klimawandel erforschen?
  9. Hälst du es für realistisch, dass Bedingungen für menschliches Leben auf einem anderen Planeten geschaffen werden können, bevor unser Planet durch den Klimawandel für uns unbewohnbar wird?
  10. Kann man aus dem All das Wolkenband der Innertropischen Konvergenzzone und dessen Verlagerung im Laufe eines Jahres erkennen?
  11. Ändert der Aufenthalt auf der ISS den Glauben?
  12. Wie war der Flug zur ISS und wie ist es im Weltraum?
  13. Gibt es etwas, das du unbedingt in der Schwerelosigkeit machen wolltest, zum Beispiel einen Film schauen?
  14. Wen oder was vermisst neben Familie und Freunden?
  15. Wie hält du dich fit in der Schwerelosigkeit?
  16. Habt ihr W-Lan da oben und hast du dein Smartphone mitgenommen?
  17. Kannst du von deinen zwei Lieblingsprojekten auf der ISS berichten.
  18. Wie lange dauert die Ausbildung zum Astronauten und was war dein Lieblingsfach in der Schule?
  19. Willst du auch zum Mond fliegen?
  20. Sieht man von der ISS aus Naturkatastrophen auf der Erde, z.B. Ahrtal?

Translation

  1. First of all, a most important question for the first Saarlander* in space: “Unn?“
  2. Can you see the Saarschleife or the Bostalsee from space?
  3. Do you have ring bologna on the ISS and what else do you get to eat?
  4. Are you in awe when you look into the black of space instead of back to Earth?
  5. What would you do in case of an emergency on board, i.e., dangerous space debris or micro-meteorites.
  6. What do you do when someone gets seriously ill, like having a heart attack or having appendicitis?
  7. Can you see the effects of climate change from space?
  8. Are there projects on the ISS that research climate change?
  9. Do you think it is realistic that mankind will make it to another planet before climate change renders Earth uninhabitable?
  10. Can you see the clouds of the Intertropical Convergence Zone and its movement across a year?
  11. Did your stay on the ISS change your beliefs?
  12. How was your flight to space and what’s it like being on the ISS?
  13. Is there something you really wanted to experience in weightlessness, like watching a special movie?
  14. Beside friends and family, who or what do you miss the most?
  15. How do you stay healthy in space?
  16. Do you have Wi-Fi on board, and did you take your smartphone with you?
  17. Can you tell us about your two favorite projects on board?
  18. How long do you have to train to become an Astronaut and what was your favorite subject at school?
  19. Do you also want to fly to the Moon?
  20. Can you see natural catastrophes from space, like the flooding in West Germany last year?
    _________________________

* Saarland is a state in Germany on the western border.

ARISS News Release                                                                                    No. 22-04

ARISS Contact is Scheduled with Students at Lewis Center for Educational Research, Apple Valley, California, U.S.A.

January 28, 2022—Amateur Radio on the International Space Station (ARISS) has received schedule confirmation for an ARISS radio contact with astronauts. ARISS is the group that puts together special amateur radio contacts between students around the globe and crew members with ham radio licenses on the International Space Station (ISS).

This will be a Multipoint Telebridge Contact via Amateur Radio between the ISS and students from Lewis Center for Educational Research. Students will take turns asking their questions of ISS Astronaut Thomas Marshburn, amateur radio call sign KE5HOC, during the ARISS radio contact. The downlink frequency for this contact is 145.800 MHZ and may be heard by listeners that are within the ISS-footprint that also encompasses the ARISS radio telebridge station.

Amateur Radio Operators in Silver Spring, MD will use call sign K6DUE to serve as the ARISS relay amateur radio ground station. Local Covid-19 protocols are adhered to as applicable for each ARISS contact.

The ARISS radio contact is scheduled for January 31, 2022, at 9:47 am PST (Apple Valley, CA) (17:47UTC, 12:47 pm EST, 11:47 am CST, 10:47 am MST).

The Lewis Center for Educational Research operates two STEM-focused charter schools: Academy for Academic Excellence (AAE) in Apple Valley, California, and Norton Science and Language Academy (NSLA) in San Bernardino California. AAE is a Transitional kindergarten (TK) through12th grade that also offers students participation in Air Force Junior ROTC (One of the first 10 ROTC units chosen to convert to Space Force Junior ROTC). NSLA offers Dual Immersion (English/Spanish) programs for TK-9th grade and opened a new TK-12 campus that features a World Language and STEM-focused high school.

The Lewis Center also operates the Goldstone Apple Valley Radio Telescope (GAVRT) Radio Astronomy Program through a 25-year partnership with NASA/JPL. GAVRT students locally, nationally and globally have contributed to a number of NASA missions, including the LCROSS Mission to the moon and the Cassini Mission to Saturn. Through their Jupiter Quest campaign, NASA/JPL scientists have used GAVRT data taken of Jupiter to refine synchrotron radiation models which aided in the planning of the Juno mission orbiting Jupiter. GAVRT students are currently collecting valuable data on the Sun, Jupiter, Black Holes, and SETI.

The Lewis Center extends the classroom to the community and beyond with local science and social studies programs, which align with the State of California Common Core and Next Generation Science standards. Programs are offered in Astronomy, Aviation/Aeronautics, Beginning Engineering, California Gold Rush, and Trails West. A foundational partnership exists with Apple Valley Unified School District through the collaboration at Apple Valley Center for Innovation (AVCI), an informal education STEM center. In addition to hosting field trips, STEM nights and teacher trainings, AVCI also is home to the Luz Observatory which is operated by the Lewis Center’s High Desert Astronomical Society and open to the public.

Local amateur radio operators also provided the students with ham radio demonstrations and classroom presentations/activities prior to the ARISS contact.

View the live stream of the upcoming ARISS radio contact on facebook live at: https://www.facebook.com/events/7430066970340476/ and simulcast on Youtube at: https://www.youtube.com/watch?app=desktop&v=VzMVvoEhwok
___________________________

As time allows, students will ask the following questions:

  1. How do you celebrate holidays in space?
  2. What dangers do you face on the International Space Station?
    ¿Qué peligros enfrentan en la estación espacial nacional?
  3. Does breathing feel different when you are on the space station, or does it feel about the same as breathing on earth?
  4. If Earth food has expiration dates, how does food in space stay in good condition for several months?
  5. What is the scariest thing that happened when you were in the spacecraft launching or landing or on the International Space Station?
  6. If there’s a power outage on Earth, how will that affect you?
  7. How does it feel to be able to find new discoveries to help humanity? What are some of the most recent discoveries?
  8. What precautions would be taken if a crew mate got sick?
  9. What is one piece of training that has been the most useful to you?
  10. Mike Hopkins is currently the only Space Force Astronaut and he switched from USAF to USSF while aboard the ISS. Will there be more Space Force Astronauts and how many?
  11. Milan (AAE 6th grade):  How does living in space with artificial light, recycled air, and close quarters affect one’s mental health?
  12. Do the stars look different from space than they do from Earth? Are they brighter? Are they clearer? Are there more of them?
    ¿Se ven diferentes las estrellas en el espacio que en latierra? Hay muchas estrellas?
  13. Does each person on the ISS have a specific role? What is your role and what is your day like on the International Space Station completing your role?
  14. What do you do if the person guiding you from Earth loses connection?
  15. What meal will you get first when you come back to Earth?
  16. How did it affect you when you saw the Earth from a different perspective while you were on the International Space Station?
  17. What has been the most surprising experience or feeling since you’ve launched?
  18. What happens if a machine starts breaking down on the International Space Station?
  19. What is your favorite thing to do during your spare time on the International Space Station?
  20. How might being part of Space Force Junior ROTC help me toward a NASA/Space Force career?
    ________________________________

ARISS News Release                                                                                    No.   22-01

ARISS Contact Scheduled for Participants at Scouts Victoria (Radio and Electronics Team), Mt Waverley, Victoria, Australia

January 3, 2022—Amateur Radio on the International Space Station (ARISS) has received schedule confirmation for an ARISS radio contact with astronauts. ARISS is the group that puts together special amateur radio contacts between students around the globe and crew members with ham radio licenses on the International Space Station (ISS).

This will be a telebridge contact via amateur radio and students will take turns asking their questions of Astronaut Mark Vande Hei, amateur radio call sign KG5GNP. Local Covid-19 protocols are adhered to as applicable for each ARISS contact. The downlink frequency for this contact is 145.800 MHZ and may be heard by listeners that are within the ISS-footprint that also encompasses the telebridge station.

ARISS team member Fred Kemmerer, using his call sign AB1OC in New Hampshire, will serve as the ARISS relay amateur radio station.

The ARISS radio contact is scheduled for January 4, 2022 at 10:27 pm AEDT (Mt Waverley, AU), (11:27 UTC, 6:27 am EST, 5:27 am CST, 4:27 am MST and 3:27 am PST).

The Victorian Scout Jamboree is a week-long event that has enabled over 4000 scouts, venturers, rovers and leaders to travel to Elmore in Central Victoria for 10 days of excitement and fun. The scout organizers’ goal is to provide an adventurous, fun, challenging and inclusive program for youth, teaching them life skills and leadership. During the event, the Radio and Electronics Team will be providing radio and electronics related support and activities for scouts of all ages and abilities, which include STEM-related activities while also promoting amateur radio training (radio participation and license qualification).  
_____________________________

As time allows, students will ask these questions:

  1. What 3 things do you miss from Earth? My Mum worked on a ship and missed; sleeping with the window open, the smell of cut grass and the sound of rain on the roof.
  2. What do you have to do to become an astronaut?
  3. What would happen if someone were seriously ill on the ISS, and what would you do?
  4. How do you prepare and eat your meals while up in the space station?
  5. What is it like to float around in no gravity without friction?
  6. How does it feel going from zero gravity in space back to earth’s gravity? Does it hurt??
  7. What is the scariest thing to happen to you whilst you have been in space?
  8. How do you shower and go to the toilet in space?
  9. After being in the space station for so many months, how does it feel to experience planet Earth and nature again with all your senses, especially smell?
  10. How do the seasons affect the veggie production system on the ISS? How often do you get to eat fresh food?
  11. Did you always want to be an astronaut and how did you make it happen?
  12. Why do people go into space and how long is an average mission?
  13. If you only had the chance to go to into space 1 time but only live till 30 or not going into space at all/not being able to see the stars or the milky way and live to over 70, which would you choose?
  14. Can you share some of the science that was worked on in space that we can now see on earth?
  15. Is there sound or much noise in space?
  16. Multiple nations have had space stations each bestowed with a specific name – Russia had Mir, NASA had Skylab and China Tiangong-1. As a truly international effort and the largest man-made object in space, does the ISS have a nickname or is there a name that the astronauts use for the individual components?
  17. What energy supply do you use to power the station. If nuclear, what type of reactor do you use? If solar, how many solar panels do you use, and what are their power density?
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