As of August 3, 2021

  • Notre Dame Jogakuin Junior and Senior High School, Kyoto, Japan, direct via 8N3ND (Thomas Pesquet KG5FYG)
  • 1st Ono Group Hyogo Council Scout Assoc. of Japan, Ono, Japan, direct via 8J3ONO (Shane Kimbrough KE5HOD)
    • Wed 2021-08-11 08:05:06 UTC 82 deg

ARISS News Release                                                                            No.   21-44

ARISS Contact is Scheduled for Students at Notre Dame Jogakuin Junior and Senior High School, Kyoto, Japan

August 1, 2021—Amateur Radio on the International Space Station (ARISS) has received schedule confirmation for an ARISS radio contact with astronauts. ARISS is the group that puts together special amateur radio contacts between students around the globe and crew members with ham radio licenses on the International Space Station (ISS).

This will be a direct contact via amateur radio between students at the Notre Dame Jogakuin Junior and Senior High School, and Astronaut Thomas Pesquet, amateur radio call sign KG5FYG. Students will take turns asking their questions. English is the language that will be used for this contact. Onsite access will be provided to the student body at the time of the contact, and will be following Covid-19 guidelines. The downlink frequency for this contact is 145.800 MHZ and may be heard by listeners that are within the ISS-footprint that also encompasses the radio relay ground station.

Amateur radio operators, using the 8N3ND call sign, will operate the ham radio ground station for this contact.

The ARISS radio contact is scheduled for August 3, 2021 at 8:10 pm JST (Kyoto, Japan), (11:10 UTC, 7:10 am EDT, 6:10 am CDT, 5:10 am MDT and 4:10 am PDT).

Notre Dame Jogakuin Junior and Senior High School was established for women in 1952. The school’s programs leading up to this contact have incorporated studies of amateur radio, the ISS, living in space, space exploration, and earth sciences. Other student activities involved experiments in electronics related to space, space food, and learning about the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency. To publicize the ARISS contact to other youth, students provided illustrations for an information booth during the Tachibana school festival.

The public is invited to watch the live stream at: https://youtu.be/4uL-kHi1Bsw
______________________________

As time allows, students will ask these questions (Translation):

  1. When did you decide to become an astronaut?
  2. Was your mission impacted by COVID-19 restrictions? What measures were taken to stay safe and healthy?
  3. How many pieces of luggage can you usually bring from the earth? Also, what did you bring this time?
  4. How do you move from a spacecraft or rocket to the ISS?
  5. What is the best thing about being in space?
  6. What was the most dangerous thing you experienced?
  7. What do you do if you get ill?
  8. What do you want to do after you come back to earth??
  9. How did you learn English?
  10. How do you maintain levels of oxygen and carbon dioxide in the ISS?
  11. What made you want to become an astronaut?
  12. What did you think when you first experienced weightlessness?
  13. At what altitude are you flying?
    ___________________

ARISS News Release No. 21-43

ARISS Contact is Scheduled for Students at Seinan Gakuin Junior Senior High School, Fukuoka, Japan

July 20, 2021—Amateur Radio on the International Space Station (ARISS) has received schedule confirmation for an ARISS radio contact with astronauts. ARISS is the group that puts together special amateur radio contacts between students around the globe and crew members with ham radio licenses on the International Space Station (ISS).

This will be a direct contact via amateur radio between students at the Seinan Gakuin Junior Senior High School, Fukuoka and Astronaut Akihiko Hoshide, amateur radio call sign KE5DNI. Students will take turns asking their questions. Japanese is the language expected to be used during the contact, however students want to communicate in English, therefore they request that replies be in English when possible. Onsite access will be provided to the student body at the time of the contact, and following Covid-19 guidelines. The downlink frequency for this contact is 145.800 MHZ and may be heard by listeners that are within the ISS-footprint that also encompasses the radio relay ground station.

Onsite access will be provided to the student body at the time of the contact, and following Covid-19 guidelines.

Amateur radio operators, using the 8N6SW call sign will operate the ham radio ground station for this contact.

The ARISS radio contact is scheduled for July 22, 2021 at 6:14 pm JST (Fukuoka, Japan), (09:14 UTC, 5:14 am EDT, 4:14 am CDT, 3:14 am MDT and 2:14 am PDT).

Seinan Gakuin Junior Senior High School is a private, six-year coeducational school and is among the oldest private schools in the Fukuoka area. In 2003 the school moved to the new campus in the Momochihama area of Fukuoka. The school events that are tied into the ARISS contact include satellite operations, space research, and ham radio’s historical function. The school’s ham radio club will be participating/supporting this contact.

The public is invited to watch the live stream at: https://nasatosw.space/
____________________________________________

As time allows, students will ask these questions:

  1. What is the best space food that you have ever had?
  2. Do you have any personal routines that you do before you do something important?
  3. Can you prove that you are actually in space and not just in some NASA base?
  4. What made you want to become an astronaut?
  5. What do you think when you see Japan from space?
  6. What are the most amazing natural phenomena that you have ever seen from space?
  7. Is there anything in the universe that cannot be seen from earth?
  8. What would be the biggest challenge if people decide to move to Mars?
  9. What is the most inconvenient thing about living in space?
  10. You have been on several missions to space. On your first trip, what was the hardest part about coming back to earth?
  11. What was the hardest part of your training and tests on earth?
  12. What does the aurora borealis look like from space?
  13. Many different countries and companies are trying their best to explore space, but I don’t think they should compete with each other. Instead, we need to unite together, because we are all human beings; we are all on one team. Mr. Hoshide, what do you think about it?
  14. As the captain of the ISS, what do you think is the most important part of your job?
  15. I want to major in “space engineering” at university. So, could you please tell me what kinds of. technology you would want to be developed in the future.

ARISS News Release                                                                            No. 21-42

ARISS Contact is Scheduled with Students at SpaceKids Global/Girl Scouts of Citrus, Winter Park, Florida, United States

July 19, 2021—Amateur Radio on the International Space Station (ARISS) has received schedule confirmation for an ARISS radio contact with astronauts. ARISS is the group that puts together special amateur radio contacts between students around the globe and crew members with ham radio licenses on the International Space Station (ISS).

This will be a Multipoint Telebridge Contact via Amateur Radio between the ISS and students from SpaceKids Global in Winter Park, FL, along with Girl Scouts working with Girl Scouts of Citrus. Students will take turns asking their questions of ISS Astronaut Mark Vande Hei, amateur radio call sign KG5GNP, during the ARISS radio contact. English is the language expected to be used during the contact. The downlink frequency for this contact is 145.800 MHZ and may be heard by listeners within the ISS footprint that encompasses the ARISS radio telebridge ground station.

The ARISS team in Casale Monferrato, Italy will use call sign IK1SLD to serve as the ARISS relay amateur radio ground station. Each student asking a question on the ARISS radio will be conferenced in from home or while being social-distanced at their facility.

The ARISS radio contact is scheduled for July 21, 2021 at 1:47 pm EDT (Winter Park, FL) (17:47 UTC, 12:47 pm CDT, 11:47 am MDT, 10:47 am PDT).

SpaceKids Global partnered with Girl Scouts of Citrus Council to create the Making Space for Girls Program. This is a year-long STEAM-enrichment program for girls in grades K-12, teaches them about space exploration and communications and other various topics, with the intent of inspiring them to pursue STEAM careers. SpaceKids Global is hosting the ARISS contact in conjunction with this Program that provides virtual activities reaching over 600 students from 89 Girl Scout councils across 46 different states and countries. The curriculum aligns with the steps for Girl Scout badge requirements. During the weeks leading up to this ARISS contact, the Program included virtual activities about space technology, and amateur radio operations as well as hands-on activities revolving around electronics and technology.  The Program also invited guest speakers in the fields of space exploration and space technologies, and included virtual courses in Space Science 101 and Humans in Space. The Program also launched online (summer of 2020) the Making Space for Girls STEAM Challenge and, as a result, hundreds of girls submitted their experiments, art design, or space-themed essay to the ISS. In collaboration with Challenge partner, ProXops, selected projects and items will launch in a Faraday Box to the ISS on a SpaceX flight in the Fall of 2021.

View the live stream of the upcoming ARISS radio contact at https://youtu.be/KzSRnjSjiTw.
______________________________________________
As time allows, students will ask these questions:

  1. What is your favorite outer space food? Do you have lots of different things to eat?
  2. In Girl Scouts, we are taught to use resources wisely. How could this concept be applied to NASA and the space industry?
  3. What do you do for fun on the ISS?
  4. What is your favorite piece of experiment/research that you have worked on in space?
  5. What does it feel like in space?
  6. Do astronauts get sick when they’re in space and how would they handle it if so?
  7. What would happen if you brought a compass to outer space with you?
  8. How high can you jump on the moon?
  9. What is Oobleck like in space? Would it act the same as on Earth? Would it firm up when hit or thrown or would it stay all oozy?
  10. How would you describe weightlessness?
  11. Do you have any live animals on the International Space Station?
  12. What kinds of food have you been able to grow in space so far?
  13. What math did you take and use on the International Space Station?
  14. Would you be excited to meet an alien while you were in space and what would you want them to know about Earth?
  15. Which is more fun- the ride to the ISS or the trip home? What does it feel like?
  16. What training did you have to do before you went to the space station?
  17. What is your favorite Girl Scout cookie?
  18. What are some challenges that you have to face trying to readjust back to your normal life after being in space?
  19. Do you take social media photos or videos in space and how do you post them?
  20. When was a time that you had failed at something in your journey in becoming an astronaut, why did you decide to keep pushing through?
  21. What are some major hurdles to make it to Mars?
  22. Does an astronaut’s height increase in space and come back to normal after returning to Earth?
  23. What is your advice to a female that is looking to get into the space industry?

ARISS News Release                                                                          No.   21-41

ARISS Contact Scheduled for Students at Youth on The Air Camp (YOTA) 2021
West Chester, OH, USA

July 12, 2021—Amateur Radio on the International Space Station (ARISS) has received schedule confirmation for an ARISS radio contact with astronauts. ARISS is the group that puts together special amateur radio contacts between students around the globe and crew members with ham radio licenses on the International Space Station (ISS).

This will be a telebridge contact via amateur radio and students will take turns asking their questions of Akihiko Hoshide, amateur radio call sign KE5DNI. English is the language that will be used during this contact.  Both onsite and remote access will be provided to the student body at the time of the contact per Covid-19 guidelines. The downlink frequency for this contact is 145.800 MHZ and may be heard by listeners that are within the ISS-footprint that also encompasses the telebridge station.

ARISS team member John Sygo in Paardekraal, South Africa, call sign ZS6JON will serve as the relay amateur radio station.

The ARISS radio contact is scheduled for July 14, 2021 at 11:03 am EDT(West Chester, OH), (15:03 UTC, 10:03 am CDT, 9:03 am MDT and 8:03 am PDT).

Youth on the Air 2021 (YOTA) is a week-long camp (July 11-16) for ham radio operators ages 15-25 from across North, Central, and South America, and is held at the Voice of America Museum in West Chester, OH. The VOA Museum and the West Chester Amateur Radio Club (WC8VOA) is partnering with this YOTA Region 2 Camp event. They will provide ham radio educational activities for camp participants and support the ARISS contact. This camp event is designed to help licensed students to take ham radio to the next level by providing them with unique experiences and technologies, and the opportunity to meet other young hams. The camp staff is a collection of experienced ham volunteers from across the Americas. Young hams that are staff and some that are volunteers from local amateur radio clubs will lead activities. These include: kit building, antenna building, transmitter hunting and direction finding, digital modes, and a high-altitude balloon launch.  Amateur satellite operation is one of the workshops provided; others included effective radio communications, local history of ham radio, and using amateur radio during emergencies. This ARISS contact is intended to inspire these young hams to learn more about communication using amateur satellites and making ARISS radio contacts.

The public is invited to watch the live stream at: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC1LVWge18cxFh0SnHemQ2zQ
___________________________

As time allows, students will ask these questions:

  1. Who are your greatest role models and mentors and why?
  2. What is the most interesting thing you have seen from space?
  3. What was the biggest challenge you faced in becoming an astronaut, and how did you overcome it?
  4. How often do you or other astronauts man the ISS simplex radio?
  5. What are you doing now on the space station that will help future missions to the Moon and Mars conduct their experiments safely?
  6. What is the hardest aspect of space travel that training cannot prepare you for?
  7. What are your specific role(s) on the ISS?
  8. What is your favorite thing to do in space that can’t be done on earth?
  9. What does a typical day look like?
  10. What is the most rewarding part about living and working on the ISS?
  11. What new space related technology are you most excited for?
  12. When did you first learn about ham radio?
  13. How are breaches or leaks in the station detected and what are the necessary steps to contain them?
  14. How often do you launch smaller spacecraft into orbit on the space station?
  15. Are there many issues for you to fix on a day-to-day basis?
    _____________________________________________

ARISS News Release                                                                          No. 21-40

ARISS Contact is Scheduled with Students in France at Ecole publique de Bellême in Bellême, Pôle scolaire Igé/Le Gué de la Chaine in Belforêt en Perche, and Ecole de Nocé in Perche en Nocé

June 24, 2021—Amateur Radio on the International Space Station (ARISS) has received schedule confirmation for an ARISS radio contact with astronauts. ARISS is the group that puts together special amateur radio contacts between students around the globe and crew members with ham radio licenses on the International Space Station (ISS).

This will be a Multipoint Telebridge Contact via Amateur Radio between the ISS and students from three schools in France. Students will take turns asking their questions of ISS Astronaut Thomas Pesquet, amateur radio call sign KG5FYG, during the ARISS radio contact. French is the language expected to be used during the contact. The downlink frequency for this contact is 437.525 MHZ and may be heard by listeners that are within the ISS-footprint that also encompasses the ARISS radio telebridge station.

The ARISS team in Casale Monferrato, Italy will use call sign IK1SLD to serve as the ARISS relay amateur radio ground station. Each student asking a question on the ARISS radio will be conferenced in from home or social-distanced at school.

The ARISS radio contact is scheduled for June 26, 2021 at 11:25 am CEST (Bellême, France) (9:25 am UTC, 5:25 am EDT, 4:25 am CDT, 3:25 am MDT, 2:25 am PDT).

Three schools in France will participate in this ARISS contact: Ecole de Nocé, Pôle scolaire Igé/Le Gué de la Chaine and Ecole publique de Bellême. These are rural schools about 90 miles west of Paris and will involve about 360 students, age 6 – 15 years old. The schools have partnered with the amateur radio club (callsign F4KLQ) in preparation for this contact. Student-members of the ham club receive training from the adult members who have knowledge in the fields of radio, aeronautical, and the space sciences. Ham radio workshops include the topics: Orne Sky Sat, the Yaourtocom 2000, SSTV, Morse code, radio communication, and radio directional finding.

Starting about 15 minutes before AOS, watch livestream atwww.ariotti.com
________________________________________

As time allows, students will ask these questions:

  1. Que faites-vous comme expérience en ce moment?
  2. Quand vous étiez dans l’ISS lors de votre première mission, vous êtes-vous dit que vous y retourneriez un jour?
  3. Comment se passe un ravitaillement?
  4. Comment vit-on loin de sa famille?
  5. Comment avez-vous réagi lorsque vous avez appris que vous retourniez dans l’ISS pour la deuxième fois?
  6. Quelle place y a-t-il pour l’écologie lorsque l’on part dans l’espace?
  7. Qu’aimez-vous le plus dans le fait d’aller dans l’espace?
  8. Votre préparation a-t-elle été différente pour cette deuxième mission?
  9. Est-ce que c’est d’avoir parlé à un astronaute lorsque vous étiez petit qui vous a donné envie de devenir astronaute à votre tour?
  10. Combien de temps mettez-vous à vous habituer à l’impesanteur?
  11. Dans l’ISS, avez-vous déjà ressenti le besoin de redescendre sur Terre?
  12. Avez-vous déjà croisé des astéroïdes et comment les éviter?
  13. Accepteriez-vous de donner votre nom à notre école?
  14. Lorsque vous êtes dans l’ISS, qu’est-ce qui vous manque le plus?
  15. Est-ce que l’impesanteur est dangereux pour le corps si on y reste trop longtemps?
  16. Avez-vous déjà été en danger pendant une de vos missions?
  17. Qu’est-ce qui est le plus difficile à vivre dans l’ISS?
  18. Relèverez-vous le défi de jouer aux dés lors de cette mission?

Translation:

  1. What experiments are you working on currently?
  2. When you were in the ISS on your first mission, did you think you would ever go back there?
  3. What is refueling about? How does it work?
  4. How is it to live away from your family?
  5. What was your reaction when you were told you were returning to the ISS?
  6. Is ecology something you take into account when you go into space?
  7. What do you like the most about going in space?
  8. Was the preparation different for this second mission?
  9. Did talking to an astronaut when you were young inspire you to become an astronaut yourself?
  10. How many times do you take to get used to the zero gravity / weightlessness?
  11. In the ISS, have you ever felt the need to come back down to Earth?
  12. Did you ever come across asteroids and what would you do to avoid them?
  13. Would you agree to give your name to our school?
  14. What do you miss most when you’re in the ISS?
  15. Does weightlessness impact your body in a dangerous way if you stay in this condition for too long?
  16. Have you ever been in danger during a mission?
  17. What’s the hardest thing to live with in the ISS?
  18. Will you accept the challenge of playing dice while you’re on this mission?
    _____________________________

ARISS News Release                                                                          No. 21-39

ARISS Contact is Scheduled with Students in France at
Collège Albert Camus in La Norville and Université Paris-Saclay in Saint-Aubin

June 15, 2021—Amateur Radio on the International Space Station (ARISS) has received schedule confirmation for an ARISS radio contact with astronauts. ARISS is the group that puts together special amateur radio contacts between students around the globe and crew members with ham radio licenses on the International Space Station (ISS).

This will be a Multipoint Telebridge Contact via Amateur Radio between the ISS and students from these two schools. Students will take turns asking their questions of ISS Astronaut Thomas Pesquet, amateur radio call sign KG5FYG. French is the language expected to be used during the contact. The downlink frequency for this contact is 145.800 MHZ and may be heard by listeners who are within the ISS-footprint that also encompasses the ARISS radio telebridge station.

ARISS team member Jan Poppeliers in Aartselaar, Belgium using radio call sign ON4ISS, will serve as the ARISS relay amateur radio station. Each student asking a question on the ARISS radio will be conferenced in from home or social-distanced at school.

The ARISS radio contact is scheduled for June 17, 2021 at 1:40 pm CEST (La Norville, France) (11:40 UTC, 7:40 am EDT, 6:40 am CDT, 5:40 am MDT, 4:40 am PDT).

Course preparations and learning activities prior to this ARISS contact have been a combined effort between two schools: Collège Albert Camus (Middle School) and Université Paris-Saclay; and members of the amateur radio club of Viry-Châtillon (F5KEE).

Collège Albert Camus (about 300 students ages 11-15) is in La Norville in a rural area, about 40 km south of Paris.  The school provides students a classical STEM French curriculum with additional courses/activities focused on space-related sciences.

Université Paris-Saclay, in the Orsay/Gif/Saclay area offers Bachelor, Master and Doctorate programs, including mathematics, physics, medicine, and agriculture. The University internal colleges offer programs in science and engineering, life sciences and health, social sciences and humanities. Its 275 labs shared with CEA, CNRS, ONERA (French research labs) involve 48,000 students, 9,000 teachers and teacher-researchers, and 11,000 technical and administrative staff.

Members of the amateur radio club of Viry-Châtillon offer students instruction on radio communication—activities/workshops on radio theory/practice, intro to Morse code, antenna-building, fox-hunting, radio receiver building, and amateur radio regulations. The club will support the school during the contact.

View the live stream of the upcoming ARISS radio contact at https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=04k4RGNxlgU&list=TLPQMTUwNjIwMjGIS3GJchfc6g&index=2
__________________________________
As time allows, students will ask these questions:

  1. Avez-vous ressenti au second décollage les mêmes émotions qu’au premier?
  2. A votre retour dans l’ISS avez-vous retrouvé vos réflexes?
  3. Qu’est-ce que vous trouvez compliqué en apesanteur?
  4. Quelle est l’influence de l’apesanteur sur les 5 sens?
  5. Dans l’Espace rêve-t-on qu’on est en apesanteur?
  6. Quelles sortes d’expériences réalisez-vous dans l’ISS?
  7. Quelles responsabilités aurez-vous en tant que commandant de bord?
  8. Qu’est ce qui est le plus important pour vous derrière le nom de votre mission ALPHA?
  9. Faites-vous des choses différemment lors de votre 2eme mission?
  10. Quand on est en sortie extra véhiculaire, est-ce qu’on pense à l’Espace autour de soi?
  11. Appréciez-vous de la même manière les plats de Thierry Marx et Raphaël Haumont qui ont été préparés pour vous dans l’Espace?
  12. Qu’est-ce qui vous émerveille le plus dans l’Espace?
  13. Quel principal conseil pouvez-vous donner à la future sélection des astronautes?
  14. Quelle influence espérez-vous avoir sur la jeunesse?
  15. Vu de l’espace, qu’observez-vous de la présence de l’Homme et de ses dégâts?
  16. Pensez-vous que l’on pourra trouver les moyens d’une alimentation durable lors d’un long voyage spatial, par exemple avec des micro-algues?
  17. En quoi votre expérience sur l’ISS permet de préparer les prochaines missions vers Mars?
  18. Quelles compétences de votre formation vous sont utiles aujourd’hui pour commander cette mission?
  19. Comment gérez-vous psychologiquement la présence du vide?

Translation:

  1. Did you feel the same emotions on the second launch as you did on the first one?
  2. When you returned to the ISS, did you get back into your old habits?
  3. What do you find complicated in zero gravity?
  4. What is the influence of weightlessness onto the five senses?
  5. In space, do we dream that we are weightless?
  6. What kind of experiments do you perform on the ISS?
  7. What responsibilities will you have as the ISS captain?
  8. What is the most important thing for you behind the name of the mission ALPHA?
  9. Are you doing things any differently on your second mission?
  10. When you’re on an EVA, do you think about the space all around you?
  11. Do you enjoy Thierry Marx’s and Raphaël Haumont’s dishes as much in space as you do on the ground?
  12. What amazes you most about Space?
  13. What advice would you give to the future selection of astronauts?
  14. What influence do you hope to have on the younger generation?
  15. As seen from space, what can you make of the presence of humankind and its damage?
  16. Do you think we will be able to find a type of sustainable food which could be grown or cultivated during a long space trip, such as micro-algae?
  17. How does your experience on the ISS help prepare for future crewed missions to Mars?
  18. What skills acquired through your educational background and training are useful to you today to command this mission?
  19. How do you psychologically deal with the presence of emptiness of space?
    ___________________

ARISS News Release                                                                                No.   21-38 

ARISS Contact Scheduled for Students at St Joseph’s Catholic Primary School, Bombala, New South Wales, Australia

June 8, 2021—Amateur Radio on the International Space Station (ARISS) has received schedule confirmation for an ARISS radio contact with astronauts. ARISS is the group that puts together special amateur radio contacts between students around the globe and crew members with ham radio licenses on the International Space Station (ISS).

This will be a telebridge contact via amateur radio and students will take turns asking their questions of Astronaut Shane Kimbrough, amateur radio call sign KE5HOD. English is the language that will be used during this contact.  Both onsite and remote access will be provided to the student body at the time of the contact per Covid-19 guidelines. The downlink frequency for this contact is 437.525 MHZ and may be heard by listeners that are within the ISS-footprint that also encompasses the telebridge station.

The ARISS team in Casale Monferrato, Italy will use call sign IK1SLD to serve as the ARISS relay amateur radio ground station.

The ARISS radio contact is scheduled for June 10, 2021 at 8:45 pm AEST (Bombala, NSW, Australia), (10:45 UTC, 6:45 am EDT, 5:45 am CDT, 4:45 am MDT and 3:45 am PDT).

St. Joseph’s Catholic Primary School is a rural school (Kindergarten to Year 6, with 62 students enrolled) located between the Snowy Mountains and the Far South Coast, in the southern tablelands of NSW Australia. The school has a focus on developing student interest in science, technology, engineering and mathematics. Student activities include an introduction to coding, robotics, virtual reality and 3D printing. Students will also learn about the Universe by participating in a field trip to the Canberra Deep Space Communication Centre.
_________________________________________________
As time allows, students will ask these questions:

  1. What is the process for getting up and down from the International Space Station?
  2. Does zero gravity up there affect the way you are when you come back down to earth?
  3. How long have you all been on the space station for?
  4. What do the shooting stars look like when they go past your space station?
  5. How does a satellite provide internet?
  6. What made you want to be an astronaut?
  7. How do you keep warm?
  8. How long has the space station been around for/ when was it built and who by?
  9. Does outside in space always look the same?
  10. Have you seen any space junk?
  11. Thank you for answering our questions, to finish up we would like to know what advice you would give to someone who wanted to be an astronaut.
    _________________________________________

ARISS News Release                                                                                No. 21-36

ARISS Contact is Scheduled with Students at Collège Maurice Genevoix, Couzeix, France

 
June 7, 2021—Amateur Radio on the International Space Station (ARISS) has received schedule confirmation for an ARISS radio contact with astronauts. ARISS is the group that puts together special amateur radio contacts between students around the globe and crew members with ham radio licenses on the International Space Station (ISS).
 
This will be a Multipoint Telebridge Contact via Amateur Radio between the ISS and students from Collège Maurice Genevoix. Students will take turns asking their questions of ISS Astronaut Thomas Pesquet, amateur radio call sign KG5FYG, during the ARISS radio contact. French is the language expected to be used during the contact. The downlink frequency for this contact is 145.800 MHZ and may be heard by listeners that are within the ISS-footprint that also encompasses the ARISS radio telebridge station.
 
ARISS team member Jan Poppeliers, in Aartselaar, Belgium using radio call sign ON4ISS, will serve as the ARISS relay amateur radio station. Each student asking a question on the ARISS radio will be conferenced in from home or social-distanced at school.
 
The ARISS radio contact is scheduled for June 7, 2021 at 3:07 pm CEST (Couzeix, France) (13:07 UTC, 9:07 am EDT, 8:07 am CDT, 7:07 am MDT, 6:07 am PDT).
 
Collège Maurice Genevoix (699 students in grades 6 to 13) is located near the city of Limoges, in central western France.  In preparation of this ARISS contact, course curricula were supplemented to link aspects of space habitation and space exploration with the existing courses. The school has partnered with members of the Amateur Radio Club of the University of Limoges who have helped the students prepare (and become licensed) for the contact and will support them during the contact.
 
View the livestream of the upcoming ARISS radio contact at: https://live.recreasciences.com/.
_______________________________

 As time allows, students will ask these questions:

  1. Comment gérez-vous le stress pendant une sortie dans l’espace?
  2. Pourquoi as-tu voulu être astronaute? Qu’est-ce qui t’attirait le plus?
  3. Qu’est-ce que vous aimez dans votre aventure dans l’espace en particulier?
  4. Avez-vous déjà rencontré de graves disfonctionnements lors d’une de vos expéditions?
  5. La préparation des missions est-elle compliquée et éprouvante?
  6. Quelle est la place de la femme dans l’aventure spatiale?
  7. Est-ce gênant de dormir debout dans l’ISS?
  8. Quelles sont les expériences que vous allez faire dans la Station Spatiale Internationale?
  9. Comment faites-vous pour manger et boire?
  10. Qu’est-ce que ça fait de partir dans l’espace pendant longtemps?
  11. Quelles sensations ressens-tu au niveau du décollage et dans l’espace?
  12. Est-ce facile de s’adapter à l’apesanteur?
  13. Est-ce que la pratique du judo vous a aidé dans la préparation de la 1ère mission?
  14. Comment fait-on à manger dans l’espace?  À quelles nourritures avez vous droit?
  15. Sous quelle forme est conditionnée la nourriture?
  16.  Quand vous êtes allé pour la première fois dans l’espace, aviez-vous eu le vertige, quels étaient vos sensations/vos sentiments?
  17.  J’imagine que cela n’a pas été facile de s’entraîner chaque jour sans relâche, est-ce que vous aviez déjà eu envie d’arrêter?
  18. Est ce que ton goût est-il affecté par l’apesanteur?
  19. Pouvez-vous respirer sans casque dans une fusée?
  20. Est-ce que la terre ferme vous manque?
  21. Comment fais-tu pour revenir sur terre?
  22. Combien de temps allez-vous passer dans l’espace?
  23. Comment faites vous pour manger et boire?

Translation:

  1. How do you deal with stress during a spacewalk?
  2. Why did you want to be an astronaut? What attracted you the most?
  3. What do you like about your adventure in space in particular?
  4. Have you ever encountered serious malfunctions during one of your expeditions?
  5. Is the preparation of missions complicated and stressful?
  6. What is the place of women in the space adventure?
  7. Is it embarrassing to sleep standing up in the ISS?
  8. What are the experiments you are going to do in the International Space Station?
  9. How do you eat and drink?
  10. How does it feel to be in space for a long time?
  11. What sensations do you feel during take-off and in space?
  12. Is it easy to adapt to weightlessness?
  13. Did the practice of Judo help you in the preparation of the 1st mission?
  14. How do you eat in space? What foods are you entitled to?
  15. How is the food packaged?
  16. When you first went to space, were you dizzy? What were your sensations / feelings?
  17. I guess it wasn’t easy to train tirelessly every day: have you ever wanted to give up?
  18. Is your taste affected by weightlessness?
  19. Can you breathe without a helmet in a rocket?
  20. Do you miss dry land (the earth)?
  21. How do you get back to earth?
  22. How long will you spend in space?
  23. How do you eat and drink?

__________________________________

ARISS News Release                                                                  No. 21-35

ARISS Contact is Scheduled with Students at
The Father’s House Christian School (Home Education Provider: Roots), Morinville, Alberta, Canada

May 31, 2021—Amateur Radio on the International Space Station (ARISS) has received schedule confirmation for an ARISS radio contact with astronauts. ARISS is the group that puts together special amateur radio contacts between students around the globe and crew members with ham radio licenses on the International Space Station (ISS).

This will be a Multipoint Telebridge Contact via Amateur Radio between the ISS and students from The Father’s House Christian School. Students will take turns asking their questions of ISS Astronaut Akihiko Hoshide, amateur radio call sign KE5DNI. English is the language that will be used during the contact. The downlink frequency for this contact is 145.800 MHZ and may be heard by listeners who are within the ISS footprint that also encompasses the ARISS radio telebridge station.

ARISS team member Shane Lynd, using call sign VK4KHZ from an amateur radio club station in Glenden, Queensland, Australia will serve as the relay amateur radio station. Each student asking a question on the ARISS radio will be conferenced in from home or social-distanced at school.

The ARISS radio contact is scheduled for June 2, 2021 at 8:28:53 am MDT (Morinville, Alberta, Canada) (14:28:53 UTC, 10:28:53 am EDT, 9:28:53 am CDT, 7:28:53 am PDT).

The Father’s House Christian School is a Home Education Provider (Roots). Roots has 257 families, 550 students and 14 facilitators in its homeschooling program. In preparation for the ARISS contact, students and parents were involved in activities / discussions about space travel and living on the ISS. Students also built a model of the ISS using recycled materials. Home-school teaching material sources included studies on space exploration, life on the ISS and primary science topics, drawn from the websites: European Space Agency (Space and Exploration), NASA (ISS KidZone), and Primary Science Teacher College.

View the live stream of the upcoming ARISS radio contact at https://youtu.be/S0_-QFkXdi4    

______________________    

As time allows, students will ask these questions: 

  1. How do you sleep when there is no gravity? 
  2. What do you eat in space, and how do you bring the food to space? 
  3. How do you not crash into space debris? 
  4. Is it hard to learn how to walk again on earth after being in the space station?
  5. What is the Canadarm used for? 
  6. How does a candle react when it is lit in space in a zero gravity and oxygen supplied environment?
  7. Why is going to Mars a one-way trip for humans?
  8. I am interested in Astrophotography. I recently saw a picture that Chris Cassidy captured of Hurricane Laura on August 25, 2020. Can you manually control the exterior cameras or are they are in a fixed position?  
  9. How long do you stay up in the ISS at a time? 
  10. Would a body decompose in space and if so, how long would it take? 
  11. What does it feel like to float in space? 
  12. How fast do you go? How many times do you orbit earth each day? 
  13. What happens if your radio breaks and you can’t talk to earth? 
  14. What are some experiments you are working on?
  15. How do you know where to land when you leave space and come back to earth? 
  16. Do you do anything special on birthdays and holidays in space? 
  17. What did it feel like looking back at earth the first time you saw it from space? 
  18. What does launching from earth feel like? 
  19. Is there anything flammable on the International Space Station, and if there is, what do you do if there is a fire?
  20. Does hair grow faster or slower in space?

ARISS News Release                                                               No. 21-34

ARISS Contact is Scheduled with Students at
College of Saint Pierre Marboz, Marboz, France

May 29, 2021—Amateur Radio on the International Space Station (ARISS) has received schedule confirmation for an ARISS radio contact with astronauts. ARISS is the group that puts together special amateur radio contacts between students around the globe and crew members with ham radio licenses on the International Space Station (ISS).

This will be a Multipoint Telebridge Contact via Amateur Radio between the ISS and students from College of Saint Pierre, Marboz. Students will take turns asking their questions of ISS Astronaut Thomas Pesquet, amateur radio call sign KG5FYG. French is the language that will be used during the contact. The downlink frequency for this contact is 145.800 MHZ and may be heard by listeners that are within the ISS-footprint that also encompasses the ARISS radio telebridge station.

The ARISS team in Casale Monferrato, Italy will use call sign IK1SLD to serve as the ARISS relay amateur radio ground station. Each student asking a question on the ARISS radio will be conferenced in from home or social-distanced at school.

The ARISS radio contact is scheduled for May 31, 2021 at 3:49 pm CEST (Marboz, France) (13:49 UTC, 9:49 am EDT, 8:49 am CDT, 7:49 am MDT, 6:49 am PDT).

College of Saint Pierre Marboz (CSPM) is a rural secondary school located in the Auvergne-Rhône-Alpes on the border of Bourgogne-Franche-Comté and within the Bresse Region of eastern France. CSPM’s students in years 3rd – 6th will be participating in the ARISS contact as well as students from surrounding elementary schools. In anticipation of this ARISS contact, CSPM integrated topics into their STEM program that highlights space-habitation and space-exploration, the solar system, orbital mechanics, astronomical phenomena, and radio science. Students have also specifically studied/followed the experiments conducted on the ISS. Student-field trips included a visit to the planetarium Vaulx-en-Velin and attending scientist-led presentations on the universe, the solar system, satellite links, and radio operation. Other student activities included learning basic printed circuit boards (e.g. Arduino). Members of the local amateur radio club (F5KBD) and ALTEC Association provided discovery workshops in the field of radio and space science.

View the live stream of the upcoming ARISS radio contact at https://youtu.be/HnPoFku7DXg and https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=J6BkP5ROxk8 
_______________________________        

As time allows, students will ask these questions:

  1. Qu’est ce qui vous a poussé à devenir astronaute?
  2. Quelle a été la différence de préparation entre les deux missions?
  3. Quelles sont vos sensations quand vous quittez la Terre?
  4. Est-ce facile de s’adapter à l’impesanteur?
  5. Pourquoi est-on impatient et content de repartir dans l’espace quand on y est allé déjà une fois?
  6. Si vous vous blessez ou faîtes un malaise dans l’Espace, comment faîtes vous?
  7. Pourriez vous vivre toute votre vie dans l’espace?
  8. Quelle est votre perception du temps dans la station? du jour et de la nuit? Votre horloge biologique est elle la même que dans l’Espace?
  9. Vous préférez marcher sur la Terre ou voler dans la station spatiale internationale?
  10. Il existe le mal des montagnes quand on monte en altitude. Existe-t-il le même mal dans l’espace? A-t-on une sensation de vertige quand on sort de l’ISS?
  11. Est-ce qu’il peut y avoir des collisions de la station avec des astéroïdes?
  12. Quels sont les plus grands dangers auxquels vous êtes exposés?
  13. En dehors de la Terre, que voyez-vous à travers les hublots de l’ISS?
  14. Vous est il arrivé de ne plus avoir envie de revenir sur la Terre?
  15. Qu’avez vous ressenti la première fois lorsque vous avez vu la Terre de l’espace?
  16. Est-ce qu’à partir de l’ISS, on peut voir les dommages sur l’environnement causés par l’Homme sur la Terre?
  17. Est-ce que l’espace est pollué?
  18. Avez-vous noté des modifications dans l’ISS depuis votre dernier voyage?
  19. Avez-vous réalisé votre rêve en allant dans la station internationale?
  20. Est-ce que vous souhaitez aller sur Mars un jour?

Translation:

  1. What made you become an astronaut?
  2. What was the difference in preparation between the two missions?
  3. How do you feel when you leave Earth?
  4. Is it easy to adapt to weightlessness?
  5. Why are we impatient and happy to go back to space when we’ve already been there once?
  6. If you hurt yourself or faint, how do you handle it?
  7. Could you spend your whole life in space?
  8. What is your perception of time in the station? Of day and night? Is your biological clock the same as in Space?
  9. Do you prefer to walk on Earth or fly on the International Space Station?
  10. There’s mountain sickness when you climb high. Is there the same problem in space? Do you feel dizzy when you leave the ISS?
  11. Could there be any collisions of the station with asteroids?
  12. What are the biggest dangers you face?
  13. Outside of Earth, what do you see through the ISS portholes?
  14. Have you ever felt like not wanting to come back on Earth?
  15. What did you feel the first time you saw Earth from space?
  16. From the ISS, can we see the damage to the environment caused by man on Earth?
  17. Is the space polluted?
  18. Have you noticed any changes in the ISS since your last trip?
  19. Have you made your dream come true by going to the international station?
  20. Would you like to go to Mars one day?