As of March 2, 2024

ARISS News Release                                            No. 24-13

ARISS Contact is Scheduled with Students at IES Pedro Simón Abril High School, Alcaraz, Spain

March 01, 2024—Amateur Radio on the International Space Station (ARISS) has received schedule confirmation for an ARISS radio contact between an astronaut aboard the International Space Station (ISS) and students at the IES Pedro Simón Abril High School located in Alcaraz, Spain.  ARISS conducts 60-100 of these special amateur radio contacts each year between students around the globe and crew members with ham radio licenses aboard the ISS.

IES Pedro Simón Abril High School provides secondary education, including a STEM curriculum, for students from 14 different towns in the area. The school established a Space Science-oriented cooperation program with Universidad de Castilla-La Mancha. Four years of hands-on activities have allowed students to learn about ARISS and prepare for this ARISS contact. Students (with help from local ham operators) have built and maintained a local FM amateur radio station (Studio21 project), allowing them to learn about radio science and radio equipment. Students have also tracked the ISS to download SSTV images during ISS SSTV events, and listen to contacts between ham operators transmitting through the ISS. Students are also setting up a school amateur radio ground station.

This will be a telebridge Contact via Amateur Radio allowing students to ask their questions of astronaut Loral O’Hara, amateur radio call sign KI5TOM. The downlink frequency for this contact is 145.800 MHz and may be heard by listeners that are within the ISS-footprint that also encompasses the telebridge station.

The ARISS amateur radio ground station (telebridge station) for this contact is in Greenbelt, Maryland, U.S. The amateur radio volunteer team at the ground station will use the callsign K6DUE, to establish and maintain the ISS connection.

The ARISS radio contact is scheduled for March 4, 2024 at 12:21 pm CET (Alcaraz, Spain) (11:21 UTC, 6:21 am EST, 5:21 am CST, 4:21 am MST, 3:21 am PST).

The public is invited to watch the live stream at:  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9Xgk4YZT5w4
_________________________
As time allows, students will ask these questions:
1. How does a geomagnetic storm affect the ISS?
2. Can the ARISS radio be used as an emergency backup in case other communication links fail?
3. What is your opinion on space tourism?
4. How did you spend your time as your spacecraft was on its way to the ISS?
5. What did you feel when the launch vehicle stages separated?
6. Are the vegetables you grow there as tasty as the ones we grow on Earth?
7. If you went to the Moon or Mars, would you like to still be able to communicate with students from all around the world as we are doing now?
8. Is it possible to observe or photograph our village from the Cupola?
9. Do you listen to music using streaming services as we do? What genres do you and the rest of the crew like?
10. How do you adapt your sleeping patterns to the 16 sunrises and sunsets you experience each day?
11. Which is your favorite spacesuit?
12. What is the most unexpected thing you have learned during your time in space?
13. Are there any practices that you do on the ISS that you think could be applied for everyday life on Earth?
14. How do the stars and other celestial bodies appear different when viewed from the ISS compared to Earth?
15. Is underwater spacewalk training accurate?
16. Do you think Mixed Reality could be some day applied to EVA spacesuit helmets?
17. Do you believe the speed of light will limit deep space travel and communications?
18. Are helicopters such as Ingenuity the future for robotic planetary exploration?
19. Could you tell us one everyday life thing that is easier to do in space than on Earth?
20. Is Artificial Intelligence used on the ISS as of today?
______________________________________

ARISS News Release                                              No. 24-12

ARISS Contact is Scheduled with Students at Girl Scout Troop 1089, Sacramento, California, USA

February 19, 2024—Amateur Radio on the International Space Station (ARISS) has received schedule confirmation for an ARISS radio contact between an astronaut aboard the International Space Station (ISS) and youth members in Girl Scout Troop 1089 located in Sacramento, CA.  ARISS conducts 60-100 of these special amateur radio contacts each year between students around the globe and crew members with ham radio licenses aboard the ISS.

This Girl Scout Project with ARISS has been undertaken and implemented by Senior and Ambassador Scouts (high school) from various Troops within the greater Sacramento area. In preparation for this ARISS contact, Girl Scout Troop 1089 conducted an educational program (Space and Stem Educational Activities and Experience) of seven sessions designed for Senior and Ambassador Girl Scouts, representing ages 14-18, grades 9-12. By earning their “Space Science Master Badge” and “STEM Career Exploration Badge” and participating in this ARISS contact, the Girl Scout leaders hope this will inspire an interest in science, technology, engineering, arts and math (STEAM) fields among the attendees. Session activities allowed girls to build/tune a small radio, learn about web software defined radio, research the experiments occurring on the ISS, and learn about careers in the space sciences. They also learned to work a ham radio station that will download Slow Scan TV images. Girl Scout Troop 1089 is actively working with members of the River City Amateur Radio Communications Society (N6NA) who have provided lessons in radio communication, amateur radio, and STEM fields as part of the seven sessions.   

This will be a direct contact via Amateur Radio allowing students to ask their questions of astronaut Jasmin Moghbeli, amateur radio call sign KI5WSL. The downlink frequency for this contact is 145.800 MHz and may be heard by listeners that are within the ISS-footprint that also encompasses the relay ground station.

The amateur radio ground station for this contact is in Sacramento, CA. Amateur radio operators using call sign N6NA, will operate the ground station to establish and maintain the ISS connection.

The ARISS radio contact is scheduled for February 22, 2024 at 10:26 am PST (CA) (18:26 UTC, 1:26 pm EST, 12:26 pm CST, 11:26 am MST).

The public is invited to watch the live stream at: https://youtube.com/live/-pc-8FqHBTw – early entry 9:15 and https://fb.me/e/3xnJgypOa
_____________________________
As time allows, students will ask these questions:
1. What is the strangest thing to happen to you on the ISS?
2. What are some of the experiments you are working on? What is your favorite?
3. What are you most looking forward to when you return to Earth?
4. What are some things you will miss about space once you are back on Earth?
5. What advice would you give someone who wants to be where you are?
6. The first time you took off from Earth were you scared?  What was it like?
7. Do you think we will find evidence of life beyond Earth?
8. How do you get supplies from Earth?
9. Are your experiments mostly biological or technological?
10. How do solar flares affect you and the Space Station?
11. Do you listen to music or PodCasts in space? If so, what?
12. Do you have any free time? If so, what do you do during it?
13. Do you really eat astronaut ice cream? What is your favorite flavor?
14. What happens if there is an emergency with the Station itself?
15. What is your deepest worry while on the ISS?
16. What is the hardest part of being an astronaut?
17. What is the average day on the ISS like for you?
18. Would you live on Mars if you could?
19. What is your favorite part of being an astronaut?
20. Do all astronauts perform experiments or do some focus on science while others focus on the maintenance of the space station or something else?

_______________________________

ARISS News Release                                              No. 24-11

ARISS Contact is Scheduled with Students at B. Russell High School, Rome, Italy

February 13, 2024—Amateur Radio on the International Space Station (ARISS) has received schedule confirmation for an ARISS radio contact between an astronaut aboard the International Space Station (ISS) and students at the B. Russell High School located in Rome, Italy.  ARISS conducts 60-100 of these special amateur radio contacts each year between students around the globe and crew members with ham radio licenses aboard the ISS.

The B. Russell High School curriculum is organized into Classical, Linguistic, and Scientific courses with the current school year having 59 classes with a total of 1395 students. Students study mechanics, thermodynamics, optics, algebra, Cartesian and Euclidean geometry, and probability. In higher grade levels they study classical electromagnetism, modern physics, and mathematical analysis. Throughout their course of study, students have opportunities to take advanced courses, sometimes in collaboration with universities, including cryptography, astronomy, meteorology and climatology, and electromagnetism. To prepare for this ARISS contact, students have built circuits and antennas to study electromagnetic fields (propagation and reception), and collected and analyzed data from weather sensors. Students are also learning about astronomy that include practical observational activities using telescopes. The course in astronomy covers the main topics of modern astronomy and astrophysics, from the formation of the Solar System, to theories of stellar evolution. Prior to the ARISS contact, students have also been learning about the ISS and space exploration. Members of the Italian Amateur Radio Association (ARI) section of Rome, are also providing technical training to the students, and are responsible for this direct ARISS contact event.

This will be a direct contact via Amateur Radio allowing students to ask their questions of astronaut Jasmin Moghbeli, amateur radio call sign KI5WSL. The downlink frequency for this contact is 145.800 MHz and may be heard by listeners that are within the ISS-footprint that also encompasses the relay ground station.

The amateur radio ground station for this contact is in Rome, Italy. Amateur radio operators using call sign IKØUSO, will operate the ground station to establish and maintain the ISS connection.

The ARISS radio contact is scheduled for February 15, 2024 at 12:32 pm CET (Italy) (11:32 UTC, 6:32 am EST, 5:32 am CST, 4:32 am MST, 3:32 am PST).

The public is invited to watch the live stream at: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=R0YEgMvzbn8

_______________________________
As time allows, students will ask these questions:
1. What progress has been made in research on plants in space and what impact could it have on future extraterrestrial cultivation?
2. In your experiments, are you doing any research which has to do with new solutions to climate change?
3. How will artificial intelligence influence the life and research of astronauts?
4. In simple terms, can you explain what the PROMETEO II project is about?
5. What technological challenges do you think are crucial to overcome in order to make presence in space more sustainable and comfortable in the long term?
6. You are carrying out studies on the cardiovascular system. Could the results obtained be applied, for example, in the development of new aeronautical technologies?
7. If a person gets sick while being in a closed space, what can be done to avoid the passage of viruses and apply the consequent treatment?
8. How does the perception of time and space change during a prolonged space mission?
9. How do you deal whit long-term physical changes, such as loss of bone density while in space?
10. What are the physical tests that an astronaut must pass?
11. What is standard procedure in the case of fire?
12. In the event of a breakdown in the carbon dioxide disposal machinery what should the astronauts do? (Hoping it never happens)
13. How important is the collaboration between all astronauts to achieve the required objectives?
14. What is the impact experienced by the body caused by the absence of gravity?
15. Do you follow a specific diet before going into space?
16. How does physical activity play a vital role for astronauts inside the space station?
17. What is the purpose of future space exploration?
18. What kind of biological experiments do you have to carry out on board?
19. How can we keep up a hypothetical supply chain for future colonies and bases on Mars and on the moon? (Is it possible, perhaps, to develop a system for a complete self-sufficiency)
20. What studies must one complete to become an astronaut?
________________________

ARISS News Release                                               No. 24-10

ARISS Contact is Scheduled with Students at School of Telecommunications Engineering, ETSIT Valencia (Universitat Politecnica de Valencia), Valencia, Spain

February 6, 2024 —Amateur Radio on the International Space Station (ARISS) has received schedule confirmation for an ARISS radio contact between an astronaut aboard the International Space Station (ISS) and students at the School of Telecommunications Engineering located in Valencia, Spain.  ARISS conducts 60-100 of these special amateur radio contacts each year between students around the globe and crew members with ham radio licenses aboard the ISS.

The School of Telecommunications Engineering, ETSIT Valencia, of the Universitat Politecnica de Valencia (UPV), is coordinating this ARISS contact, which will be a milestone in the two-year course “Space for Kids, How to Design and Build a Nanosatellite” for teachers from 8 secondary and high schools. About 160 students, 14-17 years old, are also involved in this space hands-on project, which has been integrated into various courses such as; Access to space and space environment, Satellite communication, Satellite mission design, and Testing our mission in Earth (how to analyze data). The Earth station that will be used for this ARISS contact is located at UPV (School of Telecommunications) and has been built specifically for this contact providing the students technical experience in ham satellite communications. Members of the University’s Radio Club and school faculty will be supporting this contact and have been helping with activities for high school students such as antenna workshops and satellite receiver workshops.

This will be a direct contact via Amateur Radio allowing students to ask their questions of astronaut Loral O’Hara, amateur radio call sign KI5TOM. The downlink frequency for this contact is 145.800 MHz and may be heard by listeners that are within the ISS-footprint that also encompasses the relay ground station.

The amateur radio ground station for this contact is in Valencia, Spain. Amateur radio operators using call sign EA5RKP, will operate the ground station to establish and maintain the ISS connection.

The ARISS radio contact is scheduled for February 9, 2024 at 9:12:46 am CET (Valencia, Spain) (8:12:46 UTC, 3:12 am EST, 2:12 am CST, 1:12 am MST, 12:12 am PST).

The public is invited to watch the live stream at: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_IMdKcM2Fw8
_____________________________
As time allows, students will ask these questions:
1. What experiment are you working on?
2. Has your perspective on life changed after being on the ISS?
3. What would you like to achieve by working as an astronaut?
4. How do you communicate and maintain contact with your loved ones on Earth?
5. If a biological virus is detected, what is the protocol to follow? Can a biological virus be detected on the spacecraft?
6. How do you maintain your fitness in space? How does the state of weightlessness mainly affect you?
7. What is your area of study and expertise? And how did you train for the space station program?
8. How did you feel when you experienced zero gravity for the first time?
9. What is the most complicated part of launching into space?
10. What are the safety measures implemented to protect the space station against possible space debris impacts?
11. Are the laws that govern the ISS like maritime laws or the laws of the country that owns the module?
12. What is day to day like on the ISS? Is there an established routine?
13. How do you manage the temperature in the space station?
14. What advice would you give to those who want to become astronauts?
15. How do you manage to navigate the ship so easily when all the modules appear uniform?
16. How does microgravity impact the effectiveness of the scientific experiments being carried out on the space station and what notable discoveries have emerged so far?
17. What are the best and worst aspects of your mission?
18. What was your motivation to be an astronaut? When was it clear?
19. What was the hardest part of your training?
20. What has been your most amazing moment in space?
___________________________

 

ARISS News Release                                                No. 24-09

ARISS Contact is Scheduled with Students at Lilburn Elementary School, Lilburn, Georgia, USA

February 6, 2024—Amateur Radio on the International Space Station (ARISS) has received schedule confirmation for an ARISS radio contact between an astronaut aboard the International Space Station (ISS) and students at the Lilburn Elementary School located in Lilburn, GA.  ARISS conducts 60-100 of these special amateur radio contacts each year between students around the globe and crew members with ham radio licenses aboard the ISS.

Lilburn is a K-5, Title I, public school serving nearly 1,350 students, ages 5-11 years. The school’s current curriculum includes relevant STEM and Computer Science topics across all grade levels and disciplines. In advance of this ARISS contact, students have also been learning more about Earth’s systems, robotics, and emergency communications. In STEM classes, students used the Design Thinking Process to solve real-world problems in space such as how people can one day live on the moon, designing solutions for the spidernaut experiment, as well as how to grow food in space. Computer science and STEM teachers that attended a Space Pioneers Amateur Radio Kit Initiative (SPARKI) workshop then showed students, using lessons and activities, how to communicate through radio. For example, fifth graders in STEM classes built a modified telegraph to communicate between classrooms using the telegraph key.  In the electricity unit, students used circuit kits (like the ones provided by SPARKI) and Makey-Makey kits to create simple circuits. The school is working with members of the Gwinnett American Radio Society (GARS), ARRL, and the North Fulton Amateur Radio League (NFARL). Members of these local ham radio organizations (NRARL) will help with the technical aspects of ham radio operation on the campus and with conducting the ARISS contact.

This will be a direct contact via Amateur Radio allowing students to ask their questions of astronaut Jasmin Moghbeli, amateur radio call sign KI5WSL. The downlink frequency for this contact is 145.800 MHz and may be heard by listeners that are within the ISS-footprint that also encompasses the relay ground station.

The amateur radio ground station for this contact is in Lilburn, GA. Amateur radio operators using call sign K4RGK, will operate the ground station to establish and maintain the ISS connection.

The ARISS radio contact is scheduled for February 7, 2024 at 9:24 am EST (GA, USA) (14:24 UTC, 8:24 am CST, 7:24 am MST, 6:24 am PST).

The public is invited to watch the live stream at:  http://www.youtube.com/channel/UCuI4sKDBpERtEFs9bFrRMFA/live
________________________

As time allows, students will ask these questions:

1. Our teachers help us focus not just on academics, but on emotional health as well. I would like to know, how are YOU doing?
2. What is the grossest thing about living in space?
3. Our school has many gardens that students help take care of. What kinds of plants are you growing on the ISS?
4. Have you ever had a big emergency in Space? If so, what was the situation?
5. What’s it like working with astronauts from other countries?
6. How long and how often do you have to wear the space suit, and do you get tired of it?
7. Have you read the Dog Man Books? If not, what kinds of books do you enjoy reading most?
8. What is something that surprised you that you didn’t expect about living in space?
9. What is your favorite hobby that is not space related?
10. What is the most important thing you have to do on the ISS when you wake up?
11. What are you looking forward to the most when you return to Earth?
12. How do you entertain yourself on the ISS?
13. How did your family react to the news that you would be going to the ISS?
14. Can you plant a flower in your area, or how do you personalize your area while you are living on the ISS to bring you joy?
15. Besides astronaut training with your space agency, how did you personally prepare for your journey to the ISS?
16. Can you see weather systems on Earth from space and if so, what have you observed?
17. How would kinetic sand behave in space?
18. What character traits do you think make a great astronaut?
19. What do you get tired of while being in space?
20. What is a typical day like on the ISS?
______________________________

ARISS News Release                                       No. 24-07

ARISS Contact is Scheduled with Students at Alabama School of Cyber Technology and Engineering (ASCTE), Huntsville, Alabama USA

January 30, 2024—Amateur Radio on the International Space Station (ARISS) has received schedule confirmation for an ARISS radio contact between an astronaut aboard the International Space Station (ISS) and students at the Alabama School of Cyber Technology and Engineering (ASCTE) in Huntsville, AL.  ARISS conducts 60 – 100 of these special amateur radio contacts each year between students around the globe and crew members with ham radio licenses aboard the ISS.

The ASCTE is a statewide, residential magnet high school that began operating in 2020 in its temporary home on the campus of Oakwood University, and since 2022 is now in its permanent home in the middle of Cummings Research Park in Huntsville. For the 2023-24 school year ASCTE has 334 enrolled with 112 students living on campus. In 2023, ASCTE signed a Memorandum of Understanding with Marshall Space Flight Center, creating a partnership with NASA.

The ASCTE Amateur Radio Club (N4CTE) was formed in the fall of 2022 and has thrived with generous support from the ARRL and assistance from the Huntsville Amateur Radio Club. Student interest in the school ham radio club led to offering an elective course in RF Engineering during the 2023-24 school year. Students in this class have been learning about radio communications and gaining hands-on experience with amateur radio equipment. Several departments (from science to the humanities to cybersecurity) have also incorporated space-related lessons in preparation for this ARISS contact. Members of the Huntsville Amateur Radio Club will be assisting ASCTE in the technical aspects of this ARISS contact and have been preparing the students for this contact.

This will be a direct contact via Amateur Radio allowing students to ask their questions of astronaut Jasmin Moghbeli, amateur radio call sign KI5WSL. The downlink frequency for this contact is 145.800 MHz and may be heard by listeners that are within the ISS-footprint that also encompasses the relay ground station.

The amaeur radio ground station for this contact is in Huntsville, AL. Amateur radio operators using call sign N4CTE, will operate the ground station to establish and maintain the ISS connection.

The ARISS radio contact is scheduled for February 1, 2024 at 11:34:50 am CST (Huntsville, AL) (17:34:50 UTC, 12:34 pm EST, 10:34 am MST, 9:34 am PST).
__________________
As time allows, students will ask these questions:

1. What do you and the others up there do for fun?
2. Are you worried about cyber vulnerabilities on the space station, and if you are, what plans are in place to counteract them?
3. How is the station protected from micro debris?
4. How if at all has 3D printing been used lately on the station?
5. What sparked your interest in becoming an astronaut and how old were you when you figured it out?
6. Did you go to college and pick a major with the intention of being an astronaut?
7. Have you ever broken anything on the ISS?
8. How is the ISS actually maneuvered?
9. What was your scariest experience as an astronaut?
10. Do you face any unique physiological changes after spending a lot of time in space?
11. What software tools like Excel and Matlab do you use?
12. What mental health support do you have on the station?
13. If you were to start over would you still choose to be an astronaut and if not what would you choose instead?
14. What kind of exercise do you do in space to stay fit?
15. What experiments or research projects are you currently working on in the unique microgravity environment of the space station?
16. Is solar power the only form of energy on the station?
17. What should I do if I want to become an astronaut?
18. If there is an emergency on the station what do you do first?
19. How do you manage daily activities like eating, sleeping, and exercising in the confined space of the space station, and how does it differ from life on Earth?
20. What does the ISS smell like?
_____________________

 

ARISS News Release                                       No. 24-06

ARISS Contact is Scheduled with Students at Bilingual Montessori School of Lund (Stiftelsen BMSL), Lund, Sweden

January 30, 2024—Amateur Radio on the International Space Station (ARISS) has received schedule confirmation for an ARISS radio contact between an Axiom Mission (Ax-3) astronaut aboard the International Space Station (ISS) and students at the Stiftelsen BMSL located in Lund, Sweden.  ARISS conducts 60 -100 of these special amateur radio contacts each year between students around the globe and crew members with ham radio licenses aboard the ISS.

BMSL was established in 2003 for children aged 1 to 16, using the National Swedish Curriculum. The school employs Montessori-inspired pedagogy and language immersion teaching English and French from preschool and starting in grade 6, teaching Spanish.

This will be a telebridge Contact via Amateur Radio allowing students to ask their questions of astronaut Marcus Wandt, amateur radio call sign KJ5COO. Wandt has over 20 years of aviation experience with the Swedish Air Force as a fighter pilot, squadron commander, wing commander, and chief test pilot. He will be the second ESA astronaut of Swedish nationality to ever go to the International Space Station and will serve as a mission specialist during Axiom Space’s Ax-3 mission.

Wandt is honored to have this opportunity to not only achieve one of his greatest life’s dreams, but also to use the Ax-3 mission to ignite a passion for STEM education in teachers and students worldwide to each pursue their ambitions. The downlink frequency for this contact is 145.800 MHz and may be heard by listeners that are within the ISS-footprint that also encompasses the telebridge station.

The ARISS amateur radio ground station (telebridge station) for this contact is in Glenden, Australia. The amateur radio volunteer team at the ground station will use the call sign VK4KHZ, to establish and maintain the ISS connection.

The ARISS radio contact is scheduled for January 31, 2024 at 1:50:25 pm CET(Sweden) (12:50:25 UTC, 7:50 am EST, 6:50 am CST, 5:50 am MST, 4:50 am PST).

The public is invited to watch the live stream at: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=G72VqFDlh0g
_________________________
As time allows, students will ask these questions:
Translation (from Swedish):

1. What does a typical day look like on the ISS?
2. How do you eat in space, and does the food taste different?
3. What kind of research are you conducting?
4. Which of your experiments can improve our lives on Earth?
5. How does it feel to be weightless, can it be compared to any other sensation?
6. What does the moon look like from the ISS?
7. Would you like to be the first human landing on Mars?
8. How do you poop in space?
9. How do you shower, Marcus? The water should be flying in all directions, right?
10. How does being in space affect your body?
11. How do you manage conflicts between crew members?
12. Do you think your values will change now that you have been in space?
13. What did you feel during the rocket liftoff?
14. Can you use your Smartphone with the Starlink satellites to contact your family from the ISS?
15. How did you prepare for weightlessness?
16. How can the fire stay on the rocket in space?
17. How does the cockpit of the Dragon module look like?
18. How do you know you won’t get lost in space?
19. Does life in space have effects on your body and your mood?
20. What does the education look like to become an astronaut?

Translation (English to Swedish for questions that will be asked in English):

3*. Class 8A (14-15): Vilken typ av forskning bedriver du?
4*. Class 9A (15-16): Vilka av dina experiment kan f rb ttra v rt liv p jorden?
7*. Class 8B (14-15): Skulle du vilja vara den f rsta m nniskan som landar p Mars?
11*. Class 9B (15-16): Hur hanterar du konflikter mellan bes ttningsmedlemmar?
14*. Class 7A (13:14): Kan du anv nda din smartphone med Startlink-satelliterna f r att kontakta din familj fr n ISS?
________________________________________

 

ARISS News Release                                       No. 24-05

ARISS Contact is Scheduled with Students at Bandırma Şehit Güvenç Anatolian High School, Balikesir, Bandırma, Türkiye

January 30, 2024—Amateur Radio on the International Space Station (ARISS) has received schedule confirmation for an ARISS radio contact between an Axiom Mission (Ax-3) astronaut aboard the International Space Station (ISS) and students at the Bandırma Şehit Güvenç Anatolian High School, Balikesir, Bandırma, Türkiye. ARISS conducts 60 – 100 of these special amateur radio contacts each year between students around the globe and crew members with ham radio licenses aboard the ISS.

This will be a telebridge Contact via Amateur Radio allowing students to ask their questions of astronaut Alper Gezeravci, amateur radio call sign KJ5DIY/TA5TRU. As a fighter pilot with the Turkish Air Force, Gezeravcı has 15 years of flying experience on multiple aircrafts including the T-41, SF-260, T-37, T-38, F-5, KC-135 and F-16. In addition, he served as a captain with the Turkish Airlines for seven years. Gezeravcı has also served as a flight leader, flight safety officer, and commercial airlines captain. He is now serving as a mission specialist for Axiom Space’s Ax-3 mission to the ISS on the SpaceX Dragon.

Born in Silifke, Türkiye, Gezeravci is honored to be a part of the Ax-3 mission as the first Turkish astronaut to go to space. Through the Ax-3 mission, Gezeravcı hopes to inspire the next generation of explorers and ignite a passion for STEM education in teachers and students worldwide to each pursue their ambitions. The downlink frequency for this contact is 145.800 MHz and may be heard by listeners that are within the ISS-footprint that also encompasses the telebridge station.

The ARISS amateur radio ground station (telebridge station) for this contact is in Casale Monferrato, Italy. The amateur radio volunteer team at the ground station will use the call sign, IK1SLD to establish and maintain the ISS connection.

The ARISS radio contact is scheduled for January 31, 2024 at 15:12:57 pm EEST (Turkey) (12:12:57 UTC, 7:12 am EST, 6:12 am CST, 5:12 am MST, 4:12 PST).

The public is invited to watch the live stream at: http://www.ariotti.com/
_________________________
As time allows, students will ask these questions:

1. How does it feel to be in space?
2. Could you provide us with some information about the International Space Station? What kind of place is it?
3. Where will you land after the mission?
4. What kind of experiments are you conducting on the International Space Station?
5. What contributions have or will the experiments you conduct on the International Space Station make to us?
6. Will you share some photos with us from space? Were you able to record some videos there?
7. How does being Türkiye’s first astronaut make you feel? Do you feel privileged?
8. As an astronaut with a background with fighter pilot, what were the most challenging and comfortable aspects of being an astronaut in the microgravity when compared to being a fighter pilot?
9. What is it like to watch the Earth from space?
10. What is the first thing you want to do after returning to Earth?
11. What did you feel from the moment you were strapped into the seat during the launch process?
12. How much G-force did you experience during launch? How did it affect you?
13. Can you tell us a bit about the experiments you are conducting on the International Space Station? What are the results of these experiments, and where and how will they be used?
14. What kind of infrastructure do you use when conducting experiments?
15. During experiments, do you have the opportunity to establish contact with Earth and receive support?
16. What is it like to sleep in microgravity? Do you have a private room on the International Space Station?
17. What is the most important characteristic in an astronaut that has caught your attention? Can anyone become an astronaut?
18. What kind of foods do you eat in International Space Station?
19. Do you have any activity with other astronauts to have some fun?
20. Would you like to stay in International Space Station more than 14 days?
_______________________________

ARISS News Release                                       No. 24-04

ARISS Contact is Scheduled with Students at Ömer Cemile Güler Imam Hatip Secondary School, Selçuklu, Konya, Turkey

January 29, 2024—Amateur Radio on the International Space Station (ARISS) has received schedule confirmation for an ARISS radio contact between an Axiom Mission (Ax-3) astronaut aboard the International Space Station (ISS) and students at Ömer Cemile Güler Imam Hatip Secondary School, Konya, Selçuklu, Türkiye.  ARISS conducts 60 – 100 of these special amateur radio contacts each year between students around the globe and crew members with ham radio licenses aboard the ISS.

This will be a telebridge contact via Amateur Radio allowing students to ask their questions of astronaut Alper Gezeravci, amateur radio call sign KJ5DIY/TA5TRU. As a fighter pilot with the Turkish Air Force, Gezeravcı has 15 years of flying experience on multiple aircrafts including the T-41, SF-260, T-37, T-38, F-5, KC-135 and F-16. In addition, he served as a captain with the Turkish Airlines for seven years. Gezeravcı has also served as a flight leader, flight safety officer, and commercial airlines captain. He is now serving as a mission specialist for Axiom Space’s Ax-3 mission to the ISS on the SpaceX Dragon.

Born in Silifke, Türkiye, Gezeravci is honored to be a part of the Ax-3 mission as the first Turkish astronaut to go to space. Through the Ax-3 mission, Gezeravcı hopes to inspire the next generation of explorers and ignite a passion for STEM education in teachers and students worldwide to each pursue their ambitions. The downlink frequency for this contact is 145.800 MHz and may be heard by listeners that are within the ISS-footprint that also encompasses the telebridge station.

The ARISS amateur radio ground station (telebridge station) for this contact is in Glenden, Australia. The amateur radio volunteer team at the ground station will use the call sign VK4KHZ, to establish and maintain the ISS connection.

The ARISS radio contact is scheduled for January 30, 2024 at 16:38:20 pm EEST (Turkey) (13:38:20 UTC, 8:38 am EST, 7:38 am CST, 6:38 am MST, 5:38 am PST)
____________________________

As time allows, students will ask these questions:

  1. How does it feel to look to the International Space Station from the Dragon spacecraft while approaching to dock?
  2. Are you going to have some adaptation period after landing to Earth since you are exposed to microgravity for 14 days in International Space Station?
  3. Besides yourself, which countries’ astronauts are currently active on the International Space Station? Can you communicate with them?
  4. What is the meal you miss the most while you’re there?
  5. How is life on the International Space Station, and how do your days pass? What do you do to spend your time?
  6. Although it hasn’t been a very long time, you are now farther from Earth than ever before. What is the thing you missed the most there?
  7. When you look from the windows, do you see any other satellite?
  8. Were you able to see Moon from the International Space Station?
  9. How is the air condition in ISS? Is it cold or hot?
  10. How was the docking process to the International Space Station? Were you excited?
  11. Which experiment did you enjoy most?
  12. How much time do you sleep?
  13. Do you wish to be back to International Space Station one more time?
  14. What kind of benefits the experiments that you made there provide us?
  15. What kind of foods do you eat in International Space Station?
  16. How does it feel to look Earth from Space?
  17. Would you like to set foot in another planet on the universe as an astronaut?
  18. What was the most challenging part of the mission until docking?
  19. Do you feel the high orbital speed of International Space Station which is approximately 7 km/s?
  20. Have you ever looked to the Türkiye from ISS? If yes, how does it feel?
    ________________________________

 

ARISS News Release                                       No. 24-03

ARISS Contact is Scheduled with Students at Istituto Comprensivo “Anna Rita Sidoti”, GioiosaMarea, Italy

January 22, 2024—Amateur Radio on the International Space Station (ARISS) has received schedule confirmation for an ARISS radio contact between an Axiom Mission (Ax-3) astronaut aboard the International Space Station (ISS) and students at the Anna Rita Sidoti Institute located in Gioiosa Marea, Italy.  ARISS conducts 60 -100 of these special amateur radio contacts each year between students around the globe and crew members with ham radio licenses aboard the ISS.

The Gioiosa Marea’s Institute “Anna Rita Sidoti”, serves about 730 students in three school levels; nursery, primary and lower secondary. The school will engage all students in preparation for this ARISS contact and is supported by local radio amateur members of the Italian Radioamateur Associaion (ARI) who will provide practical and technical support for the event.

This will be a direct contact via Amateur Radio allowing students to ask their questions of astronaut Walter Villadei, amateur radio call sign IUØRWB. Villadei is a colonel in the Italian Air Force (ItAF), and the pilot for Axiom Space’s Ax-3 mission to the ISS on the SpaceX Dragon. Villadei currently lives in Rome, Italy, and is honored to have this opportunity to not only achieve one of his greatest life’s dreams, but also to use the Ax-3 mission to ignite a passion for STEM education in teachers and students worldwide to each pursue their ambitions.  The downlink frequency for this contact is 145.800 MHz and may be heard by listeners that are within the ISS-footprint that also encompasses the relay ground station.

The amateur radio ground station for this contact is in Gioiosa Marea, Italy. The amateur radio volunteer team at the ground station will use the callsign IT9DBI, to establish and maintain the ISS connection.

The ARISS radio contact is scheduled for January 24, 2024 at 3:37:22 pm CET (Italy) (14:37:22 UTC, 9:37 am EST, 8:37 am CST, 7:37 am MST, 6:37 am PST).

The public is invited to watch the live stream at: https://www.icgioiosa.edu.it/2-uncategorised/1604-axiom-social-news-eventi-comunicati
______________________________
As time allows, students will ask these questions: (English Translation)
1. At what age did your passion for space begin?
2. In space can you surf the internet and use social media?
3. Can you cook hot food in the space or do you eat cold food from the refrigerator?
4. Which of an astronaut’s five senses is most affected by microgravity?
5. How and how much do you sleep in space?
6. How did you feel before leaving on a mission?
7. Have you ever seen unidentified objects outside the spacecraft?
8. How do you take care of your daily hygiene?
9. How did you prepare before leaving for space?
10. Do you ever get bored?
11. Do you experience good or bad sensations in a state of microgravity? Is it annoying to be in a state of microgravity after a while?
12. During this mission what type of research will you carry out?
13. How do you contact family members from space?
14. How do you use the toilets in Space?
15. What is the thing you miss most about the Earth?
16. What do you do in your free time on the space station?
17. Do any of you write a logbook?
18. How is time perceived in space?
19. Even though you have chosen to go on a space mission, and even though you have been physically and psychologically prepared, do you ever feel afraid?
20. Do you astronauts always float inside the space station, or is there a room with Earth’s gravity on board?
_________________________

 

ARISS News Release                                       No. 24-02

ARISS Contact is Scheduled with Students at Istituto Comprensivo di Villa Guardia, Villa Guardia, Italy

January 20, 2024—Amateur Radio on the International Space Station (ARISS) has received schedule confirmation for an ARISS radio contact between an Axiom Mission (Ax-3) astronaut aboard the International Space Station (ISS) and students at the IC di Villa Guardia located in Villa Guardia, Italy.  ARISS conducts 60-80 of these special amateur radio contacts each year between students around the globe and crew members with ham radio licenses aboard the ISS.

Istituto Comprensivo di Villa Guardia consists of three primary schools (with students aged 6 to 10) and two middle schools (students aged 11 to 13) and is located in Villa Guardia, near the city of Como, in northern Italy. The school’s STEM curriculum includes two hours of science, two hours of technology every week and employs a team of teachers providing both theoretical and practical teaching with scientific and technological experiences.

This will be a telebridge Contact via Amateur Radio allowing students to ask their questions of astronaut Walter Villadei, amateur radio call sign IUØRWB. Villadei is a colonel in the Italian Air Force (ItAF), and the pilot for Axiom Space’s Ax-3 mission to the ISS on the SpaceX Dragon. Villadei currently lives in Rome, Italy, and is honored to have this opportunity to not only achieve one of his greatest life’s dreams but also to use the Ax-3 mission to ignite a passion for STEM education in teachers and students worldwide to each pursue their ambitions.  The downlink frequency for this contact is 145.800 MHz and may be heard by listeners that are within the ISS-footprint that also encompasses the telebridge station.

The ARISS amateur radio ground station (telebridge station) for this contact is in Paardekraal, South Africa. The amateur radio volunteer team at the ground station will use the callsign ZS6JON, to establish and maintain the ISS connection.

The ARISS radio contact is scheduled for January 22, 2024 at 10:35:49 am CET (Italy) (9:35:49 UTC, 4:35 am EST, 3:35 am CST, 2:35 am MST, 1:35 am PST).

The public is invited to watch the live stream at https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gMQUWMww9yE
_____________________________
As time allows, students will ask these questions: (Translation)
1. How does an astronaut prepare himself to face a mission?
2. What kind of emotion did you feel at the first launch?
3. During your training, did you get new habits, that you still use in normal life?
4. Why did you choose to do this job?
5. How long have you studied to become an astronaut?
6. What do you like about this job?
7. What is your work goal?
8. What does the Earth look like from up there?
9. What’s the most fascinating thing you have ever seen in space?
10. Have you ever heard strange noises coming from Space?
11. Are there any particular images of space seen from the ISS that you want to describe us?
12. Have you ever seen a comet from the ISS?
13. How is floating in microgravity?
14. Are the 5 senses perceived in space as they are on Earth?
15. What time do you set on the watch on the ISS, not being able to rely on sunrise and sunset?
16. How will you feel when you set foot on Earth again?
17. How long does rehabilitation take (once you return to Earth)?
18. What does it mean to you to represent humanity in space?
19. Could it be good for humans to bring a pet in space?
20. When you come back to Earth, how is feeling gravity again?
______________________________

 

ARISS News Release                                              No. 24-12

ARISS Contact is Scheduled with Students at Girl Scout Troop 1089, Sacramento, California, USA

February 19, 2024—Amateur Radio on the International Space Station (ARISS) has received schedule confirmation for an ARISS radio contact between an astronaut aboard the International Space Station (ISS) and youth members in Girl Scout Troop 1089 located in Sacramento, CA.  ARISS conducts 60-100 of these special amateur radio contacts each year between students around the globe and crew members with ham radio licenses aboard the ISS.

This Girl Scout Project with ARISS has been undertaken and implemented by Senior and Ambassador Scouts (high school) from various Troops within the greater Sacramento area. In preparation for this ARISS contact, Girl Scout Troop 1089 conducted an educational program (Space and Stem Educational Activities and Experience) of seven sessions designed for Senior and Ambassador Girl Scouts, representing ages 14-18, grades 9-12. By earning their “Space Science Master Badge” and “STEM Career Exploration Badge” and participating in this ARISS contact, the Girl Scout leaders hope this will inspire an interest in science, technology, engineering, arts and math (STEAM) fields among the attendees. Session activities allowed girls to build/tune a small radio, learn about web software defined radio, research the experiments occurring on the ISS, and learn about careers in the space sciences. They also learned to work a ham radio station that will download Slow Scan TV images. Girl Scout Troop 1089 is actively working with members of the River City Amateur Radio Communications Society (N6NA) who have provided lessons in radio communication, amateur radio, and STEM fields as part of the seven sessions.   

This will be a direct contact via Amateur Radio allowing students to ask their questions of astronaut Jasmin Moghbeli, amateur radio call sign KI5WSL. The downlink frequency for this contact is 145.800 MHz and may be heard by listeners that are within the ISS-footprint that also encompasses the relay ground station.

The amateur radio ground station for this contact is in Sacramento, CA. Amateur radio operators using call sign N6NA, will operate the ground station to establish and maintain the ISS connection.

The ARISS radio contact is scheduled for February 22, 2024 at 10:26 am PST (CA) (18:26 UTC, 1:26 pm EST, 12:26 pm CST, 11:26 am MST).

The public is invited to watch the live stream at: https://youtube.com/live/-pc-8FqHBTw – early entry 9:15 and https://fb.me/e/3xnJgypOa
_____________________________
As time allows, students will ask these questions:
1. What is the strangest thing to happen to you on the ISS?
2. What are some of the experiments you are working on? What is your favorite?
3. What are you most looking forward to when you return to Earth?
4. What are some things you will miss about space once you are back on Earth?
5. What advice would you give someone who wants to be where you are?
6. The first time you took off from Earth were you scared?  What was it like?
7. Do you think we will find evidence of life beyond Earth?
8. How do you get supplies from Earth?
9. Are your experiments mostly biological or technological?
10. How do solar flares affect you and the Space Station?
11. Do you listen to music or PodCasts in space? If so, what?
12. Do you have any free time? If so, what do you do during it?
13. Do you really eat astronaut ice cream? What is your favorite flavor?
14. What happens if there is an emergency with the Station itself?
15. What is your deepest worry while on the ISS?
16. What is the hardest part of being an astronaut?
17. What is the average day on the ISS like for you?
18. Would you live on Mars if you could?
19. What is your favorite part of being an astronaut?
20. Do all astronauts perform experiments or do some focus on science while others focus on the maintenance of the space station or something else?

_______________________________

ARISS News Release                                              No. 24-11

ARISS Contact is Scheduled with Students at B. Russell High School, Rome, Italy

February 13, 2024—Amateur Radio on the International Space Station (ARISS) has received schedule confirmation for an ARISS radio contact between an astronaut aboard the International Space Station (ISS) and students at the B. Russell High School located in Rome, Italy.  ARISS conducts 60-100 of these special amateur radio contacts each year between students around the globe and crew members with ham radio licenses aboard the ISS.

The B. Russell High School curriculum is organized into Classical, Linguistic, and Scientific courses with the current school year having 59 classes with a total of 1395 students. Students study mechanics, thermodynamics, optics, algebra, Cartesian and Euclidean geometry, and probability. In higher grade levels they study classical electromagnetism, modern physics, and mathematical analysis. Throughout their course of study, students have opportunities to take advanced courses, sometimes in collaboration with universities, including cryptography, astronomy, meteorology and climatology, and electromagnetism. To prepare for this ARISS contact, students have built circuits and antennas to study electromagnetic fields (propagation and reception), and collected and analyzed data from weather sensors. Students are also learning about astronomy that include practical observational activities using telescopes. The course in astronomy covers the main topics of modern astronomy and astrophysics, from the formation of the Solar System, to theories of stellar evolution. Prior to the ARISS contact, students have also been learning about the ISS and space exploration. Members of the Italian Amateur Radio Association (ARI) section of Rome, are also providing technical training to the students, and are responsible for this direct ARISS contact event.

This will be a direct contact via Amateur Radio allowing students to ask their questions of astronaut Jasmin Moghbeli, amateur radio call sign KI5WSL. The downlink frequency for this contact is 145.800 MHz and may be heard by listeners that are within the ISS-footprint that also encompasses the relay ground station.

The amateur radio ground station for this contact is in Rome, Italy. Amateur radio operators using call sign IKØUSO, will operate the ground station to establish and maintain the ISS connection.

The ARISS radio contact is scheduled for February 15, 2024 at 12:32 pm CET (Italy) (11:32 UTC, 6:32 am EST, 5:32 am CST, 4:32 am MST, 3:32 am PST).

The public is invited to watch the live stream at: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=R0YEgMvzbn8

_______________________________
As time allows, students will ask these questions:
1. What progress has been made in research on plants in space and what impact could it have on future extraterrestrial cultivation?
2. In your experiments, are you doing any research which has to do with new solutions to climate change?
3. How will artificial intelligence influence the life and research of astronauts?
4. In simple terms, can you explain what the PROMETEO II project is about?
5. What technological challenges do you think are crucial to overcome in order to make presence in space more sustainable and comfortable in the long term?
6. You are carrying out studies on the cardiovascular system. Could the results obtained be applied, for example, in the development of new aeronautical technologies?
7. If a person gets sick while being in a closed space, what can be done to avoid the passage of viruses and apply the consequent treatment?
8. How does the perception of time and space change during a prolonged space mission?
9. How do you deal whit long-term physical changes, such as loss of bone density while in space?
10. What are the physical tests that an astronaut must pass?
11. What is standard procedure in the case of fire?
12. In the event of a breakdown in the carbon dioxide disposal machinery what should the astronauts do? (Hoping it never happens)
13. How important is the collaboration between all astronauts to achieve the required objectives?
14. What is the impact experienced by the body caused by the absence of gravity?
15. Do you follow a specific diet before going into space?
16. How does physical activity play a vital role for astronauts inside the space station?
17. What is the purpose of future space exploration?
18. What kind of biological experiments do you have to carry out on board?
19. How can we keep up a hypothetical supply chain for future colonies and bases on Mars and on the moon? (Is it possible, perhaps, to develop a system for a complete self-sufficiency)
20. What studies must one complete to become an astronaut?
________________________

ARISS News Release                                               No. 24-10

ARISS Contact is Scheduled with Students at School of Telecommunications Engineering, ETSIT Valencia (Universitat Politecnica de Valencia), Valencia, Spain

February 6, 2024 —Amateur Radio on the International Space Station (ARISS) has received schedule confirmation for an ARISS radio contact between an astronaut aboard the International Space Station (ISS) and students at the School of Telecommunications Engineering located in Valencia, Spain.  ARISS conducts 60-100 of these special amateur radio contacts each year between students around the globe and crew members with ham radio licenses aboard the ISS.

The School of Telecommunications Engineering, ETSIT Valencia, of the Universitat Politecnica de Valencia (UPV), is coordinating this ARISS contact, which will be a milestone in the two-year course “Space for Kids, How to Design and Build a Nanosatellite” for teachers from 8 secondary and high schools. About 160 students, 14-17 years old, are also involved in this space hands-on project, which has been integrated into various courses such as; Access to space and space environment, Satellite communication, Satellite mission design, and Testing our mission in Earth (how to analyze data). The Earth station that will be used for this ARISS contact is located at UPV (School of Telecommunications) and has been built specifically for this contact providing the students technical experience in ham satellite communications. Members of the University’s Radio Club and school faculty will be supporting this contact and have been helping with activities for high school students such as antenna workshops and satellite receiver workshops.

This will be a direct contact via Amateur Radio allowing students to ask their questions of astronaut Loral O’Hara, amateur radio call sign KI5TOM. The downlink frequency for this contact is 145.800 MHz and may be heard by listeners that are within the ISS-footprint that also encompasses the relay ground station.

The amateur radio ground station for this contact is in Valencia, Spain. Amateur radio operators using call sign EA5RKP, will operate the ground station to establish and maintain the ISS connection.

The ARISS radio contact is scheduled for February 9, 2024 at 9:12:46 am CET (Valencia, Spain) (8:12:46 UTC, 3:12 am EST, 2:12 am CST, 1:12 am MST, 12:12 am PST).

The public is invited to watch the live stream at: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_IMdKcM2Fw8
_____________________________
As time allows, students will ask these questions:
1. What experiment are you working on?
2. Has your perspective on life changed after being on the ISS?
3. What would you like to achieve by working as an astronaut?
4. How do you communicate and maintain contact with your loved ones on Earth?
5. If a biological virus is detected, what is the protocol to follow? Can a biological virus be detected on the spacecraft?
6. How do you maintain your fitness in space? How does the state of weightlessness mainly affect you?
7. What is your area of study and expertise? And how did you train for the space station program?
8. How did you feel when you experienced zero gravity for the first time?
9. What is the most complicated part of launching into space?
10. What are the safety measures implemented to protect the space station against possible space debris impacts?
11. Are the laws that govern the ISS like maritime laws or the laws of the country that owns the module?
12. What is day to day like on the ISS? Is there an established routine?
13. How do you manage the temperature in the space station?
14. What advice would you give to those who want to become astronauts?
15. How do you manage to navigate the ship so easily when all the modules appear uniform?
16. How does microgravity impact the effectiveness of the scientific experiments being carried out on the space station and what notable discoveries have emerged so far?
17. What are the best and worst aspects of your mission?
18. What was your motivation to be an astronaut? When was it clear?
19. What was the hardest part of your training?
20. What has been your most amazing moment in space?
___________________________

 

ARISS News Release                                                No. 24-09

ARISS Contact is Scheduled with Students at Lilburn Elementary School, Lilburn, Georgia, USA

February 6, 2024—Amateur Radio on the International Space Station (ARISS) has received schedule confirmation for an ARISS radio contact between an astronaut aboard the International Space Station (ISS) and students at the Lilburn Elementary School located in Lilburn, GA.  ARISS conducts 60-100 of these special amateur radio contacts each year between students around the globe and crew members with ham radio licenses aboard the ISS.

Lilburn is a K-5, Title I, public school serving nearly 1,350 students, ages 5-11 years. The school’s current curriculum includes relevant STEM and Computer Science topics across all grade levels and disciplines. In advance of this ARISS contact, students have also been learning more about Earth’s systems, robotics, and emergency communications. In STEM classes, students used the Design Thinking Process to solve real-world problems in space such as how people can one day live on the moon, designing solutions for the spidernaut experiment, as well as how to grow food in space. Computer science and STEM teachers that attended a Space Pioneers Amateur Radio Kit Initiative (SPARKI) workshop then showed students, using lessons and activities, how to communicate through radio. For example, fifth graders in STEM classes built a modified telegraph to communicate between classrooms using the telegraph key.  In the electricity unit, students used circuit kits (like the ones provided by SPARKI) and Makey-Makey kits to create simple circuits. The school is working with members of the Gwinnett American Radio Society (GARS), ARRL, and the North Fulton Amateur Radio League (NFARL). Members of these local ham radio organizations (NRARL) will help with the technical aspects of ham radio operation on the campus and with conducting the ARISS contact.

This will be a direct contact via Amateur Radio allowing students to ask their questions of astronaut Jasmin Moghbeli, amateur radio call sign KI5WSL. The downlink frequency for this contact is 145.800 MHz and may be heard by listeners that are within the ISS-footprint that also encompasses the relay ground station.

The amateur radio ground station for this contact is in Lilburn, GA. Amateur radio operators using call sign K4RGK, will operate the ground station to establish and maintain the ISS connection.

The ARISS radio contact is scheduled for February 7, 2024 at 9:24 am EST (GA, USA) (14:24 UTC, 8:24 am CST, 7:24 am MST, 6:24 am PST).

The public is invited to watch the live stream at:  http://www.youtube.com/channel/UCuI4sKDBpERtEFs9bFrRMFA/live
________________________

As time allows, students will ask these questions:

1. Our teachers help us focus not just on academics, but on emotional health as well. I would like to know, how are YOU doing?
2. What is the grossest thing about living in space?
3. Our school has many gardens that students help take care of. What kinds of plants are you growing on the ISS?
4. Have you ever had a big emergency in Space? If so, what was the situation?
5. What’s it like working with astronauts from other countries?
6. How long and how often do you have to wear the space suit, and do you get tired of it?
7. Have you read the Dog Man Books? If not, what kinds of books do you enjoy reading most?
8. What is something that surprised you that you didn’t expect about living in space?
9. What is your favorite hobby that is not space related?
10. What is the most important thing you have to do on the ISS when you wake up?
11. What are you looking forward to the most when you return to Earth?
12. How do you entertain yourself on the ISS?
13. How did your family react to the news that you would be going to the ISS?
14. Can you plant a flower in your area, or how do you personalize your area while you are living on the ISS to bring you joy?
15. Besides astronaut training with your space agency, how did you personally prepare for your journey to the ISS?
16. Can you see weather systems on Earth from space and if so, what have you observed?
17. How would kinetic sand behave in space?
18. What character traits do you think make a great astronaut?
19. What do you get tired of while being in space?
20. What is a typical day like on the ISS?
______________________________

ARISS News Release                                       No. 24-07

ARISS Contact is Scheduled with Students at Alabama School of Cyber Technology and Engineering (ASCTE), Huntsville, Alabama USA

January 30, 2024—Amateur Radio on the International Space Station (ARISS) has received schedule confirmation for an ARISS radio contact between an astronaut aboard the International Space Station (ISS) and students at the Alabama School of Cyber Technology and Engineering (ASCTE) in Huntsville, AL.  ARISS conducts 60 – 100 of these special amateur radio contacts each year between students around the globe and crew members with ham radio licenses aboard the ISS.

The ASCTE is a statewide, residential magnet high school that began operating in 2020 in its temporary home on the campus of Oakwood University, and since 2022 is now in its permanent home in the middle of Cummings Research Park in Huntsville. For the 2023-24 school year ASCTE has 334 enrolled with 112 students living on campus. In 2023, ASCTE signed a Memorandum of Understanding with Marshall Space Flight Center, creating a partnership with NASA.

The ASCTE Amateur Radio Club (N4CTE) was formed in the fall of 2022 and has thrived with generous support from the ARRL and assistance from the Huntsville Amateur Radio Club. Student interest in the school ham radio club led to offering an elective course in RF Engineering during the 2023-24 school year. Students in this class have been learning about radio communications and gaining hands-on experience with amateur radio equipment. Several departments (from science to the humanities to cybersecurity) have also incorporated space-related lessons in preparation for this ARISS contact. Members of the Huntsville Amateur Radio Club will be assisting ASCTE in the technical aspects of this ARISS contact and have been preparing the students for this contact.

This will be a direct contact via Amateur Radio allowing students to ask their questions of astronaut Jasmin Moghbeli, amateur radio call sign KI5WSL. The downlink frequency for this contact is 145.800 MHz and may be heard by listeners that are within the ISS-footprint that also encompasses the relay ground station.

The amaeur radio ground station for this contact is in Huntsville, AL. Amateur radio operators using call sign N4CTE, will operate the ground station to establish and maintain the ISS connection.

The ARISS radio contact is scheduled for February 1, 2024 at 11:34:50 am CST (Huntsville, AL) (17:34:50 UTC, 12:34 pm EST, 10:34 am MST, 9:34 am PST).
__________________
As time allows, students will ask these questions:

1. What do you and the others up there do for fun?
2. Are you worried about cyber vulnerabilities on the space station, and if you are, what plans are in place to counteract them?
3. How is the station protected from micro debris?
4. How if at all has 3D printing been used lately on the station?
5. What sparked your interest in becoming an astronaut and how old were you when you figured it out?
6. Did you go to college and pick a major with the intention of being an astronaut?
7. Have you ever broken anything on the ISS?
8. How is the ISS actually maneuvered?
9. What was your scariest experience as an astronaut?
10. Do you face any unique physiological changes after spending a lot of time in space?
11. What software tools like Excel and Matlab do you use?
12. What mental health support do you have on the station?
13. If you were to start over would you still choose to be an astronaut and if not what would you choose instead?
14. What kind of exercise do you do in space to stay fit?
15. What experiments or research projects are you currently working on in the unique microgravity environment of the space station?
16. Is solar power the only form of energy on the station?
17. What should I do if I want to become an astronaut?
18. If there is an emergency on the station what do you do first?
19. How do you manage daily activities like eating, sleeping, and exercising in the confined space of the space station, and how does it differ from life on Earth?
20. What does the ISS smell like?
_____________________

 

ARISS News Release                                       No. 24-06

ARISS Contact is Scheduled with Students at Bilingual Montessori School of Lund (Stiftelsen BMSL), Lund, Sweden

January 30, 2024—Amateur Radio on the International Space Station (ARISS) has received schedule confirmation for an ARISS radio contact between an Axiom Mission (Ax-3) astronaut aboard the International Space Station (ISS) and students at the Stiftelsen BMSL located in Lund, Sweden.  ARISS conducts 60 -100 of these special amateur radio contacts each year between students around the globe and crew members with ham radio licenses aboard the ISS.

BMSL was established in 2003 for children aged 1 to 16, using the National Swedish Curriculum. The school employs Montessori-inspired pedagogy and language immersion teaching English and French from preschool and starting in grade 6, teaching Spanish.

This will be a telebridge Contact via Amateur Radio allowing students to ask their questions of astronaut Marcus Wandt, amateur radio call sign KJ5COO. Wandt has over 20 years of aviation experience with the Swedish Air Force as a fighter pilot, squadron commander, wing commander, and chief test pilot. He will be the second ESA astronaut of Swedish nationality to ever go to the International Space Station and will serve as a mission specialist during Axiom Space’s Ax-3 mission.

Wandt is honored to have this opportunity to not only achieve one of his greatest life’s dreams, but also to use the Ax-3 mission to ignite a passion for STEM education in teachers and students worldwide to each pursue their ambitions. The downlink frequency for this contact is 145.800 MHz and may be heard by listeners that are within the ISS-footprint that also encompasses the telebridge station.

The ARISS amateur radio ground station (telebridge station) for this contact is in Glenden, Australia. The amateur radio volunteer team at the ground station will use the call sign VK4KHZ, to establish and maintain the ISS connection.

The ARISS radio contact is scheduled for January 31, 2024 at 1:50:25 pm CET(Sweden) (12:50:25 UTC, 7:50 am EST, 6:50 am CST, 5:50 am MST, 4:50 am PST).

The public is invited to watch the live stream at: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=G72VqFDlh0g
_________________________
As time allows, students will ask these questions:
Translation (from Swedish):

1. What does a typical day look like on the ISS?
2. How do you eat in space, and does the food taste different?
3. What kind of research are you conducting?
4. Which of your experiments can improve our lives on Earth?
5. How does it feel to be weightless, can it be compared to any other sensation?
6. What does the moon look like from the ISS?
7. Would you like to be the first human landing on Mars?
8. How do you poop in space?
9. How do you shower, Marcus? The water should be flying in all directions, right?
10. How does being in space affect your body?
11. How do you manage conflicts between crew members?
12. Do you think your values will change now that you have been in space?
13. What did you feel during the rocket liftoff?
14. Can you use your Smartphone with the Starlink satellites to contact your family from the ISS?
15. How did you prepare for weightlessness?
16. How can the fire stay on the rocket in space?
17. How does the cockpit of the Dragon module look like?
18. How do you know you won’t get lost in space?
19. Does life in space have effects on your body and your mood?
20. What does the education look like to become an astronaut?

Translation (English to Swedish for questions that will be asked in English):

3*. Class 8A (14-15): Vilken typ av forskning bedriver du?
4*. Class 9A (15-16): Vilka av dina experiment kan f rb ttra v rt liv p jorden?
7*. Class 8B (14-15): Skulle du vilja vara den f rsta m nniskan som landar p Mars?
11*. Class 9B (15-16): Hur hanterar du konflikter mellan bes ttningsmedlemmar?
14*. Class 7A (13:14): Kan du anv nda din smartphone med Startlink-satelliterna f r att kontakta din familj fr n ISS?
________________________________________

 

ARISS News Release                                       No. 24-05

ARISS Contact is Scheduled with Students at Bandırma Şehit Güvenç Anatolian High School, Balikesir, Bandırma, Türkiye

January 30, 2024—Amateur Radio on the International Space Station (ARISS) has received schedule confirmation for an ARISS radio contact between an Axiom Mission (Ax-3) astronaut aboard the International Space Station (ISS) and students at the Bandırma Şehit Güvenç Anatolian High School, Balikesir, Bandırma, Türkiye. ARISS conducts 60 – 100 of these special amateur radio contacts each year between students around the globe and crew members with ham radio licenses aboard the ISS.

This will be a telebridge Contact via Amateur Radio allowing students to ask their questions of astronaut Alper Gezeravci, amateur radio call sign KJ5DIY/TA5TRU. As a fighter pilot with the Turkish Air Force, Gezeravcı has 15 years of flying experience on multiple aircrafts including the T-41, SF-260, T-37, T-38, F-5, KC-135 and F-16. In addition, he served as a captain with the Turkish Airlines for seven years. Gezeravcı has also served as a flight leader, flight safety officer, and commercial airlines captain. He is now serving as a mission specialist for Axiom Space’s Ax-3 mission to the ISS on the SpaceX Dragon.

Born in Silifke, Türkiye, Gezeravci is honored to be a part of the Ax-3 mission as the first Turkish astronaut to go to space. Through the Ax-3 mission, Gezeravcı hopes to inspire the next generation of explorers and ignite a passion for STEM education in teachers and students worldwide to each pursue their ambitions. The downlink frequency for this contact is 145.800 MHz and may be heard by listeners that are within the ISS-footprint that also encompasses the telebridge station.

The ARISS amateur radio ground station (telebridge station) for this contact is in Casale Monferrato, Italy. The amateur radio volunteer team at the ground station will use the call sign, IK1SLD to establish and maintain the ISS connection.

The ARISS radio contact is scheduled for January 31, 2024 at 15:12:57 pm EEST (Turkey) (12:12:57 UTC, 7:12 am EST, 6:12 am CST, 5:12 am MST, 4:12 PST).

The public is invited to watch the live stream at: http://www.ariotti.com/
_________________________
As time allows, students will ask these questions:

1. How does it feel to be in space?
2. Could you provide us with some information about the International Space Station? What kind of place is it?
3. Where will you land after the mission?
4. What kind of experiments are you conducting on the International Space Station?
5. What contributions have or will the experiments you conduct on the International Space Station make to us?
6. Will you share some photos with us from space? Were you able to record some videos there?
7. How does being Türkiye’s first astronaut make you feel? Do you feel privileged?
8. As an astronaut with a background with fighter pilot, what were the most challenging and comfortable aspects of being an astronaut in the microgravity when compared to being a fighter pilot?
9. What is it like to watch the Earth from space?
10. What is the first thing you want to do after returning to Earth?
11. What did you feel from the moment you were strapped into the seat during the launch process?
12. How much G-force did you experience during launch? How did it affect you?
13. Can you tell us a bit about the experiments you are conducting on the International Space Station? What are the results of these experiments, and where and how will they be used?
14. What kind of infrastructure do you use when conducting experiments?
15. During experiments, do you have the opportunity to establish contact with Earth and receive support?
16. What is it like to sleep in microgravity? Do you have a private room on the International Space Station?
17. What is the most important characteristic in an astronaut that has caught your attention? Can anyone become an astronaut?
18. What kind of foods do you eat in International Space Station?
19. Do you have any activity with other astronauts to have some fun?
20. Would you like to stay in International Space Station more than 14 days?
_______________________________

ARISS News Release                                       No. 24-04

ARISS Contact is Scheduled with Students at Ömer Cemile Güler Imam Hatip Secondary School, Selçuklu, Konya, Turkey

January 29, 2024—Amateur Radio on the International Space Station (ARISS) has received schedule confirmation for an ARISS radio contact between an Axiom Mission (Ax-3) astronaut aboard the International Space Station (ISS) and students at Ömer Cemile Güler Imam Hatip Secondary School, Konya, Selçuklu, Türkiye.  ARISS conducts 60 – 100 of these special amateur radio contacts each year between students around the globe and crew members with ham radio licenses aboard the ISS.

This will be a telebridge contact via Amateur Radio allowing students to ask their questions of astronaut Alper Gezeravci, amateur radio call sign KJ5DIY/TA5TRU. As a fighter pilot with the Turkish Air Force, Gezeravcı has 15 years of flying experience on multiple aircrafts including the T-41, SF-260, T-37, T-38, F-5, KC-135 and F-16. In addition, he served as a captain with the Turkish Airlines for seven years. Gezeravcı has also served as a flight leader, flight safety officer, and commercial airlines captain. He is now serving as a mission specialist for Axiom Space’s Ax-3 mission to the ISS on the SpaceX Dragon.

Born in Silifke, Türkiye, Gezeravci is honored to be a part of the Ax-3 mission as the first Turkish astronaut to go to space. Through the Ax-3 mission, Gezeravcı hopes to inspire the next generation of explorers and ignite a passion for STEM education in teachers and students worldwide to each pursue their ambitions. The downlink frequency for this contact is 145.800 MHz and may be heard by listeners that are within the ISS-footprint that also encompasses the telebridge station.

The ARISS amateur radio ground station (telebridge station) for this contact is in Glenden, Australia. The amateur radio volunteer team at the ground station will use the call sign VK4KHZ, to establish and maintain the ISS connection.

The ARISS radio contact is scheduled for January 30, 2024 at 16:38:20 pm EEST (Turkey) (13:38:20 UTC, 8:38 am EST, 7:38 am CST, 6:38 am MST, 5:38 am PST)
____________________________

As time allows, students will ask these questions:

  1. How does it feel to look to the International Space Station from the Dragon spacecraft while approaching to dock?
  2. Are you going to have some adaptation period after landing to Earth since you are exposed to microgravity for 14 days in International Space Station?
  3. Besides yourself, which countries’ astronauts are currently active on the International Space Station? Can you communicate with them?
  4. What is the meal you miss the most while you’re there?
  5. How is life on the International Space Station, and how do your days pass? What do you do to spend your time?
  6. Although it hasn’t been a very long time, you are now farther from Earth than ever before. What is the thing you missed the most there?
  7. When you look from the windows, do you see any other satellite?
  8. Were you able to see Moon from the International Space Station?
  9. How is the air condition in ISS? Is it cold or hot?
  10. How was the docking process to the International Space Station? Were you excited?
  11. Which experiment did you enjoy most?
  12. How much time do you sleep?
  13. Do you wish to be back to International Space Station one more time?
  14. What kind of benefits the experiments that you made there provide us?
  15. What kind of foods do you eat in International Space Station?
  16. How does it feel to look Earth from Space?
  17. Would you like to set foot in another planet on the universe as an astronaut?
  18. What was the most challenging part of the mission until docking?
  19. Do you feel the high orbital speed of International Space Station which is approximately 7 km/s?
  20. Have you ever looked to the Türkiye from ISS? If yes, how does it feel?
    ________________________________

 

ARISS News Release                                       No. 24-03

ARISS Contact is Scheduled with Students at Istituto Comprensivo “Anna Rita Sidoti”, GioiosaMarea, Italy

January 22, 2024—Amateur Radio on the International Space Station (ARISS) has received schedule confirmation for an ARISS radio contact between an Axiom Mission (Ax-3) astronaut aboard the International Space Station (ISS) and students at the Anna Rita Sidoti Institute located in Gioiosa Marea, Italy.  ARISS conducts 60 -100 of these special amateur radio contacts each year between students around the globe and crew members with ham radio licenses aboard the ISS.

The Gioiosa Marea’s Institute “Anna Rita Sidoti”, serves about 730 students in three school levels; nursery, primary and lower secondary. The school will engage all students in preparation for this ARISS contact and is supported by local radio amateur members of the Italian Radioamateur Associaion (ARI) who will provide practical and technical support for the event.

This will be a direct contact via Amateur Radio allowing students to ask their questions of astronaut Walter Villadei, amateur radio call sign IUØRWB. Villadei is a colonel in the Italian Air Force (ItAF), and the pilot for Axiom Space’s Ax-3 mission to the ISS on the SpaceX Dragon. Villadei currently lives in Rome, Italy, and is honored to have this opportunity to not only achieve one of his greatest life’s dreams, but also to use the Ax-3 mission to ignite a passion for STEM education in teachers and students worldwide to each pursue their ambitions.  The downlink frequency for this contact is 145.800 MHz and may be heard by listeners that are within the ISS-footprint that also encompasses the relay ground station.

The amateur radio ground station for this contact is in Gioiosa Marea, Italy. The amateur radio volunteer team at the ground station will use the callsign IT9DBI, to establish and maintain the ISS connection.

The ARISS radio contact is scheduled for January 24, 2024 at 3:37:22 pm CET (Italy) (14:37:22 UTC, 9:37 am EST, 8:37 am CST, 7:37 am MST, 6:37 am PST).

The public is invited to watch the live stream at: https://www.icgioiosa.edu.it/2-uncategorised/1604-axiom-social-news-eventi-comunicati
______________________________
As time allows, students will ask these questions: (English Translation)
1. At what age did your passion for space begin?
2. In space can you surf the internet and use social media?
3. Can you cook hot food in the space or do you eat cold food from the refrigerator?
4. Which of an astronaut’s five senses is most affected by microgravity?
5. How and how much do you sleep in space?
6. How did you feel before leaving on a mission?
7. Have you ever seen unidentified objects outside the spacecraft?
8. How do you take care of your daily hygiene?
9. How did you prepare before leaving for space?
10. Do you ever get bored?
11. Do you experience good or bad sensations in a state of microgravity? Is it annoying to be in a state of microgravity after a while?
12. During this mission what type of research will you carry out?
13. How do you contact family members from space?
14. How do you use the toilets in Space?
15. What is the thing you miss most about the Earth?
16. What do you do in your free time on the space station?
17. Do any of you write a logbook?
18. How is time perceived in space?
19. Even though you have chosen to go on a space mission, and even though you have been physically and psychologically prepared, do you ever feel afraid?
20. Do you astronauts always float inside the space station, or is there a room with Earth’s gravity on board?
_________________________

 

ARISS News Release                                       No. 24-02

ARISS Contact is Scheduled with Students at Istituto Comprensivo di Villa Guardia, Villa Guardia, Italy

January 20, 2024—Amateur Radio on the International Space Station (ARISS) has received schedule confirmation for an ARISS radio contact between an Axiom Mission (Ax-3) astronaut aboard the International Space Station (ISS) and students at the IC di Villa Guardia located in Villa Guardia, Italy.  ARISS conducts 60-80 of these special amateur radio contacts each year between students around the globe and crew members with ham radio licenses aboard the ISS.

Istituto Comprensivo di Villa Guardia consists of three primary schools (with students aged 6 to 10) and two middle schools (students aged 11 to 13) and is located in Villa Guardia, near the city of Como, in northern Italy. The school’s STEM curriculum includes two hours of science, two hours of technology every week and employs a team of teachers providing both theoretical and practical teaching with scientific and technological experiences.

This will be a telebridge Contact via Amateur Radio allowing students to ask their questions of astronaut Walter Villadei, amateur radio call sign IUØRWB. Villadei is a colonel in the Italian Air Force (ItAF), and the pilot for Axiom Space’s Ax-3 mission to the ISS on the SpaceX Dragon. Villadei currently lives in Rome, Italy, and is honored to have this opportunity to not only achieve one of his greatest life’s dreams but also to use the Ax-3 mission to ignite a passion for STEM education in teachers and students worldwide to each pursue their ambitions.  The downlink frequency for this contact is 145.800 MHz and may be heard by listeners that are within the ISS-footprint that also encompasses the telebridge station.

The ARISS amateur radio ground station (telebridge station) for this contact is in Paardekraal, South Africa. The amateur radio volunteer team at the ground station will use the callsign ZS6JON, to establish and maintain the ISS connection.

The ARISS radio contact is scheduled for January 22, 2024 at 10:35:49 am CET (Italy) (9:35:49 UTC, 4:35 am EST, 3:35 am CST, 2:35 am MST, 1:35 am PST).

The public is invited to watch the live stream at https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gMQUWMww9yE
_____________________________
As time allows, students will ask these questions: (Translation)
1. How does an astronaut prepare himself to face a mission?
2. What kind of emotion did you feel at the first launch?
3. During your training, did you get new habits, that you still use in normal life?
4. Why did you choose to do this job?
5. How long have you studied to become an astronaut?
6. What do you like about this job?
7. What is your work goal?
8. What does the Earth look like from up there?
9. What’s the most fascinating thing you have ever seen in space?
10. Have you ever heard strange noises coming from Space?
11. Are there any particular images of space seen from the ISS that you want to describe us?
12. Have you ever seen a comet from the ISS?
13. How is floating in microgravity?
14. Are the 5 senses perceived in space as they are on Earth?
15. What time do you set on the watch on the ISS, not being able to rely on sunrise and sunset?
16. How will you feel when you set foot on Earth again?
17. How long does rehabilitation take (once you return to Earth)?
18. What does it mean to you to represent humanity in space?
19. Could it be good for humans to bring a pet in space?
20. When you come back to Earth, how is feeling gravity again?
______________________________